Profile

Cover photo
Derek Wise
Works at University of Erlangen
Attended University of California, Riverside
1,187 followers|59,801 views
AboutPostsPhotosVideos

Stream

Derek Wise

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
My tribute to Alexander Grothendieck in The New York Times
To say Alexander Grothendieck was the No. 1 mathematician of the second half of the 20th century cannot begin to do justice to him or his body of work.
7 comments on original post
4
1
Carmen Ledesma's profile photo
Add a comment...

Derek Wise

Shared publicly  - 
 
This leaf is from the garden where I live.  All the green has decayed away, leaving just a network of veins.
32
3
Derek Wise's profile photoSimons Mith's profile photo莊沛慧's profile photoCarmen Ledesma's profile photo
2 comments
 
Thanks! We were lucky to find some of these at just the right stage of decay. After a few more days, they wouldn't have been very photogenic subjects.
Add a comment...

Derek Wise

Shared publicly  - 
 
As a guitarist, I'd have a hard time playing a guitar with no frets, at least when it comes to playing chords.  But playing the theremin must be worse.  Rather like playing a guitar with no neck.  Precise hand placement is crucial, but there's no tactile point of reference.  I'd like to try it sometime.

Here's the original theremin virtuoso Clara Rockmore rocking out on the theremin. 

If you want to know how a theremin works, look here:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Theremin
7
John Baez's profile photoJonas Clark's profile photoDerek Wise's profile photo
5 comments
 
Thanks for the tip, +Jonas Clark.  I've been through Bellingham, on the road between Vancouver and Seattle. If I do that again sometime, I'll try to remember there's an opportunity to play a 1929 theremin along the way.
Add a comment...

Derek Wise

Shared publicly  - 
 
In case anyone is interested in predictions on this year's Nobel Prize in Physics....

Based on an analysis of citations to their work, the media firm Thomson Reuters predicts the prize will go to Francois Englert and Peter Higgs, for theoretical work on the Higgs boson. 

I guess we'll see.
Two physicists who helped shape Higgs theory should expect a call from the Swedish Academy next week, says a media firm famous for its Nobel predictions.
2
Derek Wise's profile photo
 
They were right!
Add a comment...

Derek Wise

Shared publicly  - 
 
I hate to get rid of this cool bookshelf clock that my wife bought me several years ago.  I love it, but it's just never kept very good time!

On the other hand, maybe I've just been keeping it in the wrong section of books?
16
Mohammed S. Al Sahaf's profile photoDerek Wise's profile photoLinas Vepstas's profile photo
4 comments
 
Funny thing is,  time-pieces on sailing ships kept very bad time until it was observed that pocket-watches worked much better.  This lead to a breakthrough in longitude navigation. So its ironic that a pocket-watch-like thing keeps bad time.
Add a comment...

Derek Wise

Shared publicly  - 
 
I love to see researchers so excited about their research field that they are inspired to actually explain it well and help more people understand and appreciate it.  Steve Simon's book might help a lot of students get interested in condensed matter physics:

http://www-thphys.physics.ox.ac.uk/people/SteveSimon/book.html

I haven't seen a print copy yet, but it looks very nice based on the lecture notes it derived from:

http://www-thphys.physics.ox.ac.uk/people/SteveSimon/condmat2012/LectureNotes2012.pdf
4
Rongmin Lu's profile photo
 
From the preface of the notes: "Oxford does not appear to believe in group representations..." Hmm...
Add a comment...
Have them in circles
1,187 people
CharityBasic Needs's profile photo
John Yates's profile photo
Miguel Carrion Alvarez's profile photo
David Hall's profile photo
Aashu Bhardwaj's profile photo
WinkCZ's profile photo
Jery Huntsun's profile photo
nicolas peter's profile photo
Isaac Kuo's profile photo

Derek Wise

Shared publicly  - 
 
Apparently, Richard Feynman has a new blog!  He's explaining vast amounts of basic physics to the masses, in his characteristic style.

(I hadn't realized these were available online until I saw a post on +Pablo Azero's page. Thanks, Pablo!) 
Caltech and The Feynman Lectures Website are pleased to present this online edition of The Feynman Lectures on Physics. Now, anyone with internet access and a web browser can enjoy reading a high quality up-to-date copy of Feynman's legendary lectures. However, we want to be clear that this ...
3
Pablo Azero's profile photoJohn Baez's profile photoDerek Wise's profile photo
3 comments
 
Feynman was always a hip, progressive guy among that crowd, so it's no surprise he's the first to pick up on the posthumous blogging trend.
Add a comment...

Derek Wise

Shared publicly  - 
 
Happy German-American Day!
2
Add a comment...

Derek Wise

Shared publicly  - 
 
SIGMA (Symmetry, Integrability and Geometry: Methods and Applications) is a good math journal, where by "good" I mean "not evil".  It's open access, free to authors, links to the arXiv version, puts the official published version on the arXiv, etc. ... 

It's really very nice. But one has fund so much niceness somehow. Here's a letter I got from them... 

