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There are quite a few GDG New York folks who either commute from the Greater Hudson Valley area (Westchester county and above) or know someone who does..

Help us spread the word about the launch of GDG Hudson Valley, a sibling chapter that we are helping start up to provide needed learning, networking and collaborating opportunities for both students and professionals in those local communities.

Circle +GDG Hudson Valley today to be notified about upcoming events or projects in that area. (Hint: We will be announcing the first event very soon so keep an eye on that page..)
 
#twt  Excited to kick off the Google Developers (GDG) Hudson Valley chapter today.

If you live in the Greater Hudson Valley and are a developer, designer, entrepreneur, student, educator or curious technologist - come join us!! 

https://plus.google.com/u/0/b/116637480947982055865/116637480947982055865/about#
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RSVPs just opened up for this event -- please RSVP via our meetup page at:
http://www.meetup.com/NYC-GDG/events/174900952/
 
We're meeting at Google Chelsea Market 2nd Floor. Please RSVP on Meetup (at http://www.meetup.com/NYC-GDG/events/174900952/). The RSVPs will open up a week before the event.

========= Agenda (may be updated) ====================

FEATURED TALK: "DevOps and Google Cloud Platform", 
Speaker: Jason Hall  (Software Engineer @Google focused on Source Control and DeveloperTools integration with Google Cloud Platform)

DEV TALK: "Using Apps Script and BigQuery to process civic data"
Speaker: Ralph Yozzo
If you want to attempt to understand the New York State Property Tax system, BigQuery is a useful tool. 

Creating Applications with almost no setup.
See http://taxreform.brooklyncoop.org for a simple example what you can do with Apps Script and Big Query to understand "quasi big data"  
See http://timingblog.brooklynmarathon.com/2014/03/the-inequities-of-new-york-city-and-new.html and http://timingblog.brooklynmarathon.com/2014/03/compare-your-new-york-city-property-tax.html
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We're meeting at Google Chelsea Market 2nd Floor. Please RSVP on Meetup (at http://www.meetup.com/NYC-GDG/events/174900952/). The RSVPs will open up a week before the event.

========= Agenda (may be updated) ====================

FEATURED TALK: "DevOps and Google Cloud Platform", 
Speaker: Jason Hall  (Software Engineer @Google focused on Source Control and DeveloperTools integration with Google Cloud Platform)

DEV TALK: "Using Apps Script and BigQuery to process civic data"
Speaker: Ralph Yozzo
If you want to attempt to understand the New York State Property Tax system, BigQuery is a useful tool. 

Creating Applications with almost no setup.
See http://taxreform.brooklyncoop.org for a simple example what you can do with Apps Script and Big Query to understand "quasi big data"  
See http://timingblog.brooklynmarathon.com/2014/03/the-inequities-of-new-york-city-and-new.html and http://timingblog.brooklynmarathon.com/2014/03/compare-your-new-york-city-property-tax.html
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March 26 2014 Meetup 
 
Photos from the Mar 26, 2014 Meetup at +GDG New York -- we were fortunate to have +Paul Kinlan (talking Mobile UX), +Steven J. Dale (kicking off a Dev+Art-inspired series of talks on creative coders), +Dario Laverde (talking Android Wear) and +Roman Nurik (taking Q&A on Android Wear design and SDK).

We had a capacity crowd (originally 170 RSVPs) and a lot of interest in all topics on the agenda. We will probably do follow-up talks in both the Dev+Art series and on Wearables, and hopefully a Mobile Web talk focusing on PageSpeedInsights in future as well.

http://www.meetup.com/NYC-GDG/events/170470512/

#gdg  #report #stories 
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The genesis of Google code jams..
 
The Creation of a Code Jam Problem

Since its inception in 2003, Google’s Code Jam has drawn the top amateur and professional coders in the world together in a contest to determine who will stand alone as Code Jam Champion. Now in its 11th year, Code Jam once again will be throwing intense algorithmic puzzles at programmers from around the world starting April 11, 2014.

To provide a behind-the-scenes glimpse of what is involved in the problem development for Code Jam, we recently sat down with two members of the Code Jam development team, Software Engineers +Bartholomew Furrow and +Igor Naverniouk, two of the four people who founded Google's Code Jam team in June 2007. 

