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Cicely Wilson
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The archived information includes English language summaries of laws, regulations, and related legal instruments that in turn link to the full-text PDFs that are in the official language(s) of the country.

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The head of the powerful Senate Judiciary Committee is urging the federal bureaucracy to restore a decade's worth of electronic court documents that were deleted last month from online viewing because of an upgrade to a computer database known as PACER.

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Check out +Courtney Minick's latest piece on changing text in Supreme Court slip opinions.

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Justia's +Courtney Minick discusses a recent development involving access to court records.

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Great news from Oklahoma on the open access to law front. Electronic appellate opinions published on the Oklahoma State Courts Network are now designated as "official".

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Cornell Law's Peter Martin has a new post up on his blog, Citing Legally:  " . . . increasing delays [in attachment of official volume and page numbers] cast a widening ripple of costs on the federal judiciary, the services that distribute case law, and the many who need to cite it."

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Check out the recently launched Journal of Open Access to Law.

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Cornell law professor Michael Dorf explains why government officials around the country feel compelled to permit Festivus poles as part of their official holiday celebrations. How did we get to this point? The short answer, Dorf explains, is that Festivus poles in state capitols are an unexpected side effect of the Supreme Court’s Establishment Clause jurisprudence.

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Julie Hilden comments on a case that held a posting on a magazine blog containing a false claim - made in in jest and temporary - fit into the First Amendment’s protection for satire.

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Cornell law professor Michael Dorf explains the politics behind filibuster reform, in the wake of the elimination of the rule requiring a supermajority vote to end debate on presidential nominations to the lower federal courts and executive offices. What do you think about filibuster reform?
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