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World Wide Permaculture
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A three sisters garden is a way to grow a nutritionally complete meal the way nature intended. It’s a classic component in permaculture homesteads. In fact, it’s been a classic for over seven hundred years.

The three sisters garden was one of the main food production sources for the Iroquois and many other tribes across North America.
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With a certified organic industry worth close to $2 billion, demand for Australian organic products is continuing to outweigh supply – at home and abroad. However, greenwashing from companies claiming to be ecofriendly means that many consumers aren’t getting the organic products they’re expecting.

In Australia, companies aren’t required to be certified before labeling products as “organic” – leaving the door open for corporations to include words like “sustainable,” “natural,” “free-range,” and “organic” on their packaging to entice buyers.
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A banana circle is a classic permaculture technique. That’s because it’s a perfect partnership between edible plants and waste. It’s a way for you to compost food scraps and wastewater like you would in a regular compost pile while simultaneously creating an ideal growing environment for bananas and other plants.

To plant a banana circle in your garden, simply dig a circular pit, about two meters wide and one meter deep. Take the soil you’ve removed and mound it around the pit. This is where you will plant your bananas, and the pit is where you’ll create a new compost pile.
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The practice of chop and drop mulching has long been a core technique utilized by permaculturists around the world, but there is more to this concept than meets the eye. Before you begin incorporating this practice into your own permaculture design, there are some factors you need to consider.

In theory, chop and drop mulching is pretty straightforward – you find a tree or a plant that can be used as mulch; prune off branches, leaves, or the entire plant; drop these branches, leaves, or plants to the ground; and you leave it there. However, depending on the type of plant you’re pruning and the climate you live in, this practice may not be 100 per cent effective.
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For homesteaders and permaculturists who are growing increasingly concerned about the current level of global instability, it might be time to think about preparing for a potential move to off-grid living. Luckily, if you already have experience in the practice of permaculture and homesteading, you’re well on your way to preparedness – you just need to scale up your efforts a bit and know what to focus on.
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Permaculture’s core is rooted in the philosophy’s adherence to three equal ethics. The first two, Earth Care and People Care, have been widely accepted by the community for what they are – straight-forward and logical. The third ethic, however, has been the subject of some debate among permaculture practitioners for many years.
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On the outer fringes of your landscape, there may be areas of wilderness. How are we to tend to these wild patches in a way that fosters increase in edibles in zones 4 and 5? And how do we maximize our food production in our first three zones? Using our permaculture principles, we can increase the bounty of wild plants already on the land and introduce native species to the mix.
Simple measures, such as sowing seeds or transplanting the plants themselves, are easy to do. Burning, pruning and coppicing wild plants can help to achieve greater food productivity, edibility, and diversity.
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The Five Zones of Permaculture:

The best way to break down a permaculture ecosystem is into zones. Zones are a great way of boiling down the elements of our design based upon the frequency of human use and plant or animal needs. Elements which are attended to frequently are located closer to the dwelling and those that need limited contact or thrive in isolation are located further away. The zones are numbered from zero to five:
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A Permaculture ecosystem has zones. Those areas attended to frequently are close to our house and those thrive in isolation are located further away.
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Treat permaculture as a worthwhile pursuit that requires compensation for your efforts. There is no value attached to something that is free.
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