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Lucas Marcucci
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please watch! excellent!!!

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NASA rejection letter
NASA Rejection Letter
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Completely Synthetic Human Bodies
SynDaver™ Labs manufactures the world's most sophisticated synthetic human tissues and body parts. Their SynDaver™ Synthetic Human bleeds, breathes, and employs hundreds of replaceable muscles, bones, organs, and vessels which are made from materials that mimic the mechanical, thermal, and physico-chemical properties of live tissue. This validated technology is used to replace live animals, cadavers, and human patients in medical device studies, clinical training, and surgical simulation.

Their first public testing and training lab is now open in Tampa, Florida. This facility stocks SynTissue™ synthetic human tissues, SynDaver™ synthetic human body parts, and SynAtomy™ partial task trainers - and incorporates a test and training center to enable those unfamiliar with their products to work with them firsthand.

Their first external sites are opening in Portland, Oregon and Phoenix, Arizona in Quarter2 2013. New SynDaver™ satellite facilities are also planned for San Antonio, Boston, Minneapolis, Washington, Singapore, Mexico City (Mexico), Riyadh (Saudi Arabia), Cambridge (United Kingdom), Brussels (Belgium), and Paris (France) in the near future.
http://www.syndaver.com/
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The Science of The Zombie Brain

Carry the One Radio, our newest +ScienceSunday  content partner,  brings us another fascinating podcast looking at the  science of brains through the lens of the  Zombie Brain!

Catch the podcast here: http://www.carrytheoneradio.com/episode/2013-10-31

The What - No, zombies are not real (at least not yet), but that does not mean we can’t enjoy analyzing their mental capacities.

The Who - This is the work of Brad Voytek, scientist at UCSF and our guest this month on Carry the One Radio. When Brad isn’t busy with his scientific research mapping the prefrontal cortex, the part of the brain that makes us human, he “studies” the effects of zombification on the brain. He uses this work as a fun way to teach neuroscience. Listen as Brad describes the zombie brain and how it can help us teach how the human brain might work.

*Keep tuning in for more great content from Carry the One Radio here at +ScienceSunday!

#ScienceSunday   #SciSunRDB  
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Study Finds Girls Entering Puberty Younger; Obesity Implicated

"Building on earlier research a major new study has found that girls are starting puberty at even younger ages. The most significant changes were seen in Caucasian girls and in girls who are overweight or obese. Still, girls who were not overweight were also entering puberty younger, the study found."

Read more from +KQED Health. 

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A Professional Lab Inside A Lake

"On Lake Stechlin in Germany, researchers at the Leibniz Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries have created a wild environment that they can manipulate as they please in order to run controlled tests. LakeLab is a group of enclosures that delineate 24 miniature lakes."

Learn more from Popular Science: http://goo.gl/PSkaPY
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Herbal Supplements Are Often Not What They Seem:

A study using DNA testing offers perhaps the most credible evidence to date of adulteration, contamination and mislabeling in the herbal #supplement industry.

Using a test called DNA barcoding, a kind of genetic fingerprinting that has also been used to help uncover labeling fraud in the commercial seafood industry, Canadian researchers tested 44 bottles of popular supplements sold by 12 companies. They found (http://goo.gl/rmpf0i) that many were not what they claimed to be, and that pills labeled as popular herbs were often diluted — or replaced entirely — by cheap fillers like soybean, wheat and rice.

Read more: http://goo.gl/ZEVOiG

[Article via: +The New York Times / +University of Guelph Alumni  www.biodiversity.uoguelph.ca | Photo: Flickr/Ano Lobb.@healthyrx]
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US scientists have developed, using mice and macaques, a potential vaccine for respiratory syncytial virus that is now scheduled to enter early-stage human clinical trials. RSV is the most common cause of bronchiolitis and pneumonia in children less than a year old, and is responsible for nearly 7% of deaths in babies worldwide.

http://www.nih.gov/news/health/oct2013/niaid-31.htm

Image Credit: NIH
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