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Aram Dulyan
1,643 followers -
I write code.
I write code.

1,643 followers
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Aram's posts

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As is tradition, any photo that gets picked for the auto-awesome treatment by Photo Assistant also gets shared. And it's a pretty good one this time.
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Auto-awesome is at it again, this time reminding me why my shoulders are so sore.
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Auto-awesome is doing things I like again.
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A stroll down memory lane of playing early Ingress versions. See the image captions for more details.

#oldschool  
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2015-08-05
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Type of appeal: Rejected new submission
Portal title: Mawson's Hut
Location: -36.222003, 148.403346

Reason: Adventurous tourist attraction

This hut is one of many in the Snowy Mountains region maintained by the Kosciuszko Huts Association. Huts like this one provide shelter to bushwalkers and cross-country skiers in the area. The doors are unlocked, and visitors are welcome to stay overnight and use the fireplace, as long as they share the space with others and replace any firewood used.

It was built in 1930, and has been incorrectly associated with Sir Douglas Mawson and the training of his Antarctic dog teams. In reality, it's named after its builder, Herb Mawson, the manager of the Bobundra cattle station. It has since been maintained by the Exclusive Squirrels and later the New Squirrels ski club, and hosts a small library of books.

What this hut lacks in history it more than makes up by its location. Situated halfway between Mt Gungartan and Mt Jagungal (the 18th and 20th highest points on the continent), it's an important checkpoint and point of refuge for walkers undertaking the Australian Alps Walking Track. Unlike many of the other huts, there are no marked trails to or from the hut, access is entirely off-trail, and there are no trails or notable landmarks for kilometres in any direction, which makes the hut more popular with cross-country skiers than walkers.

More info can be found on the hut's listing in the Kosciuszko Huts Association register:
http://khuts.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=181:mawsons-hut&catid=83&Itemid=188

Though there is no Street View in the area, the hut is clearly visible on the satellite view at the provided location, as shown in the attached photo. Being located on the public lands of the Kosciuszko National Park, there are no restrictions for public access.
124 votes
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votes visible to Public
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78%
Review this appeal! [Yes]
78%
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22%
Not a valid/complete appeal. [No]
22%

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Type of appeal: Rejected new submission
Portal title: Oldfield's Hut
Location: -35.677482, 148.754993

Reason: Historical significance; Adventurous tourist attraction

This hut is one of many in the Snowy Mountains region maintained by the Kosciuszko Huts Association. Huts like this one provide shelter to bushwalkers and cross-country skiers in the area. The doors are unlocked, and visitors are welcome to stay overnight and use the fireplace, as long as they share the space with others and replace any firewood used.

Oldfield's Hut is an important checkpoint on the Australian Alps Walking Track, providing a convenient stopover between the Cotter Valley (where camping is prohibited) and Cooleman Caves. Many adventure seekers have met like-minded people while here, and the guestbook is full of their stories.

The hut was built in 1925 for the Oldfield family, who ran cattle-grazing operations in the area. Unlike many of the other huts, it was not damaged by bushfires, and has not been extensively refurbished, with the construction remaining much as it was built.

The Kosciuszko Huts Association describes it as having "exceptional value from both a heritage and recreational viewpoint". More info can be found here:
http://www.khuts.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=376:oldfields-hut&catid=64&Itemid=107

Though there is no Street View in the area, the hut is clearly visible on the satellite view at the provided location, as shown in the attached photo. Being located on the public lands of the Kosciuszko National Park, there are no restrictions for public access.
129 votes
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votes visible to Public
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74%
Review this appeal! [Yes]
74%
Poll option image
26%
Not a valid/complete appeal. [No]
26%

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Selfie, as requested. May have burnt out my fingers, cooldown active. First Gold Translator in Australia (18:50 AEDT 01'FEB), as far as I'm aware. Put me down for an ADA, +Joe Philley.

#Glyphs 
#showmeyourglyphbadge
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*What colour is this banknote?*

It's really bothering me that this is even up for debate, but people I've asked have been split 50/50 on what colour best describes the Australian $20 note. Time to make things more "scientific".
99 votes
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votes visible to Public
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61%
Red
61%
39%
Orange
39%

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Sorry for bragging...
Ding! First L16 agent in Australia.

Everyone has their own reasons why they Ingress. Mine are twofold: the people and the travel. And since there is no badge for having fun with your teammates (I would definitely have black if there was), I knew I'd have to go for the "travel badges".

I've long been called a "tourist in my own backyard" by my friends, so I thought I'd live up to that moniker by chasing unique portal visits and captures without leaving Australia. One and a half years of playing later, having visited every major city here except Perth, I've finally claimed the titles of Platinum Explorer and Pioneer.

I'm no +Damien Mórka, so to meet the other major L16 requirement, I had to resort to a black Guardian. However, I don't subscribe to the theory that a Guardian is a "lucky" badge (though it can be). It's a badge that can be gained through sheer physical effort, endurance, geographical knowledge, persistence, and, of course, travel. A good Guardian is one your opponents know about, but are helpless to do anything about. That's how I got mine, and I've been helping my teammates get theirs in a similar way ever since.

Huge kudos to my honourable opponent +Alistair Erskine, who beat me to all L16 requirements except the black Guardian by a week. And huge thanks to everyone who supported me in all my crazy travel pursuits, and everyone whose fingers were too slow on the "deploy" button when I was around.
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2014-08-27
6 Photos - View album

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Ding! First L16 agent in Australia.

Everyone has their own reasons why they Ingress. Mine are twofold: the people and the travel. And since there is no badge for having fun with your teammates (I would definitely have black if there was), I knew I'd have to go for the "travel badges".

I've long been called a "tourist in my own backyard" by my friends, so I thought I'd live up to that moniker by chasing unique portal visits and captures without leaving Australia. One and a half years of playing later, having visited every major city here except Perth, I've finally claimed the titles of Platinum Explorer and Pioneer.

I'm no +Damien Mórka, so to meet the other major L16 requirement, I had to resort to a black Guardian. However, I don't subscribe to the theory that a Guardian is a "lucky" badge (though it can be). It's a badge that can be gained through sheer physical effort, endurance, geographical knowledge, persistence, and, of course, travel. A good Guardian is one your opponents know about, but are helpless to do anything about. That's how I got mine, and I've been helping my teammates get theirs in a similar way ever since.

Huge kudos to my honourable opponent +Alistair Erskine, who beat me to all L16 requirements except the black Guardian by a week. And huge thanks to everyone who supported me in all my crazy travel pursuits, and everyone whose fingers were too slow on the "deploy" button when I was around.
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2014-08-27
6 Photos - View album
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