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The New Centre for Research & Practice
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Accelerate Academia
Accelerate Academia

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LOCATION: 
The New School
25 E 13th Room 302 

TIME: 6:30-8:30 PM EST


Panel: Tom McGlynn, Ben Woodard, & Tony Yanick
Respondents: Jason Adams, Yvette Granata, & Alice Lucy Rekab (film response: "Conjuncture-in-film")

Co-Hosted by The Center for Transformative Media at The New School & The New Centre for Research & Practice (Live Online Stream).

Description:
Since the explosion of speculative theories, almost a decade ago, aesthetics has remained an active field of contention and mediation. The supposed limits of anthropocentrism, anthropomorphism, epistemology, and strong ontology all come to a head in an amorphous melange . Despite this rather open field, certain terms remain stubbornly problematic: namely the very concept of aesthetics and that of representation and representationalism. Reconsidering the representations of supposedly democratized worlds, whether via an appeal to immanence (either in a Deleuzian or Laruellean sense), or to newer theories of the flatness (or continuity) of facticity, consistently problematizes the valorization of the aesthetic as a field intimately bound to human sensory and conceptual capacities. Categories or genres of sense are not synonymous with sense perception, but rather parallel structures with which the real can be considered “as real”. This “as real” is not a mere simulation of worlds, but perhaps a less- determinate, yet more fully actualized, aesthetics. 

Special thanks to Ed Keller and The Center for Transformative Media for hosting this event.

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INSTRUCTOR: Mohammad Salemy 

MODULE: 1 of 2 

DATE & TIME: Tuesdays: October 28th; Nov. 4th, 11th, & 18th. 6:30 PM - 9:00 PM EST

Jans Hoffman: “How, in just a few short years, did we reach this point of self-referential saturation?” /// Elena Filipovic: “Implicit in the question is thus not so much what the meaning of the exhibition is as a category/genre/object, but what it does, which is to say, how exhibitions function and matter, and how they participate in the construction and administration of the experience of the items they present.” /// João Ribas: “Are we perhaps so concerned with the contemporary because we have failed to reconcile with finitude? That is, to conceive of a future beyond ecological disaster, technological singularity, or terror-fueled millenarianism?”

DESCRIPTION: The 20th century, particularly after the Second World War, witnessed the emergence of a new class of cultural producers named curators; working with artists, museum officials and private collectors. Through steady self-specialization, curators started to play a decisive role in the production of art and shaping the function of living artist. Over the last two decades, many universities have begun to offer curatorial studies programs, focusing on the development of the curator’s role in constructing associations between art, artists and audiences, as well as elaborating the significance of exhibitions as the key space for approaches to contemporary art and society.

The first in this two-module seminar, “Here & Now” will look critically at the role of curators in the systemization of art practices, as well as the globalized dissemination of contemporary art in the current decades. Throughout the seminar, the students will examine the impact of the growth of interest in contemporary art by different levels of the government and private sector, paying particular attention to the interaction and competition between cultural, political, and financial capital for shaping the future of the art world. In addition, we will engage how the evolving forms of nation-states on a global scale has contributed to the transformation of the idea and practice of curatorship locally. With a focus on both the inside and outside views of today’s curating, the seminar covers texts written by leading contemporary curators as well as contributions by theorists and thinkers who have problematized the practice of making and showing contemporary art. Each session will examine ideas discussed by curators against actual exhibitions and analyze their successes/failures in terms of realizing the curator’s own goals and objectives.

REQUIREMENTS: Students will attend seminar meetings and participate via Google+ Hangout. They will write short exhibition reviews (400 words) on a weekly basis as blog posts and a 2500 words research paper that will include at least two external sources on a specific theme related to the readings.

COST: Full Enrollment: 160 USD | Audit: 20 USD

DEADLINE FOR ENROLLMENT: Monday, October 27, 10 PM EST

FOR FULL ENROLLMENT: https://www.paypal.com/us/cgi-bin/webscr?cmd=_flow&SESSION=8xdAZ4UfSBabGNrEO1PFsa0PXX5pHeCX1tzs_7v1mwy-pmX1O_S6eyV8kpS&dispatch=50a222a57771920b6a3d7b606239e4d529b525e0b7e69bf0224adecfb0124e9b61f737ba21b08198cf7658296ddbf66bbd0b039a3775ce6f

FOR AUDIT: https://www.paypal.com/cgi-bin/webscr?cmd=_s-xclick&hosted_button_id=TLZF67CC6HYJS

The New Centre for Research & Practice: http://www.thenewcentre.org/

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INSTRUCTOR: Peter Wolfendale

