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Kay C
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Kay C

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Just published a new site yesterday for a local Halloween movement that I've been helping to coordinate. Let me know what you think, and please share!
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Bob Strassel Jr.'s profile photo
 
Nice job with the website. What a wonderful idea!
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Kay C

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I don't normally share my own blog entries, but since we've got infographic going on today it's worth a mention. I'm pretty pleased with it.
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Kay C

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This may be the silliest Government-sponsored study I've read in a while.

"Popular culture abounds with uses for duct tape in duct tape calendars, 101 uses for duct tape, duct tape books, etc. Unfortunately, it appears that duct tape should not actually be used to seal ducts."

"Can Duct Tape Take the Heat?" http://epb.lbl.gov/publications/lbl-41434.pdf
14 pages.
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Adam Burley's profile photoHarena Atria's profile photo
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Especially when it's either bright green or tie-dye! :D
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Kay C

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This is exactly the type of historical Chicago trivia that makes me happy. http://www.northbynorthwestern.com/story/ask-nbn-sheridan-road/
A daily newsmagazine of campus life, culture and entertainment for Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois.
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Kay C

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True facts: I was quite the little steam tunnel spelunker back in college. I've been fascinated by the Chicago Tunnel Company's extensive narrow-gauge train system running beneath the Loop and its surrounding areas for over a decade now. Some great historic footage and a nice overview on the system can be seen in this vid.

Unfortunately Phil O'Keefe's wonderful site about the CTC has vanished from the web, but it can still be found archived in the Wayback Machine at http://web.archive.org/web/20041010061028/http://www.ameritech.net/users/chicagotunnel/tunnel1.html

If anyone can find a copy of the CERA 2002 edition of Bruce Moffat's Forty Feet Below, now unfortunately out of print, I'd love to take a peek at it.
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Tiffany Shu Jaruda's profile photoAdam Burley's profile photoAdam Cook's profile photo
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subterrenian railroads and non-passenger systems have always fascinated me. Some of the television productions and websites detailing (sometimes illicit) tours are amazing!
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Kay C

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The posh Streeterville neighborhood of Chicago started its existence underwater as the dubiously independent "District of Lake Michigan." A character named George "Cap" Streeter accidentally crashed his boat on a sandbar 450 feet off the shores of Lake Michigan in the early 19th century. He subsequently swindled numerous Chicagoans into dumping landfill and purchasing tracts to increase his offshore "district" until the underwater gap was filled and his sandbar increased to 186 acres of land.

After years of trying unsuccessfully to get Streeter to abandon his two story house and squatters' district, the courts finally ruled that the area was in fact under the domain of the state of Illinois and forcibly removed him and his family.

This article from the NY Times of 1902 describing the eventual ouster of Streeter from his domain reminds me of certain recent activities, plus or minus the use of pepper spray.

For more on Streeter himself, check out capstreeter.com - excellent research.
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Kay C

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This is gorgeous, compelling writing. It starts with Umber (1) and proceeds, so far, up to Umber (43).

The narrator discovers a trove of antique photos at an estate sale. Her life is gradually devoured by the world of the family portrayed within.

http://circuitousroute.wordpress.com/2012/02/21/umber-1/
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Kay C

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From the Oddly Compelling department: I don't know exactly how I wound up here, but I now know more about sock varieties than I ever really wanted to.

http://ohioline.osu.edu/hyg-fact/5000/5544.html
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Kay C's profile photoAdam Burley's profile photo
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Makes sense :)
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Kay C

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With the NATO summit occurring in Chicago this weekend the downtown area is not quite locked down, but pretty dead. I spent about 4 creepy hours walking around with my phone cam.
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Adam Cook's profile photoKay C's profile photo
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Kay C
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Yours look great! (Spooky. But great!) You went further south than I did - decided to go to the NATO3 rally and missed empty Lake Shore Drive. (Again! Missed it during Snowpocalypse '11 too.) It was like 28 Days Later done Chicago-style.
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Kay C

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This is a fantastic story of growing up in Lawndale in the late 1940's. Love these little slices of Chicago history!
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Tiffany Shu Jaruda's profile photoKay C's profile photo
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Kay C
 
Very popular websites face the same problem that government facilities do - by designing a site that's accessible to everyone, everyone winds up dealing with certain annoyances. The more you get other people involved with your life, the tougher it gets to control what gets said about you and shared about you, and with whom.

I'm in a particularly precarious position as my entire business relies on being able to appear agreeable and positive to as large a swath of the population as possible so that they will trust me to assist them with making very large purchases. This means that I have to be pretty tight on privacy and strict with filtering.

The interesting thing to me is all of the side economies and projects that have grown up around as parasites of these enormous social networks. Not just the games, but add-ons like Social Fixer for Facebook, Hootsuite for meta-posting to multiple social networks, etc.

I think the social media concept may be too diluted with top level options now for anyone else to make a viable entry. Everything I've seen come up lately has been derivative. Pinterest is twitter with pictures. Tumblr is twitter with threaded conversations. Diaspora is Facebook distributed across many servers without the ownership issues. LinkedIn is Facebook for business people. All of them are derivatives of Myspace, and before that Friendster, and before that places like Livejournal and Xanga.

Personal data is a major moneymaker, and unfortunately these sites are driven by capitalism more than the earliest sites on the web, which were more motivated by the need to share information instantly regardless of profit. However, data once released online is never truly private. For example, a quick tracert shows that this comment is passing through 10 servers on its way to Gplus, and will probably pass through just as many on its way from Gplus to your eyes. Every time it hops from server to server there's a chance for interception, decryption, and data kidnapping. That's how the net has always worked.

Admittedly most people aren't out there sniffing packets as they traverse the web. They'll absorb what they can find with a few mouse clicks and not go much further. The fear of "who's accessing my info" takes two forms - one is "what happens if my friends see stuff they're not supposed to" and the other is "what happens if big brother can see everything?"

The former concern is easy to take care of with filtering and using things like Facebook's photo-untagging and privacy controls. The latter is more difficult to control. If the government/corporations/skynet want to snoop on us, fair play to them, they own the wires. But. I own a site with only 4000 members. Even at that level it simply all blends together and the only things that stand out are the superstars and the worst offenders. I can only imagine what it must be like for a government agent trying to sort through the din of millions of people to find the right data they need. I'd imagine that much like a deep sea trawler, most of what filters through their nets passes right back out again - only the meaty stuff is retained.

Should I start a new social network? I don't think I'm really social enough. I'm better at kibitzing from the side about web design philosophy :) I appreciate you thinking that I could, though!
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Kay C

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These are beautiful. Disassembled bits of older technology, meticulously displayed and then chaotically tumbled. It's the order of the images that makes me happy as much as the subject matter.
Everyone has a piece of the puzzle - but does it float
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Cad'ika Orade's profile photo
 
A combination of two great loves: Old tech and taking things apart. That was beautiful.
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Kay C

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Nice clear analysis of what's going on with PROTECT IP and SOPA, written from the perspective of a photographer and blogger for Mental Floss. There is absolutely no reason why intellectual property violations should be considered felonies.
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Brief? You expect me to be brief? I don't think that's possible. You see, it all started when...
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Realtor, Web Developer, Tech support.