Profile

Cover photo
Margriet Mulder
60,001 views
AboutPostsPhotosVideos

Stream

Margriet Mulder

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
Edo period street scene

Traveling through Japan, several times I found myself in landscapes that seemed frozen in time… And in some almost magical cases, not only the landscape was contributing to the feeling, but also the people.

Take a look at this photo taken on a street inside the Koko-en garden in Himeji, where I had the chance to meet these traditionally dressed ladies…

http://muza-chan.net/japan/index.php/blog/edo-period-street-scene

21 comments on original post
1
Add a comment...

Margriet Mulder

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
Suggest a caption for this GIF please?

Please Follow: +Interesting Things
3 comments on original post
1
Add a comment...

Margriet Mulder

Shared publicly  - 
1
Add a comment...

Margriet Mulder

Shared publicly  - 
 
Transparent crab shell holds the secret to bendable screens
By Mark Brown, wired.co.uk | Published 20 minutes ago

Biologists from Kyoto University in Japan have turned a crab's shell transparent. More than just a neat party trick, the research into see-through structures could help the construction of flat panel displays, solar cells and bendy screens.
Muhammad Iftekhar Shams and his team at Kyoto University took an entire (dead) crab, and treated its body to a brew of acids and chemicals. Hydrochloric acid, sodium hydroxide and ethanol stripped the body of minerals, proteins, lipids, fats and pigments.
This left a crab shell made entirely of translucent chitin. Chitin is a long-chain polymer that is the main component of crustacean exoskeletons.
Finally, the shell was immersed in an acrylic resin monomer. Polymerisation kicked in (monomer molecules react together to form polymer chains), and the team ended up with a perfect, ghostly recreation of a crab, only now completely see-through.
Buoyed by their success, Shams and colleagues crushed up chitin from crab shells and spread the powdered material into a nanocomposite sheet. Then, much like the crab body, the paper-like sheet was given the acrylic resin monomer treatment, leading to an optically transparent panel.
The material is exciting because it doesn't expand or lose its stability when heated—in fact, it's ten times as resistant to heat as traditional materials such as glass-fiber epoxies. This makes it a potential material for building bendable screens or solar cells that are moulded into shapes. It has a high light transmittance too.
"This class of materials is an interesting candidate for transparent substrates in next-generation electronic devices such as flexible displays and solar cells," the team writes in the paper's abstract—published by the Royal Society of Chemistry.
Better still is that chitin—the secret ingredient—is abundant in nature. Not only is it found in the shells of crabs, lobsters and shrimps, this adaptable natural material also shows up in the cell walls of fungi, the exoskeletons of arthropods and insects, the tongue-like radulas of mollusks, and the beaks of cephalopods.
Image courtesy of Royal Society of Chemistry/Kyoto University
1
Add a comment...

Margriet Mulder

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
Simply beautiful Japanese scenes, restaurants along the river in Kyoto

Among the many beautiful places that I have seen in Kyoto, a favorite location is this shore of Kamo River, running parallel to Ponto-cho. Most of these buildings are restaurants built in a traditional style, on wooden pillars over the water.

The diffused light coming from terraces, combined to the soft gurgle of the water makes ths place perfect for a relaxing summer night… Simply beautiful!

http://muza-chan.net/japan/index.php/blog/simply-beautiful-japanese-scenes-restaurants-along-river-in-kyoto

58 comments on original post
1
Add a comment...

Margriet Mulder

Shared publicly  - 
 
Architect | MYD studio originally shared:
 
Inside the Seattle Central Library, Rem Koolhaas Office for Metropolitan Architecture (OMA)
View original post
1
1
Add a comment...

Margriet Mulder

Shared publicly  - 
 
Language is one of the most fascinating technologies, a human invention so central to our social function and very survival it’s practically indistinguishable from life itself. Yet languages are incredibly intricate, complicated, culture-specific organisms, and much of their delicate complexity can get lost in translation.
The practice of translation rests on two presuppositions. The first is that we are all different: we speak different tongues, and see the world in ways that are deeply influenced by the particular features of the tongue that we speak. The second is that we are all the same—that we can share the same broad and narrow kinds of feelings, information, understandings, and so forth. Without both of these suppositions, translation could not exist. Nor could anything we would like to call social life. Translation is another name for the human condition.”
~ David Bellos
Is That a Fish in Your Ear? ranges across the whole of human experience, from foreign films to philosophy, to show why translation is at the heart of what we do and who we are. What's the difference b...
1
Add a comment...
Collections Margriet is following
View all
Basic Information
Gender
Female