MODULE: 1 of 2 

DATE & TIME: Thursdays: October 9th, 16th, 23rd, & 30th 10:00 AM - 12:30 PM EST; 3:00 PM - 5:30 PM GMT

DESCRIPTION: The end of metaphysics was a dominant theme in early 20th century philosophy. Even though the Western philosophical tradition sundered in two, one of the few things its analytic and continental halves seemed to agree upon was that the age of metaphysics was over, either because physics had finally usurped it or because philosophy had finally rooted out the pathological desires which drove us to speak of the fundamental structure of reality. The resurgence of metaphysics in the second half of the century in both traditions certainly came as a surprise, even if it has taken until the turn of the 21st century to become ingrained in both camps. However, despite its increasing popularity, there remains much confusion about precisely what metaphysics is: how does it sit within philosophy as a whole? How does it relate to the sciences (especially physics)? How do we go about doing it? The purpose of this seminar and its subsequent followup in Spring is to reintroduce metaphysics by considering these sorts of methodological questions, and to do so by explaining the history of its rise, fall, and rise again.

The Fall seminar, “The Speculative Return,” will examine the return of speculative metaphysics, focusing primarily on the emergence of 'Speculative Realism' and its ramifications. This will provide us with a way of framing the historical arc of the decline of metaphysics (correlationism) and some purchase upon what has potentially been overlooked in the drive to speculate (the critique of metaphysics). The seminar will address certain issues in contemporary metaphysics (e.g., is anything necessary? and what does it mean for ‘everything’ to exist?), but its principal aim will be to construct a historical narrative through which the related methodological questions can be properly articulated.

REQUIREMENTS: The seminar will be composed of four two and a half hour sessions, each of which will be split between an hour and an hour and a half lecture and around an hour of group discussion. Readings will be set for each week, and students will be expected to write 400 words on some aspect of the week’s topic in advance. This will be posted to the google classroom page for everyone to read and comment upon as they wish, providing some preliminary threads for the group discussion. The final assessment will consist of a 2500 word essay on a topic agreed upon with the instructor in advance.

COST: Full Enrollment: 160 USD | Audit: 20 USD

DEADLINE FOR ENROLLMENT: Wednesday, October 8 10 PM EST

ENROLL: https://www.paypal.com/us/cgi-bin/webscr?cmd=_flow&SESSION=ozACpr_R3MIRHsno78uv_LCZC1uePNrODXdXTQCtx7MLHBROIenXSkLdwrO&dispatch=50a222a57771920b6a3d7b606239e4d529b525e0b7e69bf0224adecfb0124e9b61f737ba21b08198cf7658296ddbf66bbd0b039a3775ce6f

NOTE: If you only plan to audit the seminar, use this link to pay:
https://www.paypal.com/cgi-bin/webscr?cmd=_s-xclick&hosted_button_id=CDLY4AEEX66EN

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INSTRUCTOR: Jason Adams 

GUESTS: Jasbir Puar and Jérôme Emanuel Roos

DATE & TIME: Sundays & Wednesdays: October 5th, 8th, 12th, & 15th 5:00 PM - 7:30 PM EST

DESCRIPTION: “My officers have the right to go home at night”: with this statement in August 2014, St. Louis Police Chief Sam Dotson both justified the summary execution of 25-year old Kajieme Powell and captured the essence of a political theory tradition of which he was most likely unaware: that of “decisionism”. Historically, decisionist political thought has sought to preserve the prerogative of the sovereign to remain unencumbered by the letter of the law in situations deemed to be emergencies, however an emergency might be defined. In recent years in particular, decisionism has not remained constrained to the domain of theory alone: indeed, Dotson’s justification emerged in media reports at the same time that another summary police execution (18-year old Michael Brown in Ferguson) had triggered mass protests that brought the National Guard into the streets. Such events, like the rise of City Council-displacing “Emergency Managers” in Detroit, Flint, Pontiac, and elsewhere, demonstrate the increasing ubiquity of a localized emergency governance that can no longer be separated from the globalized market economy that is its looming geopolitical frame. From postimperial theaters of worldwide war to local postindustrial and newly-industrialized municipalities, the rise of decisionist structures has been matched by an intensification of decisionist rhetoric: as Kevyn Orr, Emergency Manager of Detroit put it when questioned in May 2013, “I’m free, I’m not a politician”.

