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Commission for Dark Skies
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Dark skies! The orange glow is from the rising Moon.
 
Almost Moonrise
Adam: "The Milky Way rises over the rugged coast of Maine with the moonrise not far behind it. The orange glow on the horizon is from the approaching moon."

Credit: Adam Woodworth
Adam's website: www.AdamWoodworth.com
Release Date: April 29, 2016

+Adam Woodworth 
+Commission for Dark Skies 
+International Dark-Sky Association 

#Astronomy #Space #Science #Earth #MilkyWay #Galaxy #Stars #Moon #Moonrise #Maine #Atlantic #Ocean #USA #UnitedStates #Photography #Astrophotography #Art #STEM #Education
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"Following the Island Roads PFI roll-out of over 12,000 new LED street lights, the Isle of Wight Green Party has produced a free two-page PDF briefing for communities on the mainland and beyond. This document advises councillors and community activists to scrutinise proposed street lighting replacements with care."
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The photographer comments that due to the bright lights, stars are only clearly visible in part of the sky above the beach.
 
Awaiting the Milky Way in Hong Kong
Lee: "Wandering around on the beach looking for some composition while waiting for the Milky Way rising in a few hours. The lights from behind was quite intense making only the two far side of the beach can be taken with some stars in the sky! Happy to found these curvy stream and rocks on this other end of Shek O beach!"

Shek O is a beachside village located on the southeastern part of Hong Kong Island in Hong Kong. Administratively, it is part of Southern District. The scenery of Shek O is the setting of numerous Cantopop music videos. (Source: Wikipedia)

Credit: Bun Lee
Bun's website: www.bunleephotography.com
Location: Shek O Beach, Hong Kong, China
Release Date: February 7, 2016

+Bun Lee 
+Commission for Dark Skies 

#Astronomy #Space #Science #Stars #Astrophotography #Art #Earth #ShekO #Beach #HongKong #香港 #China #中国 #LightPollution
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"For billions of years, plant and animal life has used the predictable rhythm of night and day to survive. Over the last several decades, humankind has become far more sensitive to the consequences of some pollution, but hasn’t paid much attention to the consequences of another harmful pollutant: light."
Light pollution distorts the night sky and threatens life on Earth
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Bodmin Moor's "exceptional" conditions and lack of light pollution could help it become an international dark sky park.
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Only, if you go there to stargaze remember to look out for 'the Beast of Bodmin Moor'.
(I remember that story hogging the news 15-20 years ago.😨) 😄
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"The Broads Authority is considering applying for Dark Sky Status from the International Dark Skies Association"
The nighttime skies over the Broads could be awarded special protection if an authority decides to bid for the status.
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Scorpius Rising Behind Trees in Australia
Alan: "Scorpius rising just after moonset in a darkened sky, as it comes up on its side from Australia’s southern latitude. Mars is the bright object to the left of Antares, with Saturn below the Mars-Antares pairing. The direction toward the center of the Milky Way is just rising above the treetops."
 
Credit: Alan Dyer
Date: April 13, 2016

Technical details: "This is a stack of 2 x 90-second exposures, tracked, for the sky plus another similar exposure through the Kenko Softon A filter for the fuzzy stars, plus two untracked exposures for the sharper ground, albeit silhouetted trees. The tree edges are blurred slightly where the tracked and untracked exposures meet."

+Alan Dyer 
+Commission for Dark Skies 

#Astronomy #Space #Science #Earth #Australia #Stars
#Sirius #Moonset #Mars #Antares #MilkyWay #Galaxy
#Astrophotography #Art #Cosmos #Universe #STEM #Education 
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<span>The firelight yellow of sodium-vapor streetlights is giving way to the clinical pallor of light-emitting diodes.</span>
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It's true - LEDs can be different colours and brightness.
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"The globally increasing light pollution has negative effects on organisms and entire ecosystems. The consequences are especially hard on nocturnal insects, since their attraction to artificial light sources generally ends fatal. A new study now shows that urban moths have learned to avoid light."
The globally increasing light pollution has negative effects on organisms and entire ecosystems. The consequences are especially hard on nocturnal insects, since their attraction to artificial light sources generally ends fatal. A new study now shows that urban moths have learned to avoid light.
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Photographs of the floodlights being tested at Gloucestershire County Cricket Ground in Bristol.
SIX towering 147ft floodlights have been switched on at Bristol's Gloucestershire County Cricket ground for the first time. The £1.1million lights were illuminated for the first time last...
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Aurora over Kvaløya Island, Tromsø, Norway: View 2
Anne: "Maybe this year's last auroras over Tromsø? The aurora forecast held its promise. A bright green cut through the sky from east to west just before midnight."

Credit: Anne Birgitte Fyhn
Location: Kvaløya island, Tromsø, Norway
Date: April 5, 2016

+Commission for Dark Skies 

#Astronomy #Space #Science #Aurora #Borealis #NorthernLights #Stars #Astrophotography #Art #Science #STEM #Education #Earth #Norway #Norge #Tromsø #Andøya #Island #Europe #Panorama 
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Have them in circles
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Tagline
Restore our natural, starry skies by reducing inefficient lighting.
Introduction
The Commission for Dark Skies (CfDS) aims to preserve and restore the beauty of the night sky by campaigning against excessive, inefficient and irresponsible lighting that shines where it is not wanted nor needed.

It was founded in 1989 and is part of the British Astronomical Association (BAA) and affiliated with the International Dark-Sky Association (IDA).

The issues raised by light pollution do not only affect astronomers.  Other areas of concern include crime, the environment and health.

Glare and light spill can make it more difficult to see in the dark. Nocturnal wildlife, such as bats and moths, and plants, eg which use day length to monitor seasons, can be affected. So can migrating birds. Intrusive light can, for example, disrupt sleep.

Some of the pages on the Campaign for Dark Skies website:
Publications about light pollution:

Books:

Light Pollution: Responses and Remedies, 2nd Edition, Bob Mizon, Springer, was published on 24 June 2012. The first version of the book is still available: Light Pollution: Responses and RemediesBob Mizon, Springer, 2002. On amazon.co.uk 'Look Inside!' is enabled for both books. The previews include contents and index.


There Once Was a Sky Full of Stars, Bob Crelin and Amie Ziner, Sky Publishing Corporation, 2007.

Reports:

Light Pollution and Astronomy, House of Commons Science and Technology Committee, 2003 [pdf]

Artificial Light in the Environment, The Royal Commission on Environmental Pollution, 2009. [pdf]


Guidance for the Reduction of Obtrusive Light, ILP, 2012. [pdf, automatic download]

A Review of the Impact of Artificial Light on Invertebrates, Charlotte Bruce-White and Matt Shardlow, Buglife, 2011. [pdf]

DVD:

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