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Gaetan Bertin
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I'd love to drive that
Peugeot 2008 DKR’s definitive combat livery
With a month-and-a-half remaining until the start of the 2015 Dakar, the Peugeot 2008 DKR is getting into the swing and has traded its initial all-carbon finish for its official colour scheme. This spectacular metamorphosis is an eloquent sign that the bestial machine is now fully prepared to take on its 4x4 rivals on the most punishing cross-country rally of them all. 

As the event’s January 4 start approaches, the commando teams at Peugeot, Red Bull and Total have ticked practically all the boxes of their respective checklists, and the revelation of the Peugeot 2008 DKR’s definitive livery was one of them! After spending seven months robed in black, the French engineers’ creation has now swapped its carbon finish for a far racier look based on a combination of blue, white and red which confirms that its competitive debut is imminent.

The thousands of kilometres the Peugeot 2008 DKR has covered in Morocco in recent months have boosted the morale of all those involved in this bold project. “The results of our test programme show that our technical concept is well founded,” notes Peugeot Sport Director Bruno Famin. “That said, this car is at a very early stage of its development, so it is important to remain cautious. Although we have big ambitions for this adventure, we are still tackling it with a great deal of humility. By deciding to kick off our cross-country rally programme with the toughest event imaginable, we will no doubt come across unforeseen obstacles and problems. It is consequently important to take things one step at a time. For our first attempt, our main objective is to get as many cars as possible as far as we possibly can.”

With just 48 days to go until the start of January’s Dakar, the team faces a busy final countdown. On November 20, the service trucks carrying all the necessary equipment and spares will be loaded onto the ship that will take them to Argentina. After that, the three rally cars will be built in readiness for their journey to South America by airfreight after one final test in Morocco, at the beginning of December. Meanwhile, the crews are due to undergo an intensive mechanical training course in order to prepare them for any emergency work they may need to carry out during the rally’s marathon leg when third-party servicing is prohibited.
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Peugeot 2008 DKR
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CITROËN UNVEILS NEW CROSSOVER, C3-XR, AT C 42

CITROËN is continuing its strategy of globalisation and asserting its position as a truly international automotive manufacturer. At the heart of this strategy is the Chinese market, which now represents more than one in four sales for the brand. It is for this important market that CITROËN has unveiled, at C_42 on the Champs Elysées, the new C3-XR, a compact SUV projecting robustness, elegance and dynamism.


Citroën is further accelerating its policy of developing sales in overseas markets and consolidating its status as a global brand. In recent months, this global approach has taken on a new dimension with sales worldwide up 7% in the first half of 2014, above the growth in the market (+4%).

https://3d-car-shows.com/citroen-unveils-new-crossover-c3-xr-at-c-42/

#Citroen   #Cars   #ParisMotorShow   #AutoShow   #CarShows  
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Citroen Paris Motor Show
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beau.

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Sincèrement, à part des marketers, qui prend le temps d'aller jusqu'au bout de l'experience?
L'idée n'est pas mauvaise. On joue sur l'ego des internautes et les "15 minutes of fame" donc potentiellement ca peut marcher.
Mais devoir passer 10 minutes à regarder des videos en flash avant de pouvoir voir ma tête sur la couv du mag, c'est un peu long.

Bien sur, on est dans "une experience utilisateur immersive", enfin... pour les 10% qui n'ont pas abandonné au bout de 3 minutes.

Si l'ego du visiteur etait flatté dès le début, en proposant d'apparaitre sur le magazine en entrée de parcours et non en but du parcours, je pense que les taux d'abandon seraient beaucoup plus faibles, mais là... je suis prêt à parier qu'ils sont horriblement élevés.

My £0.02

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Nice ad by Playstation

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Great read
(Sat01) What I Learned From Steve Jobs

Many people have explained what one can learn from Steve Jobs. But few, if any, of these people have been inside the tent and experienced first hand what it was like to work with him. I don’t want any lessons to be lost or forgotten, so here is my list of the top twelve lessons that I learned from Steve Jobs.

Experts are clueless.

Experts—journalists, analysts, consultants, bankers, and gurus can’t “do” so they “advise.” They can tell you what is wrong with your product, but they cannot make a great one. They can tell you how to sell something, but they cannot sell it themselves. They can tell you how to create great teams, but they only manage a secretary. For example, the experts told us that the two biggest shortcomings of Macintosh in the mid 1980s was the lack of a daisy-wheel printer driver and Lotus 1-2-3; another advice gem from the experts was to buy Compaq. Hear what experts say, but don’t always listen to them.

Customers cannot tell you what they need.

“Apple market research” is an oxymoron. The Apple focus group was the right hemisphere of Steve’s brain talking to the left one. If you ask customers what they want, they will tell you, “Better, faster, and cheaper”—that is, better sameness, not revolutionary change. They can only describe their desires in terms of what they are already using—around the time of the introduction of Macintosh, all people said they wanted was better, faster, and cheaper MS-DOS machines. The richest vein for tech startups is creating the product that you want to use—that’s what Steve and Woz did.

