Profile

Cover photo
Mars Initiative
169,099 followers|6,343,919 views
AboutPostsPhotosVideos

Stream

Pinned

Mars Initiative

Shared publicly  - 
29
5
Carlos Tomaz's profile photoSpace Venture's profile photoSamantha Pearl's profile photoJoan Salas's profile photo
 
really journey of mars                                           
Add a comment...

Mars Initiative

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
The Mars "Webcam" image collage | ESA Mars Express
This is a collage of Visual Monitoring Camera (VMC) images acquired on May 25th and downloaded to Earth early on May 26, 2015. They are among the first in a series of over 2000 images that are being acquired by Mars Express in support of the VMC Schools Campaign.
 
In March 2015, ESA invited schools, science clubs and youth groups to submit proposals for imaging Mars using the VMC—the 'Mars Webcam'—on board Mars Express.
 
VMC is a simple, low-resolution device that was originally intended only to provide visual confirmation of Beagle lander separation. Since 2007, it has provided unique images of Mars, including crescent views of the planet not obtainable from Earth, which are routinely shared via a dedicated blog and Flickr.
 
Of over 50 responses received from worldwide, 25 proposals from 12 countries (Austria, Belgium, Germany, Estonia, Spain, UK, Greece, Italy, Latvia, Poland, Portugal, USA) were selected to receive images of their desired targets. These comprise martian surface features ranging from Olympus Mons and Meridani Planum to Phillips Crater and the South Pole.
 
Each group has promised to complete an educational or artistic project/activity using their images, which will later be published by ESA.
 
Mars Express is conducting three imaging orbits on 25 and 26 May dedicated to the campaign, and the complete image set is expected to be downloaded before the end of May and will be distributed to the participants shortly thereafter.
 
Follow the VMC Schools Campaign via the Mars Express blog:
http://blogs.esa.int/mex
 
Credit: ESA/Mars Express/VMC – CC BY-SA IGO 3.0

+European Space Agency, ESA 

#ESA #Space #Mars #Astronomy #Science #Spacecraft #Orbiter #MarsExpress #VMC #Camera #Planet #RedPlanet #JourneytoMars #Webcam #Martian #Polar #Europe 
7 comments on original post
21
1
Enael Pires's profile photo
Add a comment...

Mars Initiative

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
Mars: A View Into Marias Pass | NASA Curiosity Rover
Panorama mosaic of four images acquired by Curiosity's Mastcam on Sol 992 (May 22, 2015). The hill at the left (eastern) edge is called Apikuni Mountain. Assembled and edited in Photoshop.

Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS
Edited by Jason Major

+NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory 
+Jason Major 

#NASA #Mars #Panorama #Space #Astronomy #Science #Rover
#Curiosity #Gale #Crater #MountSharp #AeolisMons #MSL #Orbiter #Sol992 #Engineering #Technology #STEM #RedPlanet #Robotic
#JPL #Marias #Pass #Apikuni #Mountain
4 comments on original post
25
2
akhtar nikmal's profile photorich jay's profile photoJack Neaves III's profile photoSamantha Pearl's profile photo
2 comments
 
+akhtar nikmal guess again
Add a comment...

Mars Initiative

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
Mars mystery: The ExoMars mission | ESA Euronews
May 22, 2015: The ExoMars 2016 mission will try to answer one of the toughest and most intriguing questions in our Solar System: is there, or has there ever been, life on Mars?

Getting to Mars, landing there safely, and then beginning the search for life is a huge scientific and technical challenge for the large team behind ExoMars, a joint ESA and Roscosmos project to search for life on Mars. It is the world's biggest ever mission to the red planet.The ExoMars mission could reveal if there is, or has ever been, life on Mars by the end of the decade.

More about ExoMars: http://exploration.esa.int/mars/

This video is also available in the following languages on YouTube:
Italian: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1upALskwxD8
Greek: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zfk3oC1Gios
French: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p8ZSihhWImg 
Hungarian: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j0be4f-PPNk
Portuguese: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X50TMG0vSnU
German: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1wTsARN4Di8
Spanish: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6ExT47YH_kU

Credit: European Space Agency (ESA)

+European Space Agency, ESA 

#ESA #Space #Astronomy #Mars #ExoMars #Science #Trace #Gas #Orbiter #Atmosphere #Spacecraft #RedPlanet #Roscosmos #Russia #Россия #Life  #Habitability #Astrobiology
 ·  Translate
4 comments on original post
16
3
Kevin Templeman's profile photoKapt. Kirk's profile photo
Add a comment...

