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eLife Sciences

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Today we celebrate the publication of 1000 scientific discoveries and the appointment of a new Deputy Editor, neuroscientist Eve Marder at Brandeis University.

To celebrate, we've filled our office with 1000 balloons - one for each piece of research we've published.

Follow along with our balloon-filled day as on Twitter using ‪#‎eLife1000‬

http://elifesciences.org/elife-news/eLife-Welcomes-New-Deputy-Editor
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Scientists have uncovered the earliest fossilised evidence of an insect caring for its young.

 http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05447
 
The findings push back the earliest direct evidence of insect brood care by more than 50 million years, to at least 100 million years ago when dinosaurs dominated the earth.
 
The new fossil is the only record of an adult female insect from the Mesozoic, an era that spanned roughly 180 million years. The Mesozoic era was the age of the reptiles and saw both the rise and fall of the dinosaurs, as well as the breakup of the supercontinent Pangaea.
 
The female ensign scale insect is preserved in a piece of amber retrieved from a mine in northern Myanmar (Burma). The specimen was trapped while carrying around 60 eggs and her first freshly hatched nymphs. 
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Charlop-Powers et al. at The Rockefeller University analyse soil from beaches, forests, and deserts on five continents in order to discover the best places in the world to mine untapped antibiotic and anticancer drugs. 

http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05048

The scientists now want to collect more samples from unique environments such as caves, hot springs, islands and city parks. They will continue with their citizen science effort, Drugs from Dirt, inviting the public to submit samples.
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How can we explain consciousness?

http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04499

Akeju, Loggia et al. explore how consciousness arises from activity in the brain. The they use brain imaging to examine the changes that occur as healthy volunteers enter and emerge from a light form of anesthesia.
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eLife is sharing short non-technical summaries of published articles on the blog-publishing platform medium.com.

Visit eLife on Medium, and follow us to be updated when we share more Digests in the future.

http://elifesciences.org/eLife-news/eLife-is-now-on-Medium

eLife Digests are written to clearly explain the main findings of each article, and to provide the background that is needed to put these findings into context. eLife writers and editors work with the authors of the Research Article to ensure that the Digests are both accurate and understandable by a broad audience.
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Four more early-career authors have been invited to participate in a meeting hosted by one of our founders.

Authors Andrea Brautigam (Heinrich-Heine-Universität, Germany), Kirsty Wan (University of Cambridge, UK), Mehabaw Derebe (UT Southwestern Medical Center, US), and Andrew Seeds (Janelia Farm Research Campus, US), will be sponsored to present their work at their choice of upcoming meeting.
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Less than 4 hours to go until our next life Hangout on Air.
 
Please join us December 8th (4pm GMT) to hear from the authors of three promising studies on the link between gut bacteria and arthritis, the structure of a receptor playing a key role in development and a diagnostic tool capable of distinguishing between different types of enteric fever. These studies were published in eLife and selected by eLife’s editors for “eLife-sponsored presentations” at a scientific meeting of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Max Planck Society, or the Wellcome Trust. The presentations feature the pre-tenure author and are a great opportunity for early-career scientists to participate in prestigious scientific gatherings in their fields.
 
Our guests will discuss their work online in a Google Hangout On-Air and include: 
 
Stephen Baker, Wellcome Trust Major Overseas Programme, Oxford University Clinical Research Unit (UK), “Fitness benefits in fluoroquinolone-resistant Salmonella Typhi in the absence of antimicrobial pressure” 

Rajat Rohatgi, Division of Oncology, Stanford School of Medicine (USA), “Structure and function of the Smoothened extracellular domain in vertebrate Hedgehog signaling”

Curtis Huttenhower, Department of Biostatistics, Harvard School of Public Health, “Expansion of intestinal Prevotella copri correlates with enhanced susceptibility to arthritis”

The event will be moderated by Chris Smith, producer of the eLife podcast and host of the Naked Scientists – an award-winning team of broadcasters whose aim is to promote science to the general public. The authors and papers selected for the next set of eLife-sponsored presentations will also be announced.
 
eLife-sponsored presentations showcase the early-career authors of studies selected by eLife’s editors to represent the breadth, quality, and importance of papers invited by the journal. Up to four papers are identified twice each year. The sponsorships are one of many eLife initiatives to highlight the scientific contributions of pre-tenure scientists – including the eLife podcast and letters of recommendation from our senior editors. 
 
Join us to learn more about these advances, the authors behind the work, and how eLife is making the publishing experience pain-free for all scientists. 
This Hangout On Air is hosted by eLife Sciences. The live video broadcast will begin soon.
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eLife #HOA showcasing outstanding papers by early career authors
Mon, December 8, 2014, 11:00 AM
Hangouts On Air - Broadcast for free

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eLife Sciences

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Recognising the importance of new tools and resources for research.

eLife is introducing a new article type —called Tools and Resources— to highlight new experimental techniques, datasets, software tools and other resources.

http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07083
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Striking images from Lindström et al. reveal new insights into how the kidney develops from a group of cells into a complex organ.

http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04000

The team use time-lapse imaging to capture mouse kidneys growing in the laboratory on camera. They identify a key molecule called beta-catenin that instructs cells to form specialised structures within the kidney.
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Makin et al. further explore the links between changes in the behaviour of individuals missing a hand and changes in their brains.

http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04605

In their latest work the team report alterations in structural and functional brain symmetry of the sensorimotor network in a large sample of individuals born without a hand compared to controls.
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Liu et al. at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute take advantage of advanced microscopes to observe the interaction between Sox2 and its binding site in the nucleus of living embryonic cells. 

http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04236

This three-dimensional imaging technology is powerful enough to capture images of individual molecules. By making a series of time-lapse movies, it was revealed that instead of being evenly scattered in the nucleus, Sox2's binding sites are grouped together to form individual clusters.
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eLife has published the first papers from the Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology. 

First announced in October 2013 with $1.3 million in funding from the Laura and John Arnold Foundation, The Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology (RP:CB) aims to replicate key experimental findings in 50 high-profile cancer biology papers published between 2010 and 2012. The project is a partnership between the Center for Open Science, Science Exchange, and eLife.

Read more about the project at: 
http://elifesciences.org/elife-news/Cancer-biology-reproducibility-effort-takes-another-step-forward
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An artist theory on the physics of 'Time' as a physical process. Quantum Atom Theory's profile photo
Aurimas Gumbrys's profile photo
Alegado Lab's profile photo
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Benjamin Maniyar's profile photo
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Publishing is just the beginning.
Introduction
The new funder-researcher collaboration and journal for the best research in life science and biomedicine.

Description
eLife is a unique collaboration between funders and practitioners of research to communicate influential discoveries in the life and biomedical sciences in the most effective way. 

We are a joint initiative of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, the Max Planck Society, and the Wellcome Trust. Along with a growing number of public and private research funders worldwide, these three organisations recognise that the communication of research results is as fundamental a component of the research process as are the experiments themselves. Disseminating new findings as widely and effectively as possible maximises the value of research investments. The first step in the initiative is to establish a new, top-tier open-access journal covering basic biological research through to applied, translational and clinical studies. 

The eLife journal is a platform for extending the reach and influence of new discoveries and to showcase new approaches to the presentation, use, and assessment of research. 

eLife is not just a journal. That’s just the beginning.