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CADCE
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'Henry Threadgill wants to know how to build the house. Whether it's Moby Dick or jazz composition, the 72-year-old jazz composer and multi-instrumentalist has spent his life figuring out what goes into building the greatest works of arts. At three years of age, he started teaching himself to play piano by mimicking the boogie-woogie on the radio. From there, he set to figuring out how to compose his own music. Recently awarded the Pulitzer Prize, Threadgill talks with Helga Davis about giving license to your imagination in order to create, the life energy that connects a performer to his creations, and pushing yourself to go beyond excellence to greatness.' -- +WQXR

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"Still fresh, funny, and irreverent after eighteen years, Joan Morgan's When Chickenheads Come Home to Roost gives voice to the most intimate thoughts of the post-Civil Rights, post-feminist, post-soul generation." 

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'In November of 2016 NFL players Anquan Boldin, Andrew Hawkins, Malcolm Jenkins, Josh McCown and Glover Quin met with members of Congress to discuss issues related to law enforcement and race. In this installment of the Players’ POV, three of the players discuss how these issues have impacted their lives.' -- +The Players' Tribune 

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'America has a split personality, and the country it wants to be is constantly being foiled by the country that it is. In an ideal world, says Jelani Cobb, there is a way of using power that does not entail the oppression and exploitation of other people. But how do we get there?' -- +Big Think 

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'Mr. Jarreau was that something more elusive than stints on the Pop charts; for more than 40 years Mr. Jarreau danced on the margins of Jazz, R&B and Pop to create a career that was as unique as his vocal style -- a style which might be best described as fits of facial contortion and spastic movements embodied in the finest of vocal improvisational skills.'

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'Talib Kweli performs a set as part of WNYC's 11th Annual Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. celebration at the Apollo Theater, "Where Do We Go From Here?: MLK and the Future of Inclusion"'. -- +WNYC 

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'James Baldwin’s final and unfinished project Remember This House was an effort to capture the lives of three of his closest friends, all assassinated: Medgar Evers, Malcolm X and Martin Luther King, Jr.. Filmmaker Raoul Peck envisions the manuscript Baldwin never finished in his Oscar-nominated documentary, “I Am Not Your Negro". The film is a radically nuanced examination of race in America, using Baldwin’s original words and flood of rich archival material that connects the past struggles for racial justice to those of the present. WNYC editor Rebecca Carroll hosted an unconventional conversation with Peck about the prescience of Baldwin's work and his indictment of American racism as its own moral monster.' -- +The Greene Space at WNYC & WQXR 

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'In this excerpt from the Independent Lens documentary Birth of a Movement, silent film director D.W. Griffith, "at the top of his game," is introduced to the book The Clansman: A Historical Romance of the Ku Klux Klan, by Thomas Dixon. When The Clansman became a stage play, its pro-KKK, "viciously racist" (according to Harvard historian David Blight) point of view resulted in protests and race riots -- foreshadowing what was to come when Griffith adapted it into the film The Birth of a Nation.' 

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'James Baldwin died in 1987, but his quiet rage speaks eloquently to our times. In the Oscar-nominated documentary “I Am Not Your Negro," director Raoul Peck creates a film essay from Baldwin’s words, using footage from past and present with narration by the actor Samuel Jackson. A key part of the film is the author's unfinished manuscript about three martyrs of the civil rights movement — Medgar Evers, Malcolm X, and Martin Luther King Jr.' -- +WNYC — Thom Powers and Raphaela Neihausen

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Kelly Norman Ellis reads her poem "Raised by Women" from the film Coal Black Voices, which is produced and directed by Fred Johnson and Jean Donohue.
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