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Commission for Dark Skies
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A study shows trees start budding up to a week early in the most brightly lit areas of the United Kingdom.
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Galaxy and Planets Beyond Bristlecone Pines
What's older than these ancient trees? Nobody you know—but almost everything in the background of this picture. The trees are impressively old—each part of the Ancient Bristlecone Pine Forest located in eastern California, USA. There, many of the oldest trees known are located, some dating as far back as about 5,000 years. Seemingly attached to tree branches, but actually much farther in the distance, are the bright orbs of Saturn (left) and Mars. These planets formed along with the Earth and the early Solar System much earlier— about 4.5 billion years ago. Swooping down diagonally from the upper left is the oldest structure pictured: the central band of our Milky Way Galaxy—dating back around 9 billion years. The featured image was built from several exposures all taken from the same location—but only a few weeks ago.

Ancient Bristlecone Pine Forest (California, USA)
www.fs.usda.gov/detail/inyo/specialplaces/?cid=stelprdb5129900

Image Credit & Copyright: Brad Goldpaint (Goldpaint Photography)
Brad's website: www.goldpaintphotography.com
Release Date: June 19, 2016

+Brad Goldpaint 
+Astronomy Picture of the Day (APoD) 

#NASA #Astronomy #Space #Science #Stars #MilkyWay #Galaxy #Saturn #Mars #SolarSystem #Astrophotography #Art #Earth #Ancient #Bristlecone #Pine #Forest #APoD
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"The most detailed ever satellite maps of England’s dark skies."
Northumberland enjoys the very darkest skies, while light from London, the North West, major roads and stadiums particularly blights our view of the s...
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More than 80% of the world's population lives under light-polluted skies, a study suggests.
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This seems obvious since most of the population live in cities.

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Mars over Mount Rainier
Don: "Right now we are at our closest point to Mars that we have been in 10 years. So, it is incredibly bright. You can see it in this image to the right of the Milky Way. The mountains up front are the Tatoosh Range, a ridge off of Mount Rainier basically. Behind them you can see Mount Adam, St. Helens and Portland glowing in the distance."

Credit: Don Jensen
Don's website: DonKJensen.com
Location: Mount Rainier, Washington state, United States
Date: May 31, 2016

+Commission for Dark Skies 

#Astronomy #Space #Science #Mount #Ranier #Adams #Portland #Stratovolcano #Volcano #Washington #PacificNorthwest #USA #UnitedStates #MilkyWay #Galaxy #Stars #Panorama #Astrophotography #Art #Cosmos #Universe #LightPollution
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The New World Atlas of Artificial Sky Brightness
How far are you from a naturally dark night sky? In increasing steps, this world map (medium | large) shows the effect of artificial night sky brightness on the visual appearance of the night sky. The brightness was modeled using high resolution satellite data and fit to thousands of night sky brightness measurements in recent work. Color-coded levels are compared to the natural sky brightness level for your location. For example, artificial sky brightness levels in yellow alter the natural appearance of the night sky. In red they hide the Milky Way in an artificial luminous fog. The results indicate that the historically common appearance of our galaxy at night is now lost for more than one-third of humanity. That includes 60% of Europeans and almost 80% of North Americans, along with inhabitants of other densely populated, light-polluted regions of planet Earth.

Image Credit & License: F. Falchi et al., Light Pollution Atlas, ISTIL
http://advances.sciencemag.org/content/2/6/e1600377
ISTIL: www.istil.it/indexit.html
Release Date: June 30, 2016

+Astronomy Picture of the Day (APoD) 
+Commission for Dark Skies 
+International Dark-Sky Association 

#NASA #Earth #Space #Satellite #Science #LightPollution #Stars #MilkyWay #Galaxy #Cosmos #Universe #Atlas #APoD
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Night Glow: Mount St. Helens Volcano
Don: "Mount St. Helens illuminated at night under the Milky Way from the light pollution from Portland."

Mount St. Helens National Volcanic Monument
www.fs.usda.gov/recarea/giffordpinchot/recarea/?recid=34143

Mount St. Helens or Louwala-Clough (known as Lawetlat'la to the indigenous Cowlitz people, and Loowit to the Klickitat) is an active stratovolcano located in Skamania County, Washington, in the Pacific Northwest region of the United States. It is 96 miles (154 km) south of Seattle, Washington, and 50 miles (80 km) northeast of Portland, Oregon. Mount St. Helens takes its English name from the British diplomat Lord St Helens, a friend of explorer George Vancouver who made a survey of the area in the late 18th century. The volcano is located in the Cascade Range and is part of the Cascade Volcanic Arc, a segment of the Pacific Ring of Fire that includes over 160 active volcanoes. This volcano is well known for its ash explosions and pyroclastic flows. (Source: Wikipedia)

Credit: Don Jensen
Don's website: DonKJensen.com
Location: Mount St. Helens, Washington state, United States
Image Date: June 7, 2016

+Commission for Dark Skies

#Astronomy #Space #Science #Stars #MilkyWay #Galaxy #Astrophotography #Art #Panorama #Earth #MountSaintHelens
#Mount #SaintHelens #Volcano #Stratovolcano #Washington #State #USA #UnitedStates #LightPollution
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Open Access paper.