Bartholomew learned to love computer science while earning a B.Sc. in Physics from Queen's University, when he discovered programming contests. In 2006, shortly after obtaining a M.Sc. in Physics from the University of British Columbia (UBC) with his thesis "A Panoply of Quantum Algorithms", Bartholomew joined Google's Ads Quality team.

Igor started programming in the first grade, when he learned to create his own games with his father’s IBM 286 computer. While working on his B.Sc. at the UBC, he was lured to his first programming competition by a poster promising free pizza.  He has been competing, coaching teams, creating problems for competitions, and eating pizza ever since.

Prior to working together as part of the Code Jam team at Google, Igor and Bartholomew were also teammates on the UBC ACM International Collegiate Programming Contest (ICPC) team. 

Read on to learn part of the development of a Code Jam problem:

------

Research at Google: Every year, Code Jam comes up with 26 coding problems. Can you explain the process of how the challenges are developed and a sense of how long it takes? Who comes up with them? 

Igor Naverniouk: Submissions of potential coding challenges for Code Jam start pretty much immediately after the finals are over, so nearly a full year is spent in preparing. Initially, any individual at Google can submit a problem they think has potential to be a good challenge, which then goes through selection and development by a team of 15-20 Google engineers who devote 20% of their time to Code Jam.

There is a variety of methods by which we come up with a problem; generally, one of us might read a paper and learn about an interesting algorithm and then see how to form it in an interesting puzzle. Or we might use a real-life problem, something we encounter at work or in daily life, that could be automated. It’s fun to take examples from everyday life and construct a challenge from it, especially if it’s something that people haven’t thought of from a computer science perspective. I think it makes participants feel like they they have solved something that’s relevant, and to feel good about that.

Bartholomew Furrow: A good example of a problem that was inspired by a real-life problem would be Candy Store, from the 2010 Code Jam Finals (http://goo.gl/K1oZl9). It is one of my favorites because it was a problem I was trying to solve myself. I wanted to figure out the minimum number of dumbbells I'd need to purchase, so that I could lift any amount I wanted to in each hand. It was a good example of a Greedy Algorithm (http://goo.gl/8tGCp0) and the genesis of Candy Store, which has a really wonderful greedy solution.

IN: The ideas don’t have to be thoroughly thought out, initially. The team reviews all the problem ideas, and anonymously ranks them based on originality, creativity, whether it is motivated by a real world problem, and whether it is a purely algorithmic problem or if a simple mathematical solution exists. 

R@G: You distinguish between algorithmic and mathematical puzzles. Are there any problems that are quite challenging algorithmically but can be solved more simply if mathematical principles are used?

IN: The Revenge of the Hot Dog Vendor (http://goo.gl/MQco5E) is a problem that comes to mind.  While it can be solved algorithmically, there is an elegant mathematical solution as well, that is a bit simpler to implement. It is also a puzzle related to something in real life; on a boardwalk or a beach you tend to see concession stands clustered together, but ideally you want the placement of concession stands to be optimally spread out so that people only walk the minimum distance to get something to eat. 

R@G: Once you have a list of potential problems for candidates, what are the next steps in the development of a problem before it ends up in the competition?

BF: Once the ideas are there, the next step is to carefully prepare the problem statement. A lot of time is spent on this, making sure it is understandable to both native and non-native english speakers. Anything that is really important about the problem we state twice, we give examples to try and make the problem statement as clear as possible…

IN: After that comes the development and testing of the input data for the large and small test cases for the problem, as well as the generation of sample I/O that is displayed in the problem statement. Of course, there is substantial testing to verify the solutions of the problem, providing sample solutions, proofreading…

BF: …in all I’d say it takes roughly 5-40 engineering hours, depending on the difficulty, to fully develop a single problem after it has been selected, and there are 26 problems in total. That’s a lot of time to spend, in addition to normal job responsibilities, but we want to make sure that Code Jam is a medium for problems that are accessible to a wide variety of skill levels, but challenging enough that skilled competitors aren’t bored.

R@G: How do you strike that balance of accessibility and making the problems challenging? 

