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William Campbell Contemporary Art
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Here is the latest video in our In The Artist's Words Series!  Andrew Marton discusses our current exhibition with artist Cecil Touchon!

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Hear artist Charles Waller discuss his work  in our current exhibition, The Games We Play, with Andrew Marton.

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The Games We Play, an exhibition of works by Tim Liddy, Fred Stonehouse, and Charles Waller, will be on display June 25–August 1, at William Campbell Contemporary Art. An opening reception will be held Thursday, June 25, from 6:00 to 8:00 p.m. The show will feature paintings, painted sculptures, and mixed media pieces by these three nationally established artists, who employ pop culture references, both past and present, to communicate their perceptions of the human condition. Liddy’s contemporized sculptural relics explore the passage and effects of time through the lens of childhood games, while Stonehouse’s real-time, mythical paintings and Waller’s illustrative mixed media pieces utilize facets of the primitive and surreal to examine a beautiful yet imperfect state of mind. 

The Games We Play was curated by gallery assistant Sam Brown, who chose Liddy, Stonehouse, and Waller from a group of artists the gallery watches regularly. “The initial idea for our summer show was to highlight artists that are not part of our regular stable of artists. We wanted to try something a little new and different,” explains Brown. “I was drawn to the playful yet thought-provoking nature of these engaging, whimsical works. Each one grabs the viewer’s attention, inspiring deeper contemplation the longer one looks.”

Tim Liddy’s hyper-realistic painted constructions re-create antique, weathered board game containers, transforming the originally mass-produced objects into unique sculptural works. The pieces play with viewer perception, skewing the line between commodity and fine art. Constructed from copper and detailed with enamel, these contemporary pieces have been painstakingly detailed to appear as relics from the past. Liddy enjoys the concept of such visual deception, and aspires to draw viewers in for further investigation, as well as internal dialogue. “Within the recognizable format of a mid-twentieth-century game box are surprising elements that are often at odds with the traditional object,” reads Liddy’s artist statement. Further, he “inserts wry commentary on mid-century social mores into this comfortably recognizable context. The fact that the boxes seem to be held together tenuously by tape suggests the rapidly eroding conventions of an earlier era.” 

In contrast to Liddy’s familiar, nostalgic imagery, Fred Stonehouse paints colorful, kinetic vignettes that exist in his own, mythic world. Coming from a tradition of storytelling, the artist remains influenced by the tall tales he routinely heard at family gatherings while growing up. “Our history, our myth, fact and fiction, were combined and passed down to us by our elders with the hope, I am certain, that we would add our own chapters and pass it along as well,” he writes. “I believe that a great deal of what I am as an artist is drawn from the way that these stories tinted my glasses and inflected my dreams…” Indeed, Stonehouse’s stylized, surreal narratives take on a larger-than-life quality, even as their messages remain grounded in an often awkward, sometimes playful, reality. “Perfection is boring,” Stonehouse says. By embracing the authenticity he finds in the flawed, Stonehouse seeks to inspire introspection as he unveils the fragility of the human condition.

Sometimes referred to as an “outsider” artist, Charles Waller also works with elements of the primitive to convey his vision of the tenuous, ironic nature of our existence. Inspiration for his subject matter spans across a broad range of found objects, including antique toys, discarded love letters, wedding dresses, and other items he collects while traveling across the United States. Waller’s background as an illustrator emerges in the precisely graphic quality of his two-dimensional pieces, which display a penchant for repetition, pattern, and strong leading lines. The resulting mixed media pieces offer a visually rich juxtaposition of classical techniques with whimsical, at times irreverent, themes to create provocative, visually captivating images. “Sarcasm plays a real big part in my work,” Waller has said. “I think humor is the best way to make a point.”


ABOUT THE ARTISTS

Tim Liddy has shown his work in exhibitions and at art fairs around the country, including venues in New York, Boston, Chicago, Dallas, Miami, San Francisco, Santa Fe, and St. Louis, among others. Internationally, he has exhibited in London, Istanbul, and Taiwan. He is currently represented by galleries in New York, Boston, Chicago, San Francisco, and St. Louis, along with those in Tulsa, Oklahoma; Birmingham, Michigan; and Provincetown, Massachusetts. 

A Michigan native, Liddy now lives and works in St. Louis, where he has served as professor of art at Fontbonne University for the past two decades. He earned his MFA from Washington University in St. Louis, and his BFA from the Center of Creative Studies in Detroit. He also studied at Studio Art Center International in Florence, Italy.


Fred Stonehouse has exhibited his work in one-person and group shows in New York, Los Angeles, Chicago, Austin, Indianapolis, Milwaukee, Nashville, New Orleans, Seattle, and St. Louis, among other U.S. cities. He has shown in Mexico and across Europe as well, in France, Germany, Italy, Scotland, and the Netherlands. His work has been featured in numerous catalog essays and major art publications, including Art in America, Art News, the New York Times, the Los Angeles Times, the Village Voice, the Chicago Sun Times and Chicago Tribune, New Art Examiner, and the St. Louis Post Dispatch, to name a few. 

