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Some animals can regrow whole limbs or organs after amputation. 

In their paper Adler et al. develop a new technique for studying regeneration in planaria (a type of flatworm that can regenerate their whole body from small pieces).

http://elifesciences.org/content/3/e02238
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Doroquez et al. at Brandeis University use 3-D imaging and electron microscopy to generate highly detailed 3-D reconstructions of cilia in the nose of C. elegans.

http://elife.elifesciences.org/content/3/e01948
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Using a new type of electron detector to show the structure of the Frh hydrogenase in greater detail than ever before. Allegretti et al.

http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01963
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eLife Sciences

Hangouts On Air  - 
 
Today! Please join us at 2pm Eastern
 
On February 13, 2014, at 2PM Eastern time/7PM GMT, join eLife for an online panel discussion on how scientists can change science publishing and research assessment.

In December, eLife Editor-in-chief +Randy Schekman called for an end to the scientific community’s dependence on high-profile journals and their impact factors as a measure of the quality of research. His comments were published in The Guardian on the day he accepted the 2013 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine. Dr. Schekman’s challenge has inspired wide conversation and debate and was followed up by a second editorial, in The Conversation, where he offered specific actions that scientists could take to improve research assessment.

On February 13, eLife will host a panel discussion to explore in more depth the implications of Dr. Schekman’s proposals for today’s scientists and what the future of science publishing really could be, if freed from existing constraints. He will be joined by:

+Jack Andraka, 17 year-old inventor, scientist, and cancer researcher, whose research on the open Web inspired his design of a new cancer detection method.
+Jody Culham, Professor of Psychology at Western University in Canada and eLife reviewing editor for neuroscience.
To participate, please join us +eLife on Google+. A Google+ account is not required; the broadcast will be free and open.

The eLife Hangout On Air on science publishing and research assessment
Thursday, February 13, 2014
2PM Eastern | 7PM GMT

Add eLife to your circles on Google Plus

#hangoutonair #luxuryjournals #openaccess #oa #stem #peerreview
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We're changing the way work is reviewed and vetted for publication.
Articles will be judged by a group of academic editors who are active and respected researchers, who have expertise across the relevant disciplines, and who are committed to assessing submissions efficiently and fairly on the basis of their scientific merits. Our approach to the editorial process focuses on delivering the highest level of service to authors, and saving time at every step. Here's how it will work:
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eLife Sciences

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In numbers we trust? 

Eve Marder on why we should focus on the science in research papers, not the number of times the paper has been cited or viewed.

http://elife.elifesciences.org/content/3/e02791
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Baker et al. use MEG scanners to measure changes in the magnetic fields generated by electrical currents in the brain, detecting alterations in brain activity much more rapidly than fMRI.

The team from the University of Oxford suggest that the resting brain is constantly changing between different patterns of activity, which enables it to respond quickly to any given situation.

http://elife.elifesciences.org/content/3/e01867
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Hangout On Air starting soon! Don't go away
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This Hangout On Air is hosted by eLife Sciences. The live video broadcast will begin soon.
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A column in the Guardian on the 10th of May made a really good point on this: scientists are not ready to quit the luxury journals cause grants are still based on them. Funding bodies, such as the Wellcome Trust or CRUK (in the UK) have the power to change things. Horizon 2020 (a european project) points this out and says they won't base their choice on impact factor. true? I don't know, but I think this is the way to go. thoughts?
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Publishing is just the beginning.
Introduction
The new funder-researcher collaboration and journal for the best research in life science and biomedicine.

Description
eLife is a unique collaboration between funders and practitioners of research to communicate influential discoveries in the life and biomedical sciences in the most effective way. 

We are a joint initiative of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, the Max Planck Society, and the Wellcome Trust. Along with a growing number of public and private research funders worldwide, these three organisations recognise that the communication of research results is as fundamental a component of the research process as are the experiments themselves. Disseminating new findings as widely and effectively as possible maximises the value of research investments. The first step in the initiative is to establish a new, top-tier open-access journal covering basic biological research through to applied, translational and clinical studies. 

The eLife journal is a platform for extending the reach and influence of new discoveries and to showcase new approaches to the presentation, use, and assessment of research. 

eLife is not just a journal. That’s just the beginning.