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BROOMEJENKINS
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EXPLORE - THINK - DO
EXPLORE - THINK - DO

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Pleased to show two recent product launches with a few more to follow later this year.

https://mailchi.mp/78af62b9d031/broomejenkins-latest-news-1523709
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I doubt there will ever be a time when the use of open plan office design becomes a truly outmoded approach, as it provides flexibility. Increasingly, sub-architectural ways are being developed to adapt locations and settings to suit the worker and activity. Propst described the office as a 'facility based on change' in the 1960's, and despite fad or trend it is still true today. However, you may find the attached interesting......https://www.fastcompany.com/90218754/in-defense-of-open-offices?utm_source=postup&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Co.Design%20Daily&position=5&partner=newsletter&campaign_date=08152018
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With around 22% of WeWorks membership being companies with more than 250 employees, it is not surprising that they are now offering unbranded, private spaces for larger clients as the attached article reports.

Does this mean that the club based co-working space will become a short-lived trend with space providers becoming more like conventional landlords?

In the early 2000's there was a rush to send services off-shore, outsourcing to save money. Some found it added complexity and reduced quality and brought the services back in-house.

I would be interested to know what others think about the longevity of space as a service.

https://www.recode.net/2018/8/8/17664640/wework-hq-branding-real-estate-office-space
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Pleased to see the Bisley on-line shop is now Live and that Stage is a featured product.

https://www.bisley.com/shop/collections/stage/
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This is an interesting development of AI and robotics, helped by the fact that it is designed to operate in zero gravity.

https://www.fastcodesign.com/90177814/how-ibm-designed-a-floating-robot-head-to-help-out-around-the-iss
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I remember being incredibly struck by the many differences between European trade shows and Neocon the first time I attended almost 30 years ago. Attending most years ever since, it is interesting to consider how the show has changed and how it reflects global or European trends more than it did, and how some ‘trends’ seem to have been 30 years in the making.

Back then, the exhibits and delegates were conservative and corporate, the focus was on fixed, panelled workstations and there was very little evidence of European design influence, apart from possibly Davis, who I think had an arrangement with Renz.

If my memory serves me well, at my first Neocon, Steelcase were displaying a new daring concept called ‘Personal Harbours’ and Herman Miller had a display designed by Tom Newhouse about the ‘domestication of the workplace’ - both familiar and very evident trends we see today. At my first Neocon I was struck by the way products that appeared to be very similar were promoted differently by slick presentations that introduced me to words and ideas like ‘hotelling’, ‘the knowledge worker’ and ‘permeable privacy’. It showed me how the US manufacturers had a different approach, wrapping the product with a strategic narrative to make the decision to buy less subjective and less about style. To me, this was in stark contrast to the way Europeans launched a new product by mainly celebrating form and ‘design’.

Some years ago, the Merchandise Mart, where Neocon is held, added temporary exhibition space in addition to the permanent showrooms, thereby opening the event to smaller non-US firms and many far eastern component suppliers. As a result, Neocon has two distinct parts with companies occupying the permanent showrooms having the benefit of a permanent, higher quality environment.

Physically the Mart has gone through various changes over the years, but it remains a massive Art Deco block arranged over 14 floors. So unlike European events held in exhibition halls that tend to be ‘horizontal’, Neocon is vertical occupying several floors from 3 to 14 with gaps in between. This means that there are endless queues for the overcrowded elevators or the need to climb countless stairs.

Moving on to the present, this week has seen the 50th Neocon, which today has less of that corporate style, is more eclectic and has a stronger European influence in terms of trends, styles and designers working for US manufacturers. UK and European Manufacturers are also better represented, which for me underlines the global nature of culture and trade, regardless of tariffs or protectionist politics.

Looking at the products on show, the fixed cubicle workstation has made way for height adjustable, flexible work-settings, lots of upholstery, tables of different heights and shapes and open shelf storage, rather than closed lateral files.

In terms of materials and finishes, colours ranged from the bright and pastel to the earthy and rich. Painted steel was largely hidden making way for textures like wood, felts, plaited leather and ‘Lloyd Loom’ style rattan weave. Nature and sustainability were strong, visually and ideologically, but then this trend has been growing in prominence for some time.

The desire to move away from the conventional workstation and create convivial work settings with upholstery, and the need for a mix of open access and occasional privacy connect directly with ideas seen at my first Neocon in 1989. The aforementioned domestication of the office, permeable privacy and personal harbours remain evident today. So why are we still saying the same things or chasing the same ideas 30 years on? Well I think the ideas shown back then tapped into implicit human need, and only become possible recently due to various socio-economic changes, as well as changes in attitude to the workplace. The enabler of course is IT and communications, which in real terms has changed the need for an office building to be a place unlike the home, where specialist physical resources like computers and filing cabinets are kept, to being a place with similarities to the home and a place to create a community for people.

The impact of new ways of working on most workers is subtle, with the majority still working at a fixed pre-assigned workstation most of the time. Change may be slow, but it is happening and shows like Neocon help to exchange and stimulate ideas and chart the rate of change. As designers, we are interested in the incubation of new ideas and how to convert them into useful products that are valued by the user and successful for the manufacturer. Design matters to us, to our clients and the people we serve.
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Office screen specialists Icon have launched the third product in their 'Liberate Trilogy'.
Bedouin is a free-standing mobile screen.
Working closely with Icon, BroomeJenkins designed Bedouin to be used singularly or in small clusters subject to need. It nests when not in use, and comes in two heights and a range of fabric finishes. See more at: https://lnkd.in/eMHAAky
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I had an interesting and enjoyable day with the second year Product Design Group (PD2) at Bournemouth University. They presented the results of a live project I have been involved with, exploring workplace wellbeing as a range of issues including, activity, nutrition, rest, workforce demographics and environment.

I was interested to see the depth of investigation in a short space of time, as well as the resulting ideas that addressed both physical and emotional needs of the worker. Well done PD2.
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I can understand the economic drive by low cost airlines to try and create what is in effect a 'standing class' of air passengers, but is it right?
Air travel is caught between the nostalgia for the golden age of travel, with the reality of the low cost mass market of today. There are enough corners cut in terms of service and comfort in air travel already, but apart from the discomfort of standing astride a saddle for two hours, access in and out of these 'seats' is likely to be difficult. At what point do we as passengers accept that flying is a costly affair, and it should be wrong to fly from London to Madrid for less than a train fare from London to Manchester.
https://www.fastcodesign.com/90168628/the-airplane-saddle-is-a-standing-seat-for-super-economy-flight?utm_source=postup&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Fast%20Company%20Daily&position=4&partner=newsletter&campaign_date=04202018
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When Mix Media Ltd asked our Director Barry Jenkins what he would take to a desert island he selected coffee and gin made in Chichester as well as the 1966 Adjustable Chaise by Richard Schultz. Find the full selection on the Mix website http://www.mixinteriors.com/desert-island-desks-with-barry-jenkins/ #BroomeJenkins #BarryJenkins #MixMedia
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