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Gary Longsine
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ideas have consequences
ideas have consequences

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According to a recent article in Business Insider, roughly 8% of the apps on the iOS App Store are not ready for iOS 11 (survey by Sensor Tower, an app intelligence firm). Our (illumineX) own informal survey indicates that for users with more than 50 apps on their device, around 15% of those apps are not yet ready for iOS 11 (it varies quite a bit, clustering between 10% and 20%). The technical challenges of updating for iOS 11 are perhaps non-trivial, but they're well within the reach of the typical iOS development team.

So, why are so many apps on the verge of being abandoned? Some vendors might be waiting for the release of iOS 11 to update their app. But that might not be the only reason, or even the main reason, given that roughly 90% of app vendors have updated, already.

Something else might be at work.

I suspect some app owners/vendors aren't sure about how to move their app forward—not due to technical updates needed for 64-bit iOS, but because their app isn't performing as well as they would like in the market.

I'd like to know more about the challenges faced by organizations trying to update their apps for iOS 11.

If you have an app and would like to talk about the business and marketing aspects which will help you decide whether or not to update your app, feel free to contact me, directly via email: gary@illumineX.com any time.

Let's chat about your original goals for your app, changing technology and market conditions which affect your app performance, and whatever else you see as a factor in your decision to maintain or abandon your app. Maybe there's a better exit strategy, than simply abandoning an underperforming app with a great concept. Maybe our conversation will help you identify opportunities to refresh your app and meet your objectives.

It strikes me as odd that so many apps are on the brink of being wiped off the app store. I won't accidentally shame anybody here by naming apps, but some of these apps were clearly intended as substantial marketing efforts of major organizations, including radio stations, universities, large companies. Others look like really good app ideas that might not be fully realized (suffer from poor UX (User eXperience) or which suffer issues with the monetization / business model.

Anyway, I'd love to chat with some folk who are wrestling with the question of whether or not to update their apps for iOS 11. Let's chat and see if we come up with a good idea for your team. This might be a great opportunity to deeply rethink your app, and boost your app performance.
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“It might surprise you to learn that hydrogen-fusing-into-helium makes up less than half of all nuclear reactions in our Sun, and that it’s also responsible for less than half of the energy that the Sun eventually outputs. There are strange, unearthly phenomena along the way: the diproton that usually just decays back to the original protons that made it, positrons spontaneously emitted from unstable nuclei, and in a small (but important) percentage of these reactions, a rare mass-8 nucleus, something you’ll never find naturally occurring here on Earth. But that’s the nuclear physics of where the Sun gets its energy from, and it’s so much richer than the simple fusion of hydrogen into helium!”

Ask anyone where the Sun (or any star) gets its energy from, and most people will correctly answer “nuclear fusion.” But if you ask what’s getting fused, most people – including most scientists – will tell you that the Sun fuses hydrogen into helium, and that’s what powers it. It’s true that the Sun uses hydrogen as its initial fuel, and that helium-4 is indeed the end product, but the individual reactions that take place to turn hydrogen into helium are surprisingly diverse and intricate. There are actually four major reactions that take place in the sun: fusing two protons into deuterium, fusing deuterium and a proton into helium-3, fusing two helium-3 nuclei into helium-4, and fusing helium-3 and helium-4 in a chain reaction to produce two helium-4 nuclei. Note that only one of those reactions actually turns hydrogen into helium, and that’s not what makes up either the majority of reactions or the majority of the Sun’s energy!

The Sun fuses hydrogen into helium, but that’s not the only thing that powers it. Come find out how the Sun really works today!
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Carl Sagan - How We Know The Earth Is Round
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The Falcon Heavy should bring asteroid mining projects into the "here and now".
SpaceX’s Falcon Heavy Rocket Has Completed Its Final First Stage Core Tests
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Not only is there big money to be made for delivery of useful metals to Earth, but we can start doing things that aren't feasible, yet. If we deliver enough Platinum group metals to Earth's industry we can solve problems, help the environment, raise standards of living around the globe. This is a win-win-win-win project.
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Throwing ideas at the wall and seeing what sticks is the Google way but is it working?
Does design Darwinism work? Look at the current messenger, allo, duo, hangouts, hangout chat, hangout video mess and the graveyard of retired products like spaces, chat, wave and others.
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DeepMind's new algorithm adds 'memory' to AI

"Previously, we had a system that could learn to play any game, but it could only learn to play one game," James Kirkpatrick, a research scientist at DeepMind and the lead author of its new research paper, tells WIRED. "Here we are demonstrating a system that can learn to play several games one after the other". The work, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences journal, explains how DeepMind's AI can learn in sequences using supervised learning and reinforcement learning tests. This is also explained in a blog post from the company. "The ability to learn tasks in succession without forgetting is a core component of biological and artificial intelligence," the computer scientists write in the paper. Kirkpatrick says a "significant shortcoming" in neural networks and artificial intelligence has been its inability to transfer what it has learned from one task to the next. The group says it has been able to show "continual learning" that's based on 'synaptic consolidation'. In the human brain, the process is described as "the basis of learning and memory".
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"Our politicians may deny it. Our corporations may deny it. And even the secretary of state and the president may deny it. But denying it doesn't change reality. The Earth is warming; we are the cause; the consequences are severe and increasing; it's up to all of us to do something about it. Even with La Niña in place for 2017, global temperature levels are likely to never sink back to the 20th century average, not for a single year in the 21st century. The Earth belongs to us all, including all the humans who'll come after us. If we have any hope of taking care of it, it has to start with accepting the truth. Even if it's inconvenient." http://www.forbes.com/sites/startswithabang/2017/01/18/climate-science-isnt-political-lying-about-it-is/#425f2413f854
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The latest climate findings hint at a bad-news, good-news situation for us folks in the Pacific Northwest.
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