Abstract

Artificial lights raise night sky luminance, creating the most visible effect of light pollution—artificial skyglow. Despite the increasing interest among scientists in fields such as ecology, astronomy, health care, and land-use planning, light pollution lacks a current quantification of its magnitude on a global scale. To overcome this, we present the world atlas of artificial sky luminance, computed with our light pollution propagation software using new high-resolution satellite data and new precision sky brightness measurements. This atlas shows that more than 80% of the world and more than 99% of the U.S. and European populations live under light-polluted skies. The Milky Way is hidden from more than one-third of humanity, including 60% of Europeans and nearly 80% of North Americans. Moreover, 23% of the world’s land surfaces between 75°N and 60°S, 88% of Europe, and almost half of the United States experience light-polluted nights.
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"Moths’ role as pollinators is disrupted in brightly lit urban areas, finds research"
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Spring Sky over Pioneer Farmstead
Location: Alberta, Canada
Alan: "How many sources of skyglow can you pick out here?"

• The Milky Way
• Airglow
• Light pollution (too much!)
• Perpetual northern twilight
• Aurora

"The Milky Way (at left) arches over an old pioneer farmstead from the 1930s and 40s near home in southern Alberta. Mars (very bright and in some clouds) and Saturn shine at lower centre, while Jupiter is the bright object in clouds at right just above the old house. Arcturus is the brightest star here at upper right of centre, made more obvious here by shining through the clouds. The Big Dipper, distorted by the map projection used in the this panorama, is at upper right."

"Light pollution from Strathmore and Calgary lights the clouds coming in from the west. Green airglow is visible below the Milky Way. Twilight provides the blue to the northern sky at either end. There’s a very slight aurora low in the north but hardly noticeable."

Credit: Alan Dyer
Alan's Website: http://amazingsky.net
Location: Alberta, Canada
Release Date: May 29, 2016

Technical details: "This is a 360° horizon to zenith panorama taken with the iPano motorized panning unit, using the 24mm lens at f/2.8 and Nikon D750 at ISO 6400, for a stitch of 28 panels, in 4 tiers of 7 segments each. Stitched with PTGui. South is at centre, north to either end. The original is 25,700 x 7,700 pixels."

+Alan Dyer 
+TELUS Spark 
+TELUS Spark, the new Science Centre 
+TELUS World of Science Edmonton 
+Commission for Dark Skies
+National Science Teachers Association 

#Astronomy #Space #Science #Stars #MilkyWay #Galaxy #Skyglow #Airglow #Aurora #Mars #Saturn #Jupiter #Planets #Astrophotography #Art #Panorama #SolarSystem #Cosmos #Universe #Earth #Canada #Alberta #STEM #Education #LightPollution 
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"Development's glare ruining view at Westford's MIT observatory"
WESTFORD -- Tim Brothers can see dwarf planets and asteroids from the MIT Wallace Astrophysical Observatory, but not as often as he could a few years ago, before nearby development started clouding his view with light pollution.
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Have them in circles
1,680 people
Harm Otten's profile photo
Jake Self's profile photo
Jeunes Science Medjez El Beb's profile photo
North York Moors National Park's profile photo
Tal'Ki's profile photo
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Restore our natural, starry skies by reducing inefficient lighting.
Introduction
The Commission for Dark Skies (CfDS) aims to preserve and restore the beauty of the night sky by campaigning against excessive, inefficient and irresponsible lighting that shines where it is not wanted nor needed.

It was founded in 1989 and is part of the British Astronomical Association (BAA) and affiliated with the International Dark-Sky Association (IDA).

The issues raised by light pollution do not only affect astronomers.  Other areas of concern include crime, the environment and health.

Glare and light spill can make it more difficult to see in the dark. Nocturnal wildlife, such as bats and moths, and plants, eg which use day length to monitor seasons, can be affected. So can migrating birds. Intrusive light can, for example, disrupt sleep.

Some of the pages on the Campaign for Dark Skies website:
Publications about light pollution:

Books:

Light Pollution: Responses and Remedies, 2nd Edition, Bob Mizon, Springer, was published on 24 June 2012. The first version of the book is still available: Light Pollution: Responses and RemediesBob Mizon, Springer, 2002. On amazon.co.uk 'Look Inside!' is enabled for both books. The previews include contents and index.


There Once Was a Sky Full of Stars, Bob Crelin and Amie Ziner, Sky Publishing Corporation, 2007.

Reports:

Light Pollution and Astronomy, House of Commons Science and Technology Committee, 2003 [pdf]

Artificial Light in the Environment, The Royal Commission on Environmental Pollution, 2009. [pdf]


Guidance for the Reduction of Obtrusive Light, ILP, 2012. [pdf, automatic download]

A Review of the Impact of Artificial Light on Invertebrates, Charlotte Bruce-White and Matt Shardlow, Buglife, 2011. [pdf]

DVD:

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