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Jennifer Anderson
48 followers -
Editrix, Word Witch, Health Policy Writer
Editrix, Word Witch, Health Policy Writer

48 followers
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Still churning through your #NaNoWriMo17 project? Check out this great advice about tension versus conflict. Be wary of attempting to create tension or drama via bad decisions or poor communication between characters. It can work, but if your readers are rolling their eyes because your characters are always making the wrong decisions or keeping secrets, you're going to fail. People make bad decisions. They don't always talk to each other when they should. But don't rely on that aspect of humanity to power the tension in your narrative.
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Want to hang out? I've started scheduling 2018 events and appearances. Contact me if you want to schedule an in-person meeting or self-editing clinic.
2018 Appearances - Clearing Blocks
2018 Appearances - Clearing Blocks
clearingblocksediting.com
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It's hard to believe it's almost 2018—and #NaNoWriMo17 is right around the corner. To find out how I can help your manuscript shine, visit clearingblocksediting.com/contact. You can request a quote and a sample edit—or just ask a question. #amediting #selfpub
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I'm always vaguely concerned that editors constantly feel the need to explain why the services they offer are important. There seems to be this pervasive fear that editors exist to destroy narratives, silence voices, and stomp characters into submission. And while editors should indeed be allies, or as Georgina says, "the person who has your back as you walk out into the world on these pages," allyship requires challenging ideas and pushing people (or in our case, stories) to be the best possible versions of themselves.
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Need a quick refresher on how to work with Microsoft Word's Track Changes function? This should help.
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Industry-standard stuff here, but great reminders for writers thinking about querying or maximizing marketing. (For what it's worth, I consider 80,000 words a standard-length novel for rating purposes.)
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For many of us, our livelihood relies on our ability to spin words into magic. And as a working writer who generates content for public consumption, I constantly worry about losing my touch. What if no one responds? What if I don't have it anymore? What if my relevance has waned for good?

As usual, Kameron Hurley nails it.
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If you follow me on other platforms, you've probably noticed that I advocate for eliminating the use of ableist language and finding better, more accurate substitutes for words such as "crazy" or "lame" or "stupid." I discuss why "fell on deaf ears" and "standing up for social justice" can be problematic. But equally important is the way we talk about our feelings.

Has someone ever told you that they're "so OCD" because they prefer organization over clutter? That they had an "anxiety attack" because a movie was so tense? That they're "totally depressed" because of something trivial? I've heard it. And while I'm not here to minimize the way people feel, it's important to note that using those words to describe feelings like worry or sadness can inadvertently trivialize mental illness and contribute to stigma and erasure.

(Also, as a note, I'm not thrilled with this: "They’re a mental illness that people suffer from and our ignorance regarding the usage of these words disrespects their sufferings." I dislike using words such as "suffering" that connote pity, make assumptions, or pass judgement.)
"Here’s a list of few words that will help you understand the difference between natural human emotions or habits and mental illnesses. Because words matter. Let’s all be more sensitive and supportive towards mental health issues."
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#health #mentalhealth #ableism #communication #usage

[Image: Green and yellow chart that uses text and small illustrations to compare words that describe human emotions or habits and those that describe mental illnesses.]
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The third book in Alex Ziebart's Lady Superior series is now available! (But hey, if you haven't read the first two, you may want to start there.) Alex writes hyper local urban superheroes who could easily be you or me and chronicles their journey to—let's just pretend it's "greatness." Pick it up today!
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"Don’t accuse victims of triggering their own assaults."

We so often forget this, but editors can be educators, and we can wield our red pens for justice. You may not have the power to change what you want at your organization, but you can—and should—try to flag biased language.
"Editors can minimize unfair and inaccurate media coverage of sexual assault by flagging biased reporting and words that shift blame to the victim."
—Karen Yin, http://consciousstyleguide.com/sensitive-style-for-covering-sexual-violence/

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#gender #sexuality #violence #journalism #editing #sexualassault #consciouslanguage
[Image: A stack of eight smooth stones standing next to a lake or ocean. Words on the image: "From Bias and Blame to Balance: Sensitive Style for Covering Sexual Violence; by Karen Yin • June 7, 2017, Conscious Style Guide"]
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