IN: Well, it’s hard. We haven’t gotten 100% there…

BF: …But I think it’s okay if we have a problem that nobody solves in the final round, like we did in 2010 (http://goo.gl/N5j5Ex) and 2011 (http://goo.gl/3FqSG7). We love to have people discussing a really challenging problem for months after, that’s awesome! But for the earlier online rounds, everyone should be able to solve something. The problems should be simple to explain and relatively straightforward to solve.  
 
IN: We also release the code for solutions and provide an analysis; what the steps are and why we think this is the best solution, so if anyone cannot solve one of the problems, they can come back and see how the solution is implemented. In addition to being a challenging contest, we also want Code Jam to be accessible to aspiring coders, those who are just starting out. I think its useful to be able to go back and read the solution to a problem that you have struggled with, and see the different ways in which it was solved, and build up one’s skill set.

R@G: With Code Jam going into its 11th year, in addition to other programming competitions out there, such as ICPC and TopCoder, how do you ensure problems aren’t repeated?

IN: We rely on the Googlers who participate in a lot of contests, people who are able to recognize problems from other competitions. But, even if we did end up with a problem that is functionally similar to one presented in the past, it would be very difficult copy/paste answers or adapt it to one presented at Code Jam, as subtle changes in a problem can make a huge difference in the solution. 

BF: I believe that the incredible variety and permutations possible, even in similar problems, it is a testament to the beauty of computer science and algorithms. Code Jam really is a creative enterprise. I find it fascinating that a mathematical or algorithmic endeavor could have the same variety as, for example, painting. It is an art; our tools are just different from those of traditional artists. There really are a lot of beautiful, fun, and interesting non-conventional problems out there that are challenging, and can push the boundaries of computer science.

Registration for Code Jam 2014 opened March 11th. The Qualification Round will begin April 11th so be sure you register today, at http://goo.gl/j9wVyM.
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Just a reminder for folks interested in attending Google I/O and looking to buy a ticket. Note that the registration process is different this year. The registration window opens tomorrow (April 15) and closes April 18. 

For more on the registration process, read:
https://www.google.com/events/io/help#!/registration
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Hi all -- for those who are wondering when the registration starts, it looks like the window opens at 4pm PDT (or 7pm EST)  https://www.google.com/events/io/registration/gateway/preopenreg.html
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Glass Developer Office Hours Hangout announced..
 
Hi Explorers!

Are you building Glassware and stuck? If so, we're here to help. +Jenny Murphy and +Allen Firstenberg are hosting this hangout to field your questions about developing for Glass.

This hangout is a technical Q&A, so please come armed with your questions. Plan to hop in, ask your question, and hop out to make room for others. Space will open up as people get their answers, so if you don't get in right away, please keep knocking.

We'll post a link to the hangout on this event once it starts.

This hangout isn't going to be live streamed or recorded.
Glass Developer Office Hours: A Hangout for Glass Explorers Everywhere
Tomorrow, April 17, 3:00 PM
A hangout (Link will be posted here when the event starts)

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If you missed +EdgeConf last week, fear not! The edited and captioned videos have been uploaded to YouTube at http://goo.gl/4luV1O

* Components - http://goo.gl/JREj6s
* Developer Tooling - http://goo.gl/ldNevl
* Build Process - http://goo.gl/d4wclB
* Page Load Performance - http://goo.gl/qqGkWS
* Pointers and Interactions - http://goo.gl/ywBAUw
* Accessibility - http://goo.gl/95czH6
 * Future Web - http://goo.gl/LpvVLL
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Here are +Paul Kinlan's slides from his talk on "Mobile UX" at the GDG New York Meetup last night.

And if you're interested in Mobile Web Development, do check out (and join) the community Paul moderates on G+
https://plus.google.com/communities/104841066116621504107
 
Thanks to everyone who attended my NYC GDG talk on mobile ux last night.  Here are my slides.
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PLEASE RSVP FOR THIS EVENT ON OUR MEETUP SITE BELOW
http://www.meetup.com/NYC-GDG/events/170470512/

This is going to be a terrific event. On the agenda:

==============================================
Featured Talk:
Mobile UX: From a Developer
Speaker: +Paul Kinlan(Google Chrome Developer Advocate). 

