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CC Hogan
25 followers -
Author and Musician
Author and Musician

25 followers
About
CC Hogan's posts

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Come and join me on ReverbNation - become a fan and support me trying to get something going here.

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EM Kaplan Stripped Bare

EM Kaplan strikes up a conversation with Josie Tucker, the hero from her wonderful thrillers.

http://cchogan.com/stripped-bare-em-kaplan/
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CC Hogan commented on a post on Blogger.
I like this.  Reviews, for indie authors especially, are like little adverts, but as such, adverts work best when they are succinct and to the point.  A bad review can often reflect as badly on the reviewer as on the poor author.  One wonders why, if someone hated a book so much, they would really want to go to the time and trouble of tearing it apart? Wouldn't they rather be off reading something better instead?

This is where there is a real difference between an enthusiastic book blogger and a pro reviewer - the pro, normally a journalist, is being payed to review books; it is their job and they HAVE to say something.  The book blogger is doing it for fun - I can see nothing fun about spending one's time complaining.

Although the long review is certainly needed and has its place, I do sometimes worry that it puts off other readers from commenting.  However much I want to see long essays worshipping my writing, I also want to see lots of people saying, "I liked that," or "It made my weekend more enjoyable," or some other simple one liner.  However, getting people to just leave a one line comment is damn hard and I sometimes think they see all these long, heady reviews and say, "I am not going to all that trouble," so write nothing at all.

Who knows.

Anyway, good post, oh nerdy one.  You might like this:

http://cchogan.com/the-importance-of-reviews/

CC

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Be-Elin the Dragon from Dirt - http://aworldcalleddirt.com
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CC Hogan commented on a post on Blogger.
Hi Paul

Another rule about a prologue might be, "Don't write one till you have written everything else and finished it."

A couple of things come out of doing that - firstly you may find that you don't actually need one at all and secondly if you still want one then you can use it to add value to the story, not make up for something you have forgotten. In other words, if you didn't write one it wouldn't really matter, but adding one is just nice for the reader, the pacing and the general intrigue.

Of course, you can be a frustrated old joker like me and want to mess with the reader. In my fantasy series DIrt I use Prologues to introduce an idea or situation which is a setup for the story. They are very short and intentionally leave the reader a few questions which they will eventually see answered.

But I am nothing if not occasionally cruel and Book 1 starts with a very short, intentionally puzzling prologue which, I suspect, most readers will forget they have even read. And that is absolutely fine with me. Because when they get to the very end of the very last book, some 12 or more books later, they are going to go, "Oh!"  And rush off to read the prologue again from Book 1.

Yep, I really do plan that far in advance.

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How do you go about designing a dragon?

If you are creating creatures that are intelligent and have a part to play in your books that is more than just being a nasty surprise with teeth, then you might need to think them out a little more carefully if they are going to be believable.

What would be your checklist of things you need to work out?

http://cchogan.com/designing-dragons/

Cooking Goulash.

Okay, not the most imaginative update, but at least it is honest

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A very short story about dragons

When Be-Eirol met Weasel and Mab-Aneirin

Includes me reading it!

http://cchogan.com/when-be-eirol-first-met-mab-aneirin-and-weasel/
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