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Eugene McCann
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Eugene McCann

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Please take heed...   A great item to help improve personal security and general awareness of...

http://www.datagenetics.com/blog/september32012/
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Thanks Mr. McCann, good article.
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Eugene McCann

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Money, the jail we live in, or a simple concept for trading? Perhaps we need a 'shift of perception' - what do you think?
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Ahhh yeah, pushing hard...
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Now that is some accomplishment! 
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Eugene McCann

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is liking this UI
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Ah, yes, I am just getting to know it and beginning to see the advantages.
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Eugene McCann

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Care for another 'urban legend'? This was has been verified as true by a couple sources.

A man sat at a metro station in Washington DC and started to play the violin; it was a cold January morning. He played six Bach pieces for about 45 minutes. During that time, since it was rush hour, it was calculated that 1,100 people went through the station, most of them on their way to work.

Three minutes went by, and a middle aged man noticed there was musician playing. He slowed his pace, and stopped for a few seconds, and then hurried up to meet his schedule.

A minute later, the violinist received his first dollar tip: a woman threw the money in the till and without stopping, and continued to walk.

A few minutes later, someone leaned against the wall to listen to him, but the man looked at his watch and started to walk again. Clearly he was late for work.

The one who paid the most attention was a 3 year old boy. His mother tagged him along, hurried, but the kid stopped to look at the violinist. Finally, the mother pushed hard, and the child continued to walk, turning his head all the time. This action was repeated by several other children. All the parents, without exception, forced them to move on.

In the 45 minutes the musician played, only 6 people stopped and stayed for a while. About 20 gave him money, but continued to walk their normal pace. He collected $32. When he finished playing and silence took over, no one noticed it. No one applauded, nor was there any recognition.

No one knew this, but the violinist was Joshua Bell, one of the most talented musicians in the world. He had just played one of the most intricate pieces ever written, on a violin worth $3.5 million dollars.

Two days before his playing in the subway, Joshua Bell sold out at a theater in Boston where the seats averaged $100.

This is a real story. Joshua Bell playing incognito in the metro station was organized by the Washington Post as part of a social experiment about perception, taste, and priorities of people. The outlines were: in a commonplace environment at an inappropriate hour: Do we perceive beauty? Do we stop to appreciate it? Do we recognize the talent in an unexpected context?

One of the possible conclusions from this experience could be:

If we do not have a moment to stop and listen to one of the best musicians in the world playing the best music ever written, how many other things are we missing?

Thanks +Kyle Salewski providing the actual video link here:
Stop and Hear the Music

+Christine Jacinta Cabalo Points out that Joshua Bell has this story on his website:
http://www.joshuabell.com/news/pulitzer-prize-winning-washington-post-feature

http://www.snopes.com/music/artists/bell.asp
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Thanks +Eugene McCann
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I fear all too often businesses / martketeers mistakenly believe dark patterns serve them better than honesty and clarity; I also can't think of a single situation where a user in recognising a dark pattern, doesn't break the relationship with the provider. I believe good business stems from trust, I don't believe employing deceptive and dark patterns helps a business.
Nassos K. originally shared:
 
Dark Patterns: Deception vs. Honesty in UI Design
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Interesting article. The law on e mail marketing is also quite confusing but there have been some attempts to clarify the situation in Ireland http://www.irishtimes.com/newspaper/finance/2011/0714/1224300711438.html
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Ujean, eTailor
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Sharing and caring husband and father.  Curious and optimistic imagineer.
Best fish & chips ever! Seriously, if you like your fish & chips, this is the best reason to visit Blackrock there's been for years - yes, it's definitely worth putting in the effort to get over there. Super, friendly service and the food is so tasty you'll have to go back - every person I've introduced to it has gone back for more and has thanked me for telling them about the place. A lovely little seating area too. The world needs more places like this.
Public - 5 months ago
reviewed 5 months ago
Nasty cheap tat - you'd be better bare foot than wearing the footwear from here. It is a nice store, with lovely staff and funky stuff. Just a shame the footwear purchased was rubbish that fell apart two within weeks. The store were no help when I return the flip flops - because I'd worn them!
Public - 5 months ago
reviewed 5 months ago
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