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CADCE
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'Rapper Gucci Mane joins us to discuss his memoir, The Autobiography of Gucci Mane. Born in rural Bessemer, Alabama, Radric Delantic Davis became Gucci Mane in East Atlanta. He recalls his roots in Alabama, the trap house and the studio where he found his voice, and reflects on his career.' -- The Leonard Lopate Show

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“From the bottom will the genius come that makes our ability to live with each other possible. I believe that with all my heart.” These are the words of the Pulitzer Prize-winning Dominican-American writer Junot Díaz. His hope is fiercely reality-based, a product of centuries lodged in his body of African-Caribbean suffering, survival, and genius.' -- +On Being

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'Yarimar Bonilla, associate professor of anthropology and Caribbean studies at Rutgers University, a visiting scholar at the Russell Sage Foundation, and author of Non-Sovereign Futures: French Caribbean Politics in the Wake of Disenchantment (University of Chicago Press, 2015), talks about the colonial history- and present - of the Caribbean islands hit hard by Irma, and how that affects residents, and the islands' hurricane preparedness and recovery.' -- The Brian Lehrer Show

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'Taylor Swift is a star of many faces – known variously as a country music darling, a pop music sensation, a forlorn damsel, the powerful leader of her girl squad and, perhaps above all else, a savvy marketer. Less well-known is her reputation within the alt-right, where she's become the object of affection for white supremacists. While few suspect Taylor Swift of harboring any sympathy for the white supremacists who love her, the affection she's garnered raises some questions: Why her? Why now? And, in the wake of Charlottesville, does she have a responsibility to denounce their hateful ideology? Brooke speaks with Mitchell Sunderland, Senior Staff Writer at Vice, who first broke the story of Taylor Swift’s alt-right following last year.' -- On The Media

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'Since the Inauguration, in January, there’s been a kind of protest renaissance for those on the left and some in the center of American politics; at rallies and marches, they’ve dusted off chants and songs that became symbols of resistance during the civil-rights and Vietnam eras. But many of these protesters weren’t alive in the sixties, and the songs of their parents’ or grandparents’ generations may not resonate for them. “Primer for a Failed Superpower” was a concert performance, organized by the theatre company the TEAM, that mixed classic protest songs with contemporary anthems, all sung by a cast that spanned generational lines from boomers to teens. The New Yorker’s Vinson Cunningham talked to two young performers, Maxwell Vice and Logan Rozos, about how that generational divide played out, and what public protest is worth in the age of social media.' -- The New Yorker Radio Hour

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'Grammy-nominated and Platinum-selling artist Musiq Soulchild is a hip-hop soul artist that has built a reputation for being musically gifted, beat boxing for MC’s, free styling on the open mic circuit or just performing acappella for strangers on the streets. Deeply inspired by the R&B/Soul sound of the 70’s, he uses the name “Soulchild” as a way to show respect and admiration to his biggest musical influences such as Stevie Wonder, Donny Hathaway, Marvin Gaye and many others. His new album, Feel the Real, takes listeners on a melodic journey through the essence of Hip Hop Soul in true Musiq Soulchild fashion.' -- BUILD Series

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'Ever since President Donald Trump announced he was running for president in 2015, late-night television shows have taken on a new tone. Programs like The Late Show with Stephen Colbert and Late Night with Seth Meyers have adopted more political rhetoric, while The Daily Show continues to offer political satire with a diverse staff. State of Things host Frank Stasio talks about the recent politicization of late-night TV with regular contributors Natalie Bullock Brown, professor of film and broadcast media at St. Augustine’s University in Raleigh, and Mark Anthony Neal, chair of the department of African and African American studies at Duke University in Durham. They also discuss the legacy of comedian and activist Dick Gregory who died last month.' -- WUNC 91.5

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Cartoonist and Satirist Keith Knight sits down with Left of Black host Mark Anthony Neal to talk about his latest books They Shoot Black People Don't They?: 20 Years of Police Brutality Cartoons and Jake the Fake Keeps it Real with by Craig Robinson and Adam Mansbach.

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'Luis Perez-Brava, a professor at MIT, thinks that we've probably been watching too many Terminator movies for us to really understand what AI actually is. It will (hopefully) (knock on wood) be much less hyper-intelligent humanoid killing machines and more of a sidekick role. Perez-Brava brings up a great point that many in the AI world gloss over: that we saw this kind of so-called "job killing" a century ago when Henry Ford created automation in the workplace; Luis posits that it won't be that much different than we're used to and that mankind should be creative enough to figure out how to assimilate human jobs and AI side by side.' -- +Big Think

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'At a time when women, people of color and homosexuals were confined to the margins of society, Lorraine Hansberry (1930-1965), best known for A Raisin in the Sun, boldly challenged U.S. society to live up to its ideals. Sighted Eyes/Feeling Heart, directed by Tracy Strain tells the dramatic story of the young, gifted and black woman who chose words to fight injustice—on stage and off.' -- ITVS
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