Profile cover photo
Profile photo
Cleveland Metroparks
845 followers -
Discover, Enjoy, Protect!
Discover, Enjoy, Protect!

845 followers
About
Posts

Post has attachment
We are working with Zebulon Thomas Films on a brand new video about our trails and "Trails United" fund. 

The project is almost complete! But, until then....check out this awesome teaser:

Post has attachment
WHAT is the world THIS. Nature's BATTLE CLUB? We found this incredibly bizarre and Medieval flail (google "flail") thing attached to a Pin Oak tree. This is the home of a young type of wasp - a strange thing called a Gall. There are a variety of gall-forming species of small wasps that commonly infest oak trees. This one is made by the Horned Oak Gall Wasp, a tiny harmless insect that you would almost never notice because of its size. Galls are abnormal plant growths or swellings made of plant tissue, found on leaves or twigs. These unusual deformities are caused by the plant or tree's chemicals, or stimuli produced by an insect. The chemicals produced by the insect interfere with normal plant cell growth and bulge to create a totally weird rounded globe or growth on a leaf or twig. In this gall lives the young wasp. Most galls are round and smooth. The Horned Oak Gall Wasp makes a gall that looks like the most dangerous 3-inch-sized home you've ever seen. (jb)
Photo

Post has attachment
Goals are sometimes best achieved when you take a moment to step back and evaluate the whole picture; however, today, you don’t have that luxury. See if you can guess what this is a picture of. The answer will be posted later today. (RN)
Photo

Post has attachment
Mallard ducks are strong fliers. Some may fly as fast as 55 mph! Photo credit: Jim Kaftan. (MK)
Photo

Post has attachment
There have been a lot of questions about coyotes recently. Here is program to help answer some of your questions: 

"Curious About Coyotes" 
Sunday, January 13 @ 2:30 - 3:30 p.m.
Garfield Park Nature Center

Garfield Park Reservation now has signs informing hikers that coyotes can be seen within the park! In this short session, you will receive some basic information and have an opportunity to ask questions about coyotes. 

Call 216-341-3152 or visit http://www.clevelandmetroparks.com/Main/EventsProgramsCalendar/Curious-about-Coyotes-445.aspx for more information.
Photo

Post has attachment
Looking for something fun for the kids during winter break? Then sign them up for our "Kids in the Woods" program. 

1/3 (ages 7-8) or 1/4 (ages 9-10) 
9am-3pm
Look About Lodge, South Chagrin Reservation (Bentleyville)

The kids will love exploring the winter woods with a naturalist. Children should fress to be outside for most of the program. Bring a lunch. 

Registration is required. Call 440-247-7075 for more information to register.
Photo

Post has attachment
Photo

Post has attachment
Have you ever wondered about the strange script-like grooves on fallen logs? You are actually viewing the childhood home of bark beetles. By examining their tunnels, you can piece together a bark beetle’s entire life cycle.

Bark beetles usually overwinter beneath the bark of dead or weakened trees. When the weather warms, the female beetle emits pheromones (chemicals that act like an attractive perfume) to catch the attention of a male. Once they mate, the female will excavate tunnels called “egg galleries” where--you guessed it--she will lay her eggs. Look for a big central groove from which other smaller tunnels branch.

The eggs will hatch into larvae called grubs. They resemble small, white, legless worms, and they have one mission: EATING! They eat the nutritional part of the tree beneath the bark. Look for tiny grooves that branch from the egg gallery. Follow these larval tunnels and notice how they get wider as the grub grew. 

The grubs eat until they are ready to undergo metamorphosis (change) into an adult. This pre-adult stage is known as the pupa. This is where the grubs will develop legs, wings, antennae, and all the parts adult beetles have.
Look for small holes in the log. What you see is the exit hole when the adult beetle emerges from beneath the bark. You have just witnessed the evidence of a beetle life cycle! With that messy bark beetle cursive, it’s easy to see why they have earned the nickname “engraver beetles.”
(SV)
Photo

Post has attachment
FAST and Furious! Smaller than a Peregrine Falcon, but ounce for ounce just as powerful, Merlins are rare winter residents of the Cleveland region. Cleveland Metroparks hosts between 4 and 5 (only) wintering Merlins each year. Garfield Park Reservation's wintering Merlins are long-time celebrities, having returned every winter for the past 10+ years (male in photo). They can often be seen during the day, between Garfield Park Reservation and Calvary Cemetery across the street (Broadway Ave), "teed up" high on top of trees searching for small bird prey. While the infamous Peregrine Falcon has broken top record speeds of 200 mph in an aerial dive, Merlins can easily surpass 100 mph. (photo and text by jb).
Photo

Post has attachment
Hey everyone, check out the lastest episode of our Dr. Wildweed video series! What do you know about milkweed?
Wait while more posts are being loaded