--

Dear SIGMA authors,

We would like to thank you for co-operation with the journal
SIGMA (Symmetry, Integrability and Geometry: Methods and Applications)
http://www.emis.de/journals/SIGMA/
SIGMA is being published for nine years, and its current impact factor is 1.299.

SIGMA does not charge its readers for access, and despite this does
not charge authors for publication (i.e., it is no-fee open-access journal).

Moreover, SIGMA is not supported financially on a regular basis by any entity
(organization, foundation, fund, etc.) in Ukraine or abroad, including
the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, where the Editorial Office works.

Therefore, the journal has no revenue and steady sources of funding
whatsoever, and operates solely on the basis of the good will efforts
of its editors. All editorial work, including, but not limited to, the
copyediting, is done by volunteers free of charge.

SIGMA has no geographical concentration - its authors come
from 75 countries (USA 12.9%, Russia 8.1%, Japan 7.7%, France
6.7%, Italy 5.6%, Germany 4.3%, Spain 4.2%, UK 4,2%, Ukraine 4.0%,
Canada 3.8%, Mexico 3,7%, Australia 2.4%, Belgium 2.4%, Brazil
2,1%, other countries 28,0%), and so it actually belongs to all mathematical
physics community.

In principle, we can see three ways for funding of journal:
1) charging readers (subscription without open access);
2) charging authors to keep open access;
3) finding sponsors.

From the time of founding of the journal in 2005 until now we consistently avoided
resolving to first two options, and we would like to maintain this
position further on. But to do that we would need to find some
external funding.

As a first examples of such funding, we have received one-time
supports from the University Library of the Radboud University
Nijmegen (EUR 3000) and from Sociedad Mexicana de Fisica (USD 3500).
The relevant acknowledgments were published at the bottom of the main
page of the journal. But that covers only a small part of our costs.

If you would like to help in supporting, please contact in this respect
your university, professional societies or funds in your country.
Any amount would be a substantial support to our project.

We hope for your assistance and for any suggestions related to
this matter.

Sincerely yours,

Anatoly Nikitin, the Editor
http://www.emis.de/journals/SIGMA/


#openaccess
8
1
Timothy Gowers's profile photoGarrett Lisi's profile photoDerek Wise's profile photoDavid Roberts's profile photo
5 comments
 
Well, +Garrett Lisi, I did say "good" in the sense of "not evil".  There are also lots of "good" journals (content-wise) that are decidedly evil. 

I do think SIGMA has had some good content, too, but that's a separate issue.
Add a comment...

Derek Wise

Shared publicly  - 
 
When I think of ancient wisdom stored up in trees, I think of tales like the ones told by Lewis and Tolkien.  But here, Japanese astronomers have consulted ancient trees who have told them of some high energy event (perhaps a supernova) that happened more than 1200 years ago.  
Scientists in Japan use ancient trees to look back on the history of our local cosmos, and discover a mystery.
7
1
Carmen Ledesma's profile photo
Add a comment...

Derek Wise

Shared publicly  - 
 
I like +Paul Pichugin's photography, which includes some nice southern star-field pictures.  This isn't the most visually striking of his photos, but it's a cool capture of the whole sky.  It's interactive, so expand and then drag. 
 
A photosphere from earlier this year, the night sky during a meteor shower. 

#photosphere   #nightsky   #milkyway   #stars   #australia  
10 comments on original post
9
1
Kitten KaboodleInc's profile photoBeth Ayer's profile photo
 
This was a fantastic effort from Paul I agree +Derek Wise
Add a comment...

Derek Wise

Shared publicly  - 
 
Math Mode on Google+?

I often see people talking about how nice it would be to have a mode for mathematical notation available on Google+.  Here's a nice discussion about that between +Yonatan Zunger and +Mike Stay, two guys who actually know something about what Google looks like from the inside. 

The discussion is in the comments on this post by +John Baez:

https://plus.google.com/u/0/117663015413546257905/posts/aaguQLUsT5e

so go there if you want more.

(By the way, that actual post is nice too: a famous joke (famous at least among quantum gravity theorists) by Abhay Ashtekar - one with a very elaborate mathematical buildup.  But that's a different story!) 
7
1
Rain Wang's profile photo
Add a comment...
People
Have them in circles
1,187 people
CharityBasic Needs's profile photo
John Yates's profile photo
Miguel Carrion Alvarez's profile photo
David Hall's profile photo
Aashu Bhardwaj's profile photo
WinkCZ's profile photo
Jery Huntsun's profile photo
nicolas peter's profile photo
Isaac Kuo's profile photo
Work
Employment
  • University of Erlangen
    Postdoctoral Fellow, present
  • University of California, Davis
    VIGRE Assistant Professor
Story
Tagline
Mathematical physicist at University of Erlangen
Introduction
I'm a mathematical physicist.  Mathematically speaking, my main interest is in Klein's Erlangen Program and two of its generalizations: Cartan geometry and category theory.  Physically speaking, my main interest is in gravity and spacetime, at both classical and quantum levels.  Personally, I don't make a big distinction between my mathematical and physical interests -- they're deeply tied together in my thinking.
Education
  • University of California, Riverside
    Ph.D. Mathematics, 2002 - 2007