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BROOMEJENKINS
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EXPLORE - THINK - DO
EXPLORE - THINK - DO

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This shows how we can still draw from nature in the way Joseph Paxton did with his design for the Crystal Palace. Whereas he pushed glass and cast iron, this example uses drones, robots and carbon fibres.

https://www.dezeen.com/2017/04/12/icd-itke-research-pavilion-university-stuttgart-germany-carbon-fibre-robots-drones/?li_source=LI&li_medium=rhs_block_2

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Workplace or youth club?
Are the familiar and somewhat unconventional trappings of so called 'creative workplaces' genuine benefits for those who work there, or merely a faddish veneer?
https://inews.co.uk/distractions/offbeat/quirky-office-furniture-found-annoy-office-staff/ 

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This is an interesting development in rapid manufacture. I am sure it will get better, but for now seems to be limited to making 'nets' with the cross-section being determined by the shape of the nozzle.

https://www.forbes.com/sites/alexknapp/2017/04/24/your-next-set-of-office-furniture-might-be-3d-printed/#5623b8b034c1

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Stage - the furniture system we designed with Bisley can be used in many environments including retail.

http://www.bisley.com/en-uk/news/stage-in-the-hoos

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Rove tub chair shown at Clerkenwell Design Week May 2016.
Designed by BroomeJenkins for Connection
Watch the animation.

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Rove is a new tub chair designed by BroomeJenkins for Connection, launched today at Clerkenwell Design Week.
It creates a micro work environment with storage below the seat and a moveable tablet that can be adjusted to suite left and right handed users.
It can be used in a range of applications from corporate to education environments.
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2016-05-24
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There is no doubt that the continual march of progress will lead us to AI at some point, making a significant impact on the way we live and work. 
Just like the spread of the PC meant we all needed keyboard skills and the 'typing pool' was consigned to history. As IT has developed, we have seen different skills such as book keeping, type setting and spelling, being packaged into software applications making 'experts' of us all, thereby ending the need for different specialist jobs.
So far software has simplified the 'mechanics' of the office, like the creating, publishing and filing of documents. AI potentially is a bigger threat if it replaces the creative element, the human content. I am not sure that it will, but it is clear that the design of the workplace has to be less about space planning - concerned with head-count and structure and more about place making based on culture.
Comfort, wellbeing and hospitality are closely related. But as the work place is essentially about work, there is still a need to develop an approach that avoids the theatrics employed by some 'cool' corporations, and that a truly balanced approach is developed.

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Days In Sussex held on 9 April 2016 at the Novium in Chichester attracted a capacity audience to hear Paula Day - daughter of Robin and Lucienne Day talk about their work and the work of the Robin and Lucienne Day foundation since their deaths in 2010 and 2011.
Following Paula's presentation in which she selected a piece of work from each parent for each decade, a panel discussion, chaired by Peter Murray with Geradine Hemmingway of Hemmingway Design and Charlie Fowler of John Lewis Partnership explored the Day's legacy and how they worked.
BroomeJenkins were pleased to sponsor the event and congratulate Alys Bryan for making it happen.
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