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Mark Hammer
Works at SmartBear Software
Lives in Austin, TX
91 followers|5,938 views
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Nice article on employee engagement... 
The struggle to keep even star employees engaged never ends. Here's how to invest in people for better connections within your company.
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Mark Hammer

commented on a video on YouTube.
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Really well done, Hendrix (and SSLYBY....)
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He's right... And it's not just a threat to the web but to democracy as a whole...

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-25033577
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Mark Hammer

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2014
 
We're so excited to bring Google Fiber to Austin in 2014. Share this graphic and let your friends and family know you that you'll be one of the first to sign up for Fiber.

You can sign up for updates about Fiber in Austin here: https://google.com/fiber/austin/ 
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This is about 20 minutes of super 8 film that Stewart Brand shot in the winter of 1971. It documents the production of the January 1971 "Difficult But Possible Supplement" to The Whole Earth Catalog. Supplements were 60-page long magazine-like periodicals that appeared seasonally between the many-year cycle of the book-like Catalogs.  

This films shows (briefly near the end) the simple tools used to make the catalogs: paper, wax, an IBM Selectric typewriter, and a Polaroid reproduction camera.

There were 6 staff from Whole Earth, and 2 from Ant Farm, an art collective. Ant Farm built the structures. The camp was centered around a beautiful wild hot spring.  70 miles to the nearest phone.  They erected a dome in the desert and then battled the winds while trying to erect an inflatable structure. It was Burning Man 40 years ago.

The wind came up and blew away the production inflatable (bounding across the desert), and they had to move production of the Catalog into the Airstream that Stewart and his wife Lois lived in.  Ant Farm lived in their little dome (seen trucking from one site to another).

I asked Stewart why they went to the desert to produce a magazine?

"Why did we do it?  My excuse was to prove that production could be anywhere---an early Maker impulse I suppose.  The real reason was the pure joy of doing something difficult but possible in the desert.  The whole story of the making of the Supplement was printed in the Supplement." 
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Have him in circles
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Mark Hammer

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Excited to be speaking @developconf in Brighton in July. Bringing a very special gaming expert to discuss quality in gaming! 
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Useful info from Google on the '25 Rules For Building A Better Mobile Site'
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Mark Hammer

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Good article Colin. And I agree with you that both are beneficial to teams. I think most like pairing for what you call the camaraderie benefit -- and learning from someone else.  If a tool is used for code review, there are additional benefits to the team. For example, if you spread the reviews around, more developers learn more of the overall code base. Also, if the team is distributed, a developer in the US, for example, can submit his code for review by a developer in the east and have it reviewed by the time he returns to work the next day. Some systems also track things like # of defects found, etc.
Inspired by a great post Pairing vs. Code Review: Comparing Developer Cultures  by Paul Hinze of So Create I wanted to keep this for reference. We do code review in the VLE team at the OU but not pair programming. I can see i...
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Just saw an article in the Times titled "More Freedom on the Plane, if Nowhere Else," which I read as "Morgan Freeman on the Plane, If Nowhere Else." Getting a second cup now...
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I would love to see this up close...
 
Findy's fun fact: If you ever thought wearing bike helmets were uncomfortable and perhaps unfashionable, then you'll be thankful for the invention of the invisible bike helmet! Created by two Swedish women, the Hövding helmet contains accelerometers that detect these unusual movements and deploy the airbag if the movement patterns match the profile of a crash. Each helmet also contains a "Black Box" that records the accelerometer data 10 seconds before a deployment. This data can be used by the Hövding developers to improve the product. The Hövding collar is constructed of a waterproof material, and has interchangeable fabric "shells" that allow colour customisation.
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I didn't see that one coming

+T-Mobile
Wat R U Doin?
+T-Mobile
Stahp!

I have barely had time to make fun of other carriers about your revolutionary approach to international phone roaming, and now you're forcing me to re-think mobile tablets.

For an existing voice customer, $10 for unlimited basic tablet data in about 100 countries, plus 500MB of high-speed domestic data, without a long-term commitment?

Daily pass with 500MB of high-speed for $5? 1GB weekly pass for $10? Including unlimited basic data after that for the rest of the day/week?

200MB a month for free forever?

I can't find words to describe how outdated everyone else looks. Certainly, though, I can't think of any better way to celebrate the G1's 5th birthday.
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Could Healthcare.gov Defects Have Been Avoided?
+Greg Mooney 
Whether you love the Affordable Healthcare Act or think it’s a sign of the Apocalypse, there’s one thing that’s certain – the Healthcare.gov website didn’t work as well as Washington would have hoped.

On Sunday, federal officials announced that the online marketplace needed design changes as well as more server capacity to improve the website performance. But subsequent announcements from the administration indicate that this is more than just a capacity and design issue – in fact, the issue may involve how the site was coded and how it was tested in pre-deployment.

Here’s the background — on October 1, consumers were offered the opportunity to begin shopping for new insurance policies in the government’s online marketplace. Some states handled their online marketplaces themselves, but 36 states relied on the federal government for the creation, hosting and operation of their portals.

As of Friday, more than 9 million people had attempted to access Healthcare.gov in search of insurance coverage. Tens of thousands were able to start the application process, but due to software glitches, only a few thousand were able to successfully create accounts, and even fewer were able to select a policy.
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Have him in circles
91 people
David Johns's profile photo
Erin King's profile photo
Matt Dillahunty's profile photo
Greg Wyne's profile photo
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  • SmartBear Software
    2012 - present
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Interested in code review methadologies, product management, marketing, music, art.
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Massive Multiplayer Thumb-Wrestling Legendary Grand Master
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Austin, TX
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