This should be a really good talk for anyone interested in mobile web app design, development and performance matters. Paul is a Google Chrome Dev Advocate specializing in mobile. He is also "Mr. Web Intents" and runs the hugely popular G+ Mobile Web Development Community. He owns the Chrome WebLab OpenSource Project and is a key member of the Google  Dev+Art initiative.

==============================================
Dev+Art Talk:
Make Parallels
Speaker: Steven J. Dale (@lifeinchords)

Dev+Art is a Google competition that seeks to encourage the use of code and technology to devise, enhance or create art in various forms (physical or digital). Deadline for submissions is Mar 28, 2014. To support the initiative, we will feature speakers/projects at the intersection of code, design and art. 

We kick things off with Steven J. Dale (designer, sound artist, RemixNYC co-organizer), who will present Parallels, a free, digital tool for fluidly creating and remixing digital documents, which are shared and connected as a digital library.

==============================================
Android+Wearables: AndroidWear
Speaker: +Dario Laverde 

Google just announced the Developer Preview of AndroidWear, extending Android support to a new generation of wearable devices, with user experiences specifically tailored for discreet alerts and resource-constrained contexts. 

We'll review key features of this platform and have an open Q&A session about what this means for designers and developers. 

==============================================
Lightning Talks:

Open call for members wishing to do a lightning talk (5-10 mins) on topics of interest to our community. Contact the organizers in advance to reserve a spot, or just find us during the event and we'll pencil you in (time permitting).

==============================================
GDG New York March Meetup: Mobile UX, DevArt, AndroidWear .. and more
Wed, March 26, 6:30 PM
Google Chelsea Market Office 75 Ninth Ave, Floor 4, NY

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Thanks! Appreciate it!

Nikolai Chowdhury / 1.908.432.0447
Sent from my iPhone
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The place in New York City where engineers, programmers, and geeks go to share and learn about Google technologies.
Introduction
We generally meet on the last Wednesday of each month.  The format of the meetings varying from presenters to individual interactive groups that focus on one technology in detail.  Check our Meetup page for the details of upcoming meetings and to view the content of previous meetings.

GDG New York City is an independent group; our activities and the opinions expressed on this +Page should in no way be linked to Google, the corporation.

#gdg #2014 future plans: (our 5th year!)
Dart flight School CodeLab Women in tech events, DevArt events,  Google Glass workshops and hackathons, and much much more.  Plus we're expanding to include subchapters starting with the Hudson Valley subchapter of the NYC-GDG!

#gdg #2013 summary of activities:
December: Objective-C Client Library for Google APIs, Chrome Dev Summit Highlights,  Android KitKat Overview, Glass GDK, 248 members
October: Google+ Sign-In, API Explorer and OAuth 2 Playground tools, Google Web Designer, Android+Glass, 141 members
September: Meteor JS!, 98 members
August: Android 4.3 featuring Restricted Profiles, ActionBarCompat and an overview of all the new 4.3 features, 204 members
July: Android 4.3, Google Play Developer Console in practice, Navigation Drawer best practices, Language Dynamism vs Battery Life, 218 members
June:  Android: A Deep Dive Into ViewPager, AppScript and Google Drive + Android, Android Monetization, 172 members
May: Google I/O recap!, 111 members
April: AngularJS Exposed, Google Glass, 120 members
March: Cloud Platform Developer Tools, Starting on App Engine with Python, 122 members
Feb: HyperDex Warp, Angular JS, Heating Your House via Android, 
Jan:  Paxos works and the impact it has on distributed systems,  Google Knowledge Graph, 159 members


#gdg #2012 summary of activities:
December 12 GDG Festive Meetup - 176 members October 23 BigQuery, Oauth 2.0, and Big Data with Go 172 members September 26 Using the Google APIs 174 members July 18 Post Google IO Recap 173 members May 2 May NYC Google Developer Group - Google Hangout API 175 members February 22 Solving Problems with Google Technologies 148 members January 26 Developing for Ice Cream Sandwich (Android Joint Meetup)

There's also been a weekly study/project group for Android (and now Glass):

more info available at http://www.meetup.com/NYC-GDG