Jump to the next curve.

Big wins happen when you go beyond better sameness. The best daisy-wheel printer companies were introducing new fonts in more sizes. Apple introduced the next curve: laser printing. Think of ice harvesters, ice factories, and refrigerator companies. Ice 1.0, 2.0, and 3.0. Are you still harvesting ice during the winter from a frozen pond?

The biggest challenges beget best work.

I lived in fear that Steve would tell me that I, or my work, was crap. In public. This fear was a big challenge. Competing with IBM and then Microsoft was a big challenge. Changing the world was a big challenge. I, and Apple employees before me and after me, did their best work because we had to do our best work to meet the big challenges.

Design counts.

Steve drove people nuts with his design demands—some shades of black weren’t black enough. Mere mortals think that black is black, and that a trash can is a trash can. Steve was such a perfectionist—a perfectionist Beyond: Thunderdome—and lo and behold he was right: some people care about design and many people at least sense it. Maybe not everyone, but the important ones.

You can’t go wrong with big graphics and big fonts.

Take a look at Steve’s slides. The font is sixty points. There’s usually one big screenshot or graphic. Look at other tech speaker’s slides—even the ones who have seen Steve in action. The font is eight points, and there are no graphics. So many people say that Steve was the world’s greatest product introduction guy..don’t you wonder why more people don’t copy his style?

Changing your mind is a sign of intelligence.

When Apple first shipped the iPhone there was no such thing as apps. Apps, Steve decreed, were a bad thing because you never know what they could be doing to your phone. Safari web apps were the way to go until six months later when Steve decided, or someone convinced Steve, that apps were the way to go—but of course. Duh! Apple came a long way in a short time from Safari web apps to “there’s an app for that.”

“Value” is different from “price.”

Woe unto you if you decide everything based on price. Even more woe unto you if you compete solely on price. Price is not all that matters—what is important, at least to some people, is value. And value takes into account training, support, and the intrinsic joy of using the best tool that’s made. It’s pretty safe to say that no one buys Apple products because of their low price.

A players hire A+ players.

Actually, Steve believed that A players hire A players—that is people who are as good as they are. I refined this slightly—my theory is that A players hire people even better than themselves. It’s clear, though, that B players hire C players so they can feel superior to them, and C players hire D players. If you start hiring B players, expect what Steve called “the bozo explosion” to happen in your organization.

Real CEOs demo.

Steve Jobs could demo a pod, pad, phone, and Mac two to three times a year with millions of people watching, why is it that many CEOs call upon their vice-president of engineering to do a product demo? Maybe it’s to show that there’s a team effort in play. Maybe. It’s more likely that the CEO doesn’t understand what his/her company is making well enough to explain it. How pathetic is that?

Real CEOs ship.

For all his perfectionism, Steve could ship. Maybe the product wasn’t perfect every time, but it was almost always great enough to go. The lesson is that Steve wasn’t tinkering for the sake of tinkering—he had a goal: shipping and achieving worldwide domination of existing markets or creation of new markets. Apple is an engineering-centric company, not a research-centric one. Which would you rather be: Apple or Xerox PARC?

Marketing boils down to providing unique value.

Think of a 2 x 2 matrix. The vertical axis measures how your product differs from the competition. The horizontal axis measures the value of your product. Bottom right: valuable but not unique—you’ll have to compete on price. Top left: unique but not valuable—you’ll own a market that doesn’t exist. Bottom left: not unique and not value—you’re a bozo. Top right: unique and valuable—this is where you make margin, money, and history. For example, the iPod was unique and valuable because it was the only way to legally, inexpensively, and easily download music from the six biggest record labels.

Bonus: Some things need to be believed to be seen. When you are jumping curves, defying/ignoring the experts, facing off against big challenges, obsessing about design, and focusing on unique value, you will need to convince people to believe in what you are doing in order to see your efforts come to fruition. People needed to believe in Macintosh to see it become real. Ditto for iPod, iPhone, and iPad. Not everyone will believe—that’s okay. But the starting point of changing the world is changing a few minds. This is the greatest lesson of all that I learned from Steve.

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Is it just me or did Youtube / Google completely forget to add a +1 button to the Harry Potter Premiere Live Show Page http://www.youtube.com/harrypotter?x=fr?feature=ticker

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Dédicace (vous vous reconnaitrez)
Lorie Week End

Hey Web Analytics People!
La variable "n" du referrer de G+ semble être incrémentale à chaque clic sur un item partagé via G+. Déjà + de 1 309 533 253 829 clics sur des éléments partagés depuis G+? Possible.
BTW, pour identifier G+ dans les sources de trafic, c'est "http://www.google.com/url?sa=z" à priori.
En dehors de ça, rien de très intéressant dans le referrer.
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