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Tyler Moore
471 followers -
If I'm not busy or away from the computer, don't hesitate to get in touch with me.
If I'm not busy or away from the computer, don't hesitate to get in touch with me.

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Duck Dynasty, Being Gay and Social Change
Apologies in advance for poor grammar and ramblings.  Those of you who've read my thoughts before know all too well my penchant for not stopping. I've read the GQ article  which has caused so much frustration for so many people and it seems more than a litt...

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Very disappointing this addressing texting as if it's the big thing, but makes no mention whatsoever about instant messaging, which of course had its heyday in the 90's and early 2000's.  Speaking about writing as speaking is great, but they discuss it only in the texting with thumbs which is a much slower means of entering that text.  Autocomplete helps though  and aside from a reemergence of the notification of an interlocutor 'is typing', instant messaging seems to me a much more apt analogue to speech compared to text.  Further, many of the abbreviations used in texts came first in the non-mobile arena with people hammering away on full sized keyboards.

As a postscript, the real-time visualization of typing that at least I first saw in Google Wave and has since been added back to a limited degree in Drive is something that heavily changes the way text-based communication if those participating in it are paying attention actively, as they can simply begin responding prior to the completion of a thought, very similar to verbalized speech.  While it makes a transcript of such a conversation very difficult to reread later on, my experience with it is that the in-the-moment engagement is far greater than 'Tyler is typing' or the silence traditional text messaging on mobiles provides.

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'Freeing those workers, of course, would mean they'd have to find work elsewhere -- a common plight in the history of technology.'

This is always thrown in there randomly and for some automation and especially at different times in history it's not that huge of a concern.  But when Amazon's drones could seriously affect the number of drivers UPS, FedEx and the USPS need(not to mention the effects on brick and mortar retail employees), fast food companies are openly speaking about how they'd be forced to consider automated systems instead of paying higher wages for their service employees and who knows what all Google's moonshot could affect, we need to have serious discussions on how people will be provided for and will be able to provide for others in financial ways.  

It may be the working poor low skill laborers being affected now, but it's only a matter of time before doctors and financial managers are the next rung being mused over in 'what do you actually do around here?' ways that software or hardware couldn't do better, more reliably or at the very least tirelessly.

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