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Owen Peters
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A new study done by researchers at National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) has found that deoxygenation due to climate change would become more severe between 2030 and 2040.

The findings of the study were published in the American Geophysical Union journal "Global Biological Cycles." The researchers said that the loss of oxygen will affect certain marine life very badly as it will make it harder for them to breathe.

It is to be noted that the supply of oxygen is received by the oceans from the surface via the atmosphere or from phytoplankton, which release oxygen in the water by photosynthesis. When the oceans are warmed they absorb less oxygen and the speed of marine life gets slow.

"Since oxygen concentrations in the ocean naturally vary depending on variations in winds and temperature at the surface, it's been challenging to attribute any deoxygenation to climate change. This new study tells us when we can expect the effect from climate change to overwhelm the natural variability," said lead author Matthew Long of NCAR.

Curtis Deutsch, associate professor at the University of Washington's School of Oceanography, said: "As the climate goes up, the amount of oxygen will go down, but it's really hard to look in the ocean to see that change."

Deutsch and scientists at the National Center for Atmospheric Research and the Georgia Institute of Technology used an earth system modeling approach to map out the changing oxygen levels in the oceans through the end of the 21st century.

"In some parts, you can actually detect a change relatively early, like right around now. The signature of the climate being warmer is creating something that is unlike anything that is seen in history. Other places it is much harder to detect, either oxygen is decreasing slowly or there is so much [natural] variation. So basically the results depend on where you are," Deutsch said.
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A new study done by researchers at National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) has found that deoxygenation due to climate change would become more severe between 2030 and 2040.

The findings of the study were published in the American Geophysical Union journal "Global Biological Cycles." The researchers said that the loss of oxygen will affect certain marine life very badly as it will make it harder for them to breathe.

It is to be noted that the supply of oxygen is received by the oceans from the surface via the atmosphere or from phytoplankton, which release oxygen in the water by photosynthesis. When the oceans are warmed they absorb less oxygen and the speed of marine life gets slow.

"Since oxygen concentrations in the ocean naturally vary depending on variations in winds and temperature at the surface, it's been challenging to attribute any deoxygenation to climate change. This new study tells us when we can expect the effect from climate change to overwhelm the natural variability," said lead author Matthew Long of NCAR.

Curtis Deutsch, associate professor at the University of Washington's School of Oceanography, said: "As the climate goes up, the amount of oxygen will go down, but it's really hard to look in the ocean to see that change."

Deutsch and scientists at the National Center for Atmospheric Research and the Georgia Institute of Technology used an earth system modeling approach to map out the changing oxygen levels in the oceans through the end of the 21st century.

"In some parts, you can actually detect a change relatively early, like right around now. The signature of the climate being warmer is creating something that is unlike anything that is seen in history. Other places it is much harder to detect, either oxygen is decreasing slowly or there is so much [natural] variation. So basically the results depend on where you are," Deutsch said.
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Australian Marc Leishman has joined his compatriot Adam Scott by withdrawing from Olympic consideration, citing bad health of his wife, who is currently recovering from a near-fatal illness.

Leishman on Thursday declared that he was unavailable for the prestigious event. "It is with deep regret that I have informed Golf Australia that I will be unable to represent my country in the upcoming 2016 Summer Olympic Games in Brazil," Leishman said.

"Many of you may know that last April my children and I almost lost my wife, Audrey, to toxic shock syndrome. Since then Audrey has been prone to infection and is far removed from 100 percent recovery of her immune system. We have consulted with Audrey's physician and due to her ongoing recovery from toxic shock and potential risks associated with the transmission of the Zika virus, it was a difficult yet easy decision not to participate."

Leishman missed the 2015 Masters to be by her side after getting only five per cent chance of survival. While Scott was slammed from some quarters, including golf legends Gary Player and Jack Nicklaus and Olympic legend Dawn Fraser, Leishman was hopeful people would support his decision. "I cannot risk placing her health in jeopardy," he continued.

"The Masters and the Olympics are the two biggest tournaments to which a golfer can be invited; however, my family will always come before golf. Finally, I hope that my fellow countrymen understand why I have made this decision. I hope none of them are ever in a position to have to do the same," he added.
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