Mars Initiative

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
Martian Reminder of a Pioneering Flight | NASA Opportunity Rover
May 21, 2015: Names related to the first solo nonstop flight across the Atlantic have been informally assigned to a crater NASA's Opportunity Mars rover is studying.  NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity is studying an elongated crater called "Spirit of St. Louis" and a rock spire called "Lindbergh Mound" within the crater. The crater and several features in and near it are shown in this recent image from Opportunity's panoramic camera (Pancam).

Throughout Opportunity's 11-plus years on Mars, the science team for the rover has picked crater names from a list of "vessels of exploration," including ships, spacecraft and aircraft. The names informally assigned for this crater and features in it refer to Charles Lindbergh's May 1927 flight from New York to Paris in the airplane he named Spirit of St. Louis, the first solo nonstop flight across the Atlantic.

Researchers at Washington University in St. Louis help lead the Opportunity mission. A news release from the university describes the connection between St. Louis and Lindbergh, at:
https://news.wustl.edu/news/Pages/St.Louis-crater.aspx

NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, manages the Mars Exploration Rover Project for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington. For more information about Opportunity's exploration of Mars, visit: www.nasa.gov/rovers and
http://mars.nasa.gov/mer

Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell Univ./Arizona State Univ.

+NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory 
+Arizona State University 

#NASA #Space #Mars #Rover #Opportunity #Endeavour #Crater
#Panorama #Photography #Spirit #CharlesLindbergh #SaintLouis #Atlantic #Flight #JPL #History #Remembrance #Tribute
1 comment on original post
23
1
Ted Welles's profile photo
Add a comment...
In their circles
4,790 people
Have them in circles
169,099 people
Justin Bridges's profile photo
A Kh's profile photo
Oscar Auto Repair Services's profile photo
Robert Jio's profile photo
Amir Yacaman's profile photo
Blake Gafford's profile photo
Kerry Mckenna's profile photo
jeff new's profile photo
Megan Pinder's profile photo

Mars Initiative

Shared publicly  - 
15
1
Carlos F. Lange's profile photo
Add a comment...

Mars Initiative

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
Mars Guide: "Honey, I Shrunk the Mesas" [VIDEO] | NASA
The South Polar residual cap (the part that lasts through the summer) is composed of carbon dioxide ice. Although the cap survives each warm summer season, it is constantly changing its shape due to sublimation of carbon dioxide from steep slopes and deposition onto flat areas. 

This observation was acquired on March 23, 2015, in the summer of Mars Year 32. The same area was imaged in another observation on August 28, 2007 in the summer of Mars Year 28. You can barely recognize that this is the same area! The high-standing mesas have shrunk to about half of their size in 2007, but the low areas between mesas have filled in with new carbon dioxide material.

Video Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona
Narration Credit: Tre Gibbs
Caption Credit: Alfred McEwen   
Release Date: May 20, 2015

+NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory 

#NASA #Mars #Space #Astronomy #Science #Polar #South #Cap #Ice #CarbonDioxide #Mesas #Sublimation #Geoscience #MRO #Reconnaissance #JPL #HiRISE #Camera #Video #HD
2 comments on original post
10
1
Leslie ann Romano's profile photo
Add a comment...

Mars Initiative

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
Mars Guide: "Honey, I Shrunk the Mesas" | NASA
The South Polar residual cap (the part that lasts through the summer) is composed of carbon dioxide ice. Although the cap survives each warm summer season, it is constantly changing its shape due to sublimation of carbon dioxide from steep slopes and deposition onto flat areas. 

This observation was acquired on March 23, 2015, in the summer of Mars Year 32. The same area was imaged in another observation on August 28, 2007 in the summer of Mars Year 28. You can barely recognize that this is the same area! The high-standing mesas have shrunk to about half of their size in 2007, but the low areas between mesas have filled in with new carbon dioxide material.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona
Caption Credit: Alfred McEwen   
Release Date: May 20, 2015

+NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory 

#NASA #Mars #Space #Astronomy #Science #Polar #South #Cap #Ice #CarbonDioxide #Mesas #Sublimation #Geoscience #MRO #Reconnaissance #JPL #HiRISE #Camera 
6 comments on original post
11
Add a comment...

