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B.G. Wiehle
Attended University of Western Ontario
Lived in Stratford ON Canada
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B.G. Wiehle

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In Hungary, there appears to have been a government mandate to get the population immunized, starting about 1809, but I have not seen this requirement specifically referenced. I have indexed several Lutheran church registers from Transylvania (Hungary/Romania), dating to the mid-1700s, which include smallpox immunization records, for the children of the village. The earlier immunizations seem to have been done by a doctor, in an annual visit, over the course of a couple of days (depending on numbers to be inocculated). The pastor or his assistent recorded names and ages and signed off as witness. Later immunizations were recorded in the baptism register.
A scar "by inoculation" on this 1809 Seaman's Proof of Citizenship likely refers to an inoculation against smallpox. Those with a knowledge of the fight to eradicate smallpox will remember that vaccines were around in 180...
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B.G. Wiehle

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Does anyone know of an academic paper or case study that addresses the topic of immigration vs temporary work stays in the USA between 1895-1915?
My research of U.S. records focuses on immigrants from my ancestral villages and their descendants. Passenger lists include many people who immigrated AND those who entered the U.S. but only stayed for a few years. I recognize that each case was unique and decisions were dependent on family relationships, economics, etc.
However, I wonder if there are patterns that I may have missed among the people in my genealogy database, and whether they (as a group) were different from the average.
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What patterns are evident in your (Rusyn?) family members? Such as: When did the first immigrants from your area of interest start to emigrate? Were they making multiple trips? What proportion of the married men brought their families vs coming alone? How did the families deal with the separations? What triggered returns? If they married in the U.S., was the partner from the same village or region? Where did your people "cluster" in the U.S.? What mutual support or social groups were organized by them?
Very few Transylvanian Saxons emigrated before 1895. It's hard to get a feel for how many of the working-age men were away at any single point in time since we don't have returning passenger manifests, but my impression is that more than half had made at least one trip of some duration. Only a few brought their families; most worked a few years, then returned to retire, pay off mortgages, or if they were young, to marry. If they married in the U.S., they were more likely to stay, although sometimes the first child triggered a return. Long-time separations caused a lot of divorces. Many children left behind if both parents were away, grew up not knowing parents and younger siblings. Main destinations were the steel cities of Pennsylvania, Ohio, Indiana, Michigan & Illinois - Cleveland OH, Youngstown OH, New Castle PA, Pittsburgh PA, Gary IN, etc.
The book "Saxons through Seventeen Centuries" (John Foisel, 1936) includes a couple of chapters on the immigrants to the U.S., but these deal with church and social organizations.
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Now that the 15th Anniversary access to Ancestry is over (Thank-you and Congratulations Ancestry!), I can resume my subscription hiatus. Since U.S. resources cover only a portion of my research needs, I don't need to keep Ancestry constantly available. I buy access a month or so at a time, and use the gaps not just to save money, but also to consolidate my research finds, work with other resources, and catch up on non-genealogy activities. When I do search in Ancestry during these times, I can bookmark the results screen in Zotero (a Firefox add-on) for later follow-up.
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Most genealogists probably have some focus to their research, whether its their ancestors, all descendants of a progenitor, a one-name study, or some mixture that works for them. Nobody pursues the ancestors/descendants of everyone that they find in records associated with the people they are interested in.
For my research, I use a custom event called "Other relationships" where I can document people who are linked to "my" people but whose identities are ambiguous or incomplete or who I don't want to include as individuals in the database.
I suspect there are other solutions in use.
Question: What do you do with evidence pertaining to someone associated with, but not in, your scope of research?
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Have her in circles
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B.G. Wiehle

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Recently, I was out at Ford Cemetery, near my parents' home, and saw one of the barn quilts that my brother had told me about. I knew that there was a local (Elgin County, Ontario) project for a barn quilt trail (inspired by the Temiskaming and Wardsville trails) and now they have a website showcasing all the locations and quilt designs [http://www.barnquilttrails.ca/] . According to Wikipedia "Quilt Trail", the idea started in Ohio in 2001.
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In the last month, FamilySearch has added almost 3 million indexed records to "United States, World War II Draft Registration Cards, 1942" (current total 7,556,245). Indexed records and images for Arkansas, California, Michigan, and Pennsylvania are now available. PA images were already browsable, but access to the other states is new to FS.
States where FamilySearch has images and Ancestry does not are Louisiana, Michigan, Nevada, Oklahoma, Texas, and Wisconsin. Also, coverages for Ohio and California are different.
At this time, only Ancestry has Alaska, Idaho, Oregon, Virginia and Washington. 15 other states have no coverage yet.
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My grandfather's first cousin Michael Bayer (1891-1918) died in the First World War in France as a private in the U.S. Army. From my transcription of the Dunesdorf church registers (FHL microfilm 1417956), I knew that he had been re-interred 17 Apr 1922 in the cemetery in his hometown of Dunesdorf (now Daneş, Romania). I had wondered how that was arranged. Today, I got a clue that addresses that question - there is a letter from the War Department attached to Andrew Bayer's 1922 passport application (Ancestry.com. U.S. Passport Applications, 1795-1925) regarding the disposition of his brother's body. Wow!
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B.G. Wiehle

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Just starting out with Google+, lurking, building my circles, editing my profile
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Have her in circles
43 people
Keith Unger's profile photo
Dr. Brian Leverich's profile photo
Dallan Quass's profile photo
Michele Simmons Lewis's profile photo
Education
  • University of Western Ontario
    B.Sc (Biology)
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Female
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Introduction
I spend a lot of time working on my extended family tree. That includes many Transylvanian Saxon families that are potentially relatives as well as known descendants of my ancestors.
I have a freepages website at Rootsweb: Unsere Deutsche Wurzeln - Our German Roots
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Ich bin viel mit Familienforschung der größeren Verwandtschaft beschäftigt. Darunter kommen viele Siebenbürgisch-sächische Familien die nur anverwandt sind. Meine Webseiten kann man finden durch den oben gegebenen Link.

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Previously
Stratford ON Canada - London ON Canada - Rodney ON Canada