Public and corporate collections that contain Stonehouse’s work include the Brooks Museum of Art in Memphis, the San Jose Art Museum, the Milwaukee Art Museum, the Madison Art Center, the Tacoma Art Museum, First Bank Minneapolis, and Illinois’ Kemper Insurance, among many others.

Fred Stonehouse received his BFA from the University of Wisconsin in Milwaukee. He has taught and served as associate professor of art at the University of Wisconsin in Madison since 2006.


Charles Waller has exhibited his work in solo and group exhibitions in New York City and throughout New York State, in East Hampton, Syracuse, and Sag Harbor, among other cities. Additionally, he has participated in shows in Canada and Japan. A longtime professional illustrator for several national publications, Waller has won numerous awards for his drawings in the New York Times, Esquire, and Sports Illustrated. His fine art pieces have appeared in various publications, including Moving Art magazine, Hampton Jitney magazine, the East Hampton Star, and the New York Times, among others.

Born in California, Charles Waller grew up in South America and England. He studied English Literature and Psychology at the University of London, and Illustration at the Royal College of Art in London before earning his BFA with honors from the Rhode Island School of Design. Waller currently lives and works in East Hampton, New York.

ABOUT THE GALLERY
Founded in 1974 by William and Pam Campbell, William Campbell Contemporary Art exhibits high-quality contemporary art in a variety of media, including paintings, works on paper, mixed-media constructions, photography, prints, ceramics, and sculpture. By exhibiting nationally recognized artists, along with new and emerging talent, the gallery aims to nurture an awareness and appreciation of the exciting diversity found in contemporary art.

Exhibition curator and gallery assistant Sam Brown has been with William Campbell Contemporary Art for nearly six years. Originally from Atlanta, Ms. Brown attended Boston University, where she received her bachelor’s degree in Art History. She has had broad exposure to contemporary art and gallery operations, and before coming to the Campbell Gallery she held various internships in Boston, Atlanta, and London. In addition to her work at the gallery, she is also a docent at the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth. 

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In The Artist's Words with Bernd Haussmann

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Hear Nicholas Wood discuss his current exhibition at William Campbell Contemporary Art with Andrew Marton. Nicholas Wood's exhibition is on view through May 2 and you do not want to miss these incredible works!

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An exhibition of new paintings by Bernd Haussmann will be on display May 9–June 6 at William Campbell Contemporary Art. A reception for the artist will be held on Saturday, May 9, from 6:00 to 8:00 p.m. The show will feature a collection of new paintings that conceptualize the artist’s curiosities in the abstract, using expressive areas of rich hues, organic shapes, and anchoring lines. The nonrepresentational elements inhabit two dimensions, but also seem to penetrate the picture plane—covering and/or uncovering what lies beneath. With these open-ended non-narratives, Haussmann seeks to evoke contemplation and internal discourse.

Haussmann’s latest paintings present colorful, sometimes playful, shapes and striations that move across the canvas and throughout layers—at times individually, but more often fusing to create a distinct synergy. Although undefined and enigmatic, the pieces recall elements of nature, space, and the life force, on what could be macro or micro levels. Adding to the ambiguous juxtapositions, the cerebral yet visceral compositions are surrounded by hard-edged perimeters that suggest a controlled chaos.

Each of Haussmann’s series informs the next. Even as his new work explores fresh ideas, it nevertheless retains similar theoretical concepts. “My paintings are based on an evolutionary process. Just like in nature, things in my art morph from one form into another,” he says. He continually addresses such questions as how we as humans fit into the world, and how we can gain an understanding of that world. “I have an idea, then I try to find ways to make it visible,” Haussmann says, as he explains that communication is his primary goal when making a painting. He seeks to translate the intellectual into the visual, and the unique language of visual art serves as his vehicle. 

Haussmann strives to develop an ongoing dialogue between art and audience, though he ascribes no particular meaning to any of his work. It is important to him not to color a viewer’s experiences while looking at the paintings, as he firmly believes that “art is about offering, not telling or assuming.” To that end, Haussmann’s work preserves the individuality of each person’s experience, while supporting independent thinking and allowing viewers to find their own truth amid the vivid, swirling universe contained in his work.

ABOUT THE ARTIST
A highly recognized artist, Bernd Haussmann has exhibited work in numerous one-person and group exhibitions across the United States and abroad. Venues include galleries, nonprofit organizations, and art fairs in New York, Boston, Chicago, Miami, New Orleans, San Francisco, Santa Fe, Atlanta, and the Metroplex, among others. Internationally, he has shown work in Germany, Belgium, and Canada.

His work has appeared in many publications, among them Art Ltd., Artnewsinternational, Art New England, the Boston Globe, Fort Worth’s Star-Telegram, New American Paintings, Metropolitan Home, This Old House (25th Anniversary Designer Show House), and House Beautiful. Haussmann’s work can be found in many private and public art collections, including those of the Fort Worth’s Healthpoint Corporation, Alliance Capital and the Ritz Carlton in Boston, the Hyatt Regency and Xerox Corporations in Rochester, Miami Beach’s Fontainebleau, Nordstrom, the Longview Museum of Fine Art, the Danforth Museum of Art in Framingham, and the Stadtmuseum in Tübingen, Germany, to name a few.

