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Student BMJ
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Student BMJ Medicine Doctor Applying Career News Views Advice Skills
Student BMJ Medicine Doctor Applying Career News Views Advice Skills

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Student BMJ's posts

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New foundation programme curriculum: What’s changed? bmj.co/2cnjzgB
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Test yourself with these mock questions for the situational judgment test http://bmj.co/2cnmvKb
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Are lots of exams at medical school a bad thing? http://student.bmj.com/student/view-article.html?id=sbmj.h6516
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What’s your fresher tribe? http://student.bmj.com/student/view-article.html?id=sbmj.i3545
During freshers’ week you may want to find out where you belong in the vast ecosystem that is medical school. Luckily, Student BMJ is on hand with some light hearted advice on the different tribes you may encounter, their strengths and weaknesses, and how you might fit in.
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Why owning up to mistakes is good practice http://student.bmj.com/student/view-article.html?id=sbmj.i1933
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From medicine to business http://bmj.co/29duQOo

I’ve noticed a surprising phenomenon in my medical school’s common room. The talk has been less about Saturday night escapades in the students union nightclub and more about the future of the medical profession. Specifically, I’ve been hearing medical students openly considering careers beyond medicine. Among my colleagues, both in Norwich and around the United Kingdom, investment banking and management consulting are often mentioned as possible careers.

I’m a graduate medical student and for six months was an investment banker in a large European firm. I’m therefore interested in how doctors perceive the business world, and I’m aware of some of the misconceptions around money, business skills, and work-life balance that medics have about this sector of work.
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Should more medical schools employ expert patient teachers? bmj.co/297sxkh

The use of plastic dummies to assess how medical students carry out a pelvic examination is a thing of the past at Oxford University. At this medical school, the speculum examination in the gynaecology objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) station is carried out by lay women, instead of using plastic models. Since August 2015, students have been assessed on their abilities to interact with and conduct a vaginal examination on clinical teaching associates (CTAs). These trained expert patients teach intimate examinations using their own bodies and give students feedback that you just don't get from a plastic pelvic model. Although assessment led by CTAs is novel, examination teaching by CTAs is not new. They have been teaching vaginal examination for several years in Oxford, and similar programmes have been running in the United Kingdom and the United States for decades. Researchers from King’s College London found in 2003 that students taught by gynaecology CTAs had higher assessment scores than those taught using only traditional teaching methods.
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Mark Dybul, executive director of the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria discusses his career in HIV research and the future of global health http://bmj.co/293UxX6

In 1985 I was trying to decide between English and theology, but I was grabbed by the front page of Time, which had a feature about the global AIDS epidemic. After that, my interest wouldn’t let go. My first job after medical school was based in San Francisco. Three people were dying a day from AIDS. The life of the city revolved around funerals and death. The stigma was incredible. I cared for dying teenagers, whose families had disowned them not just because they had HIV, but also because this is how they found out they were gay. But in the midst of this horror there was something beautiful, a growing solidarity with and acceptance of the gay community.
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What would you do if someone needed medical assistance on your elective? bmj.co/28V7wdx
Managing an acutely ill patient can be a demanding task even for experienced clinicians in well resourced countries. If you can do nothing more than make a scene safe and summon senior medical or emergency help quickly you will have made a beneficial intervention. Remember, your own safety and that of others is paramount, so remain within your clinical competence and be mindful of what could go wrong if you intervene further.
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How to revise for your clinical exams
http://student.bmj.com/student/view-article.html?id=sbmj.i2285

Establishing a good introductory and closing patter can earn you many marks, so it’s worth developing and practising. Everyone has their own style and so it’s useful to get feedback from different people. Acronyms like HIPEEP (Hand washing, Introduction, Permission, Explanation, Exposure, Positioning) can be a useful framework to build on. It’s also important to rehearse a closing sentence, which includes things such as thanking your patient, asking them to redress, and listing any further examinations or investigations you would do given more time.
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