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eLife
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Publishing is just the beginning.
Publishing is just the beginning.

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Today we celebrate the publication of 1000 scientific discoveries and the appointment of a new Deputy Editor, neuroscientist Eve Marder at Brandeis University.

To celebrate, we've filled our office with 1000 balloons - one for each piece of research we've published.

Follow along with our balloon-filled day as on Twitter using ‪#‎eLife1000‬

http://elifesciences.org/elife-news/eLife-Welcomes-New-Deputy-Editor
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Recognising the importance of new tools and resources for research.

eLife is introducing a new article type —called Tools and Resources— to highlight new experimental techniques, datasets, software tools and other resources.

http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07083
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Scientists have uncovered the earliest fossilised evidence of an insect caring for its young.

 http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05447
 
The findings push back the earliest direct evidence of insect brood care by more than 50 million years, to at least 100 million years ago when dinosaurs dominated the earth.
 
The new fossil is the only record of an adult female insect from the Mesozoic, an era that spanned roughly 180 million years. The Mesozoic era was the age of the reptiles and saw both the rise and fall of the dinosaurs, as well as the breakup of the supercontinent Pangaea.
 
The female ensign scale insect is preserved in a piece of amber retrieved from a mine in northern Myanmar (Burma). The specimen was trapped while carrying around 60 eggs and her first freshly hatched nymphs. 
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Striking images from Lindström et al. reveal new insights into how the kidney develops from a group of cells into a complex organ.

http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04000

The team use time-lapse imaging to capture mouse kidneys growing in the laboratory on camera. They identify a key molecule called beta-catenin that instructs cells to form specialised structures within the kidney.
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Charlop-Powers et al. at The Rockefeller University analyse soil from beaches, forests, and deserts on five continents in order to discover the best places in the world to mine untapped antibiotic and anticancer drugs. 

http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05048

The scientists now want to collect more samples from unique environments such as caves, hot springs, islands and city parks. They will continue with their citizen science effort, Drugs from Dirt, inviting the public to submit samples.
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Makin et al. further explore the links between changes in the behaviour of individuals missing a hand and changes in their brains.

http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04605

In their latest work the team report alterations in structural and functional brain symmetry of the sensorimotor network in a large sample of individuals born without a hand compared to controls.
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How can we explain consciousness?

http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04499

Akeju, Loggia et al. explore how consciousness arises from activity in the brain. The they use brain imaging to examine the changes that occur as healthy volunteers enter and emerge from a light form of anesthesia.
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Liu et al. at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute take advantage of advanced microscopes to observe the interaction between Sox2 and its binding site in the nucleus of living embryonic cells. 

http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04236

This three-dimensional imaging technology is powerful enough to capture images of individual molecules. By making a series of time-lapse movies, it was revealed that instead of being evenly scattered in the nucleus, Sox2's binding sites are grouped together to form individual clusters.
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eLife is sharing short non-technical summaries of published articles on the blog-publishing platform medium.com.

Visit eLife on Medium, and follow us to be updated when we share more Digests in the future.

http://elifesciences.org/eLife-news/eLife-is-now-on-Medium

eLife Digests are written to clearly explain the main findings of each article, and to provide the background that is needed to put these findings into context. eLife writers and editors work with the authors of the Research Article to ensure that the Digests are both accurate and understandable by a broad audience.
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Four more early-career authors have been invited to participate in a meeting hosted by one of our founders.

Authors Andrea Brautigam (Heinrich-Heine-Universität, Germany), Kirsty Wan (University of Cambridge, UK), Mehabaw Derebe (UT Southwestern Medical Center, US), and Andrew Seeds (Janelia Farm Research Campus, US), will be sponsored to present their work at their choice of upcoming meeting.
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