Haussmann participates in various creative collaborations as well. He has served as artist-in-residence at the Broad Institute at Harvard and MIT since 2012, and in 2013–2014, he took part in DNA Song, a collaboration with the Berklee School of Music. He also teaches at the Truro Center for the Arts at Castle Hill, and at the Provincetown Art Association and Museum (PAAM), both in Massachusetts.

Born in Tübingen, Germany, Bernd Haussmann became a U.S. resident in 1994. He and his wife Anne split their time between Massachusetts and western Maine.

ABOUT THE GALLERY
Founded in 1974 by William and Pam Campbell, William Campbell Contemporary Art exhibits high-quality contemporary art in a variety of media, including paintings, works on paper, mixed-media constructions, photography, prints, ceramics, and sculpture. By exhibiting nationally recognized artists, along with new and emerging talent, the gallery aims to nurture an awareness and appreciation of the exciting diversity found in contemporary art.

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Nicholas Wood – Recent Works: Drawings/Sculptural Objects will be on display March 28–April 25, at William Campbell Contemporary Art. An opening reception will be held on Spring Gallery Night, Saturday, March 28, from 11:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. The show will feature Wood’s colorful, abstract works on paper interspersed with his expressive, precisely rendered wall sculptures. 

“I have always been intrigued by the dimensional, spatially interactive and material nature of sculptural form, yet also drawn to the frontal, illusionistic pictorial quality which drawings and paintings offer,” says Wood, who likes to show his two- and three-dimensional pieces in the same space. They play off each other visually, while also offering a glimpse into the artist’s process. Wood’s charcoal and pastel drawings began as visualizations of emerging sculptures, but over time have evolved into their own thoughtful and visually complex body of work. And as they are paired with the three-dimensional pieces, viewers can see how the two media diverge and coalesce, informing and re-informing one another.

Wood’s sculptural objects consist of painted wood and ceramic pieces mounted on the wall. These hybrid works—encapsulating both two and three dimensions—penetrate the surrounding space while also retaining what the artist calls “vertical frontality.” They incorporate shadow as well, which becomes integral to each display, affording additional shape and dimension. The pieces evoke a refined tactility, as layers of pigment are applied, sanded, reapplied, and smoothed. All these factors merge to further activate visual and intellectual conversation between art and viewer.

Wood’s abstract drawings and wall sculptures exhibit an austere energy, as cleanly delineated, flowing shapes and forms hover atop their surfaces. The imagery often references recognizable objects, though from an altered and tangential artist’s perspective. They become universal in that vein, allowing viewers to connect on a variety of personal and aesthetic levels. Wood remarks, “While the initial choices of imagery and composition are conceptually established, all the works are open enough to pose a variety of interpretations. This variety presents multiple layers and possible readings and for me, floats in a state that like abstraction itself, esteems ambiguity and discovery.”

ABOUT THE ARTIST
A highly reputed, active artist across the Metroplex and beyond, Nicholas Wood has honed his skills over nearly four decades. He has exhibited his drawings and sculptural objects in dozens of one-person and group shows in venues throughout Texas, in Fort Worth, Dallas, Arlington, Austin, Houston, and San Antonio, among other cities. Nationally, he has participated in shows from coast to coast, in California, Colorado, Connecticut, Indiana, Maryland, New York State, and North Carolina, to name a few. He has shown in Paris and Bad Könisgshofen and Trier, Germany, as well. Public art projects include collaborating on The Bridge II, a steel sculpture next to the Arlington Museum of Art, and The Bridge I, a correlating sculpture in Arlington’s sister city Bad Königshofen, Germany. As a curator, Wood has organized shows at the Arlington Museum of Art, The Gallery at UTA, the Fort Worth International Center, and Dallas’ 500X Gallery. 

Wood’s artwork has appeared in many publications, including ARTnews, Arts + Culture magazine, American Ceramics, the Arlington Morning News, Ceramics Monthly, D magazine, the Dallas Morning News, Fort Worth Weekly, the New York Times, Star-Telegram, and the Texas Art Revue. He has been featured in numerous books as well, among them Art Tiles (Lark Studio Series, Sterling Publishing), Architectural Ceramics (Lark Book Publishing), and A Century of Sculpture in Texas 1889–1989 (University of Texas Press). 

Many private and corporate art collections feature Wood’s work, including the City of San Francisco Arts’ Commission, London’s Dorchester Hotel, the Hill Gillstrap Law Firm, the New York State College of Ceramics, Pacific Enterprise Oil Company, Dallas
Southeast Banking Corporation, Southwestern Bell Telephone, Texas Instruments, US Trust Company of Texas, and UT Southwestern Medical Center.

Nicholas Wood earned his MFA from New York State College at Alfred University, and his BFA from San Francisco State University. He currently serves as a professor of art and art history at the University of Texas at Arlington.
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