Mars Initiative

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
Doug Litteken talkMARS: “Inflate Your Space” | NASA JSC
Doug Litteken discusses the importance of using inflatable structures for a human mission to Mars and tackles some of the myths associated with these space vehicles. Litteken is an engineer at NASA Johnson Space Center focusing on composite and inflatable lightweight structures for human rated space vehicles. He is a member of the JSC Speakers Bureau and enjoys sharing his excitement for space exploration with audiences of young and old.

Johnson Space Center’s talkMARS presentations do not follow the model of a typical technical briefing. These talks focus more on the “why” of a human mission to Mars and translate complicated technologies and ideas in an easy-to-understand format.

Credit: NASA/JSC
Duration: 11 minutes
Release Date: May 14, 2015

+Doug Litteken 
+NASA Johnson Space Center 

#NASA   #Space   #Mars   #JourneytoMars   #Human #Exploration #Inflatable #Structures #Lightweight #Vehicles #Composite
#Technology  #Engineering #Science
3 comments on original post
7
2
Angeline Reeks's profile photoRahmawati Umi's profile photo
Add a comment...

Mars Initiative

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
NASA's Curiosity Rover Adjusts Route Up Martian Mountain
Unfavorable Terrain for Crossing Near 'Logan Pass'
Rover's Reward for Climbing: Exposed Geological Contact
This May 10, 2015, view from Curiosity's Mastcam shows terrain judged difficult for traversing between the rover and an outcrop in the middle distance where a pale rock unit meets a darker rock unit above it. The rover team decided not to approach this outcrop and identified an alternative. 

Fast Facts:
› Alternative science site reached by climbing.
› Excessive slip prompted change in plans.

NASA's Curiosity Mars rover climbed a hill Thursday to approach an alternative site for investigating a geological boundary, after a comparable site proved hard to reach.

The drive of about 72 feet (22 meters) up slopes as steep as 21 degrees brought Curiosity close to a target area where two distinctive types of bedrock meet. The rover science team wants to examine an outcrop that contains the contact between the pale rock unit the mission analyzed lower on Mount Sharp and a darker, bedded rock unit that the mission has not yet examined up close.

Two weeks ago, Curiosity was headed for a comparable geological contact farther south. Foiled by slippery slopes on the way there, the team rerouted the vehicle and chose a westward path.The mission's strategic planning keeps multiple route options open to deal with such situations.

"Mars can be very deceptive," said Chris Roumeliotis, Curiosity's lead rover driver at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California. "We knew that polygonal sand ripples have caused Curiosity a lot of drive slip in the past, but there appeared to be terrain with rockier, more consolidated characteristics directly adjacent to these ripples. So we drove around the sand ripples onto what we expected to be firmer terrain that would give Curiosity better traction. Unfortunately, this terrain turned out to be unconsolidated material too, which definitely surprised us and Curiosity."

In three out of four drives between May 7 and May 13, Curiosity experienced wheel slippage in excess of the limit set for the drive, and it stopped mid-drive for safety. The rover's onboard software determines the amount of slippage occurring by comparing the wheel-rotation tally to actual drive distance calculated from analysis of images taken during the drive.

The rover was heading generally southward from near the base of a feature called "Jocko Butte" toward a geological contact in the eastern part of the "Logan Pass" area.

Routes to this contact site would have required driving across steeper slopes than Curiosity has yet experienced on Mars, and the rover had already experienced some sideways slipping on one slope in this area.

"We decided to go back to Jocko Butte, and, in parallel, work with the scientists to identify alternate routes," Roumeliotis said.

The team spent a few days analyzing images from the rover and from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter to choose the best route for short-term and long-term objectives.

"One factor the science team considers is how much time to spend reaching a particular target, when there are many others ahead," said Curiosity Project Scientist Ashwin Vasavada of JPL. "We used observations from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter to identify an alternative site for investigating the geological contact in the Logan Pass area. It's a little mind-blowing to drive up a hill to a site we saw only in satellite images and then find it in front of us."

Curiosity has been exploring on Mars since 2012. It reached the base of Mount Sharp last year after fruitfully investigating outcrops closer to its landing site and then trekking to the mountain. The main mission objective now is to examine successively higher layers of Mount Sharp.

JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, built the rover and manages the project for NASA's Science Mission Directorate in Washington. For more information about Curiosity, visit:

www.nasa.gov/msl
http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl

Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS

+NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory 

#NASA #Mars #Panorama #Space #Astronomy #Science #Rover
#Curiosity #Gale #Crater #MountSharp #AeolisMons #MSL #Orbiter #Sol981 #Engineering #Technology #STEM #RedPlanet #Robotic
#JPL
8 comments on original post
27
3
Hjordis Torfa's profile photoRuel Rankine's profile photoNatalia V.'s profile photohugo.J. torres chaparro's profile photo
 
Men are from Mars..womans from Venus +Mars Initiative and I'm a Libragirl.. Thank you for sharing this with all of us Have a wonderus day ♡lol:-))
Add a comment...

Mars Initiative

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
Martian Reminder of a Pioneering Flight | NASA Opportunity Rover
May 21, 2015: Names related to the first solo nonstop flight across the Atlantic have been informally assigned to a crater NASA's Opportunity Mars rover is studying.  NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity is studying an elongated crater called "Spirit of St. Louis" and a rock spire called "Lindbergh Mound" within the crater. The crater and several features in and near it are shown in this recent image from Opportunity's panoramic camera (Pancam).

Throughout Opportunity's 11-plus years on Mars, the science team for the rover has picked crater names from a list of "vessels of exploration," including ships, spacecraft and aircraft. The names informally assigned for this crater and features in it refer to Charles Lindbergh's May 1927 flight from New York to Paris in the airplane he named Spirit of St. Louis, the first solo nonstop flight across the Atlantic.

Researchers at Washington University in St. Louis help lead the Opportunity mission. A news release from the university describes the connection between St. Louis and Lindbergh, at:
https://news.wustl.edu/news/Pages/St.Louis-crater.aspx

NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, manages the Mars Exploration Rover Project for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington. For more information about Opportunity's exploration of Mars, visit: www.nasa.gov/rovers and
http://mars.nasa.gov/mer

Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell Univ./Arizona State Univ.

+NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory 
+Arizona State University 

#NASA #Space #Mars #Rover #Opportunity #Endeavour #Crater
#Panorama #Photography #Spirit #CharlesLindbergh #SaintLouis
#Atlantic #Flight #JPL #History #Remembrance #Tribute #Annotated
View original post
34
2
Rahmawati Umi's profile photoVincent Chu's profile photo
Add a comment...

Mars Initiative

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
Mars: Siloe Patera in context | ESA Mars Express
This context image shows the portion of the Arabia Terra region on Mars that was imaged by the High Resolution Stereo Camera on ESA’s Mars Express on November 26, 2014. Siloe Patera is the largest feature in the region outlined by the inner white box.

Credit & Copyright: NASA Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) MOLA Science Team

+European Space Agency, ESA 
+NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory 

#NASA #ESA #Mars #Space #SiloePatera #ArabiaTerra #Astronomy #Science #MarsExpress #Spacecraft #DLR #Germany #Deutschland #HRSC #Camera #Geoscience #MGS  #MarsGlobalSurveyor  #MOLA  #Global
1 comment on original post
14
1
Hjordis Torfa's profile photoTed Welles's profile photo
 
This is Amazing wow factor photo.. +Friends of NASA have som awsome shares..thank you ♡:-) 
Add a comment...
People
In their circles
4,790 people
Have them in circles
169,099 people
Justin Bridges's profile photo
A Kh's profile photo
Oscar Auto Repair Services's profile photo
Robert Jio's profile photo
Amir Yacaman's profile photo
Blake Gafford's profile photo
Kerry Mckenna's profile photo
jeff new's profile photo
Megan Pinder's profile photo
Contact Information
Contact info
Email
Story
Tagline
1 Million people for a Human Mission to Mars
Introduction
Mars Initiative is an international organization that wants humanity to explore Mars and The Final Frontier.
We support the creation of the first human settlements on Mars for our long-term survival as a species! Mars Initiative is a global, collaborative action movement, dedicated to raising the funding needed to support the first human mission to Mars.

Education & cooperation are key to achieving our goals!

Mars Initiative is a registered non-profit—a U.S.-based charity staffed entirely by unpaid volunteers who passionately believe in our cause.

YOU are welcome to join our global network!
Contribute your creative ideas, talents and energy!
Come learn what science knows now about Mars. 
Ask questions! Share its mysteries! Seek adventure!

Mars needs volunteers and donations!
Please visit: MarsInitiative.org
Sign up today!
Future generations depend on our actions & choices.