This seminar traces and reshapes the past and future of decisionism in political thought and state practice alike, providing an introduction to the thematic appropriate to the early 21st century, a time in which, as Deleuze & Guattari put it, “the totalitarian State is not a maximum state but rather... the minimum State of anarcho-capitalism”. We consider the 17th, 18th, and 19th century precursors to decisionism in the absolutist and monarchist reactions against the revolutions of England, Western Europe and the United States, including those of Thomas Hobbes, Hernando Donoso Cortes and Frances de Maistre. We also engage the 20th century decisionism of Carl Schmitt and Julius Evola, reading these in light of the radical political thought of Walter Benjamin and Giorgio Agamben. Overall, the seminar concerns arguments for and against the manner in which liberal governance structures retain monarchist / absolutist features, moving quickly to early 21st century thinkers for whom the need to think beyond neoreactionary and modern/postmodern liberalism alike are imperatives for our time, including Achille Mbembe, Jasbir Puar and Reza Negarestani. In tracing, rethinking and reshaping the decisionist form, we encounter the relationship between freedom and equality, the market and the state, grappling with the paradoxes that ensue from the fact that today’s decisionism renders freedom authoritarian and equality the privilege of a few.

REQUIREMENTS: The seminar will be composed of four 2.5 hour sessions, each of which will be split between an introduction to the session, a guest appearance, and student-facilitated group discussion, followed by instructor-facilitated Oxford/Williams-style tutorial presentations from the students on the readings, in relation to their research focus. Research foci for both instructors and students will derive from the application of the concept of decisionism to primary sources of information and data, engaging material problems and fields of knowledge through this process. Students will write four mini-essays of 500-1000 words for each session in relation to the student’s chosen research focus, due at the end of each week. The mini-essays will be posted to the Google Classroom page for everyone to read and comment upon, providing some preliminary threads for the group discussions, tutorials and final presentation or potential publication of research projects. The top pieces will be given extensive feedback for revision into a full paper and promoted by the professor for publication in leading academic and/or para-academic venues. 

COST: Full Enrollment: 160 USD | Audit: 20 USD


DEADLINE FOR REGISTRATION: Saturday, October 4 10 PM EST

ENROLL:
https://www.paypal.com/us/cgi-bin/webscr?cmd=_flow&SESSION=oni_YRGAo1ripd0Zm49D4QwT4orJifu0mxVmEjmHWSIbeRoNkSoOSh5IG30&dispatch=50a222a57771920b6a3d7b606239e4d529b525e0b7e69bf0224adecfb0124e9b61f737ba21b08198cf7658296ddbf66bbd0b039a3775ce6f

NOTE: If you only plan to audit the seminar, use this link to pay: https://www.paypal.com/cgi-bin/webscr?cmd=_s-xclick&hosted_button_id=6274TD4G5JUWS

The New Centre for Research & Practice: http://www.thenewcentre.org/

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INSTRUCTOR: Mohammad Salemy & Jason Adams
GUESTS: Diann Bauer, Benjamin Noys and Nick Srnicek

MODULE: 1 of 2, DATE & TIME: Mondays & Wednesdays: September 22, 23, 29, & Oct. 1 5:30 PM - 8:00 PM EST

“The Most important division in today’s left is between those that hold to a folk politics of localism, direct action, and relentless horizontalism, and those that outline what must be called an accelerationist politics at ease with the modernity of abstraction, complexity, globality, and technology.” -Alex Williams and Nick Srnicek

DESCRIPTION: This two part seminar will introduce the concepts of acceleration and accelerationism through the reading of the newly published book #Accelerate: The Accelerationist Reader (Urbanomic/Merve Verlag, 2014). The seminar follows the thematic structure of the book, focusing on concepts that anticipate, formulate, and shape the future of left accelerationist thought. It will examine and respond to the core accelerationist arguments and terminology proposed in the Reader which are becoming increasingly influential on political and theoretical debates. For example, the insufficiency of local politics in light of larger global problems; the failures of the Western left, both Marxist and poststructuralist; challenging the onslaught of neoliberalism; the rejection of the total destruction of capitalism; the proposal for salvaging usable parts of the current geopolitical system in our post capitalist future; and, finally, the embrace of science and technology both as practical but also as conceptual tools for restructuring the humanities and cultural studies. The wide historical spectrum which the volume suggests for Accelerationism allows this two-part seminar to focus on materials from Marx, Veblen, Deleuze, Comte, and Lyotard, to more contemporary sources contemplating capitalism and technology, such as the Cybernetic Cultures Research Unit (CCRU), Nick Land, Ray Brassier and Reza Negarestani. This Fall seminar will also feature conversations with some of the contributors to the volume as well as its skeptics who have partaken in the shaping of the accelerationist discourse.

REQUIREMENTS: The seminar will be composed of four two and a half hour sessions, each of which will be split between an hour and an hour and a half lecture and around an hour of group discussion. Readings will be set for each week, and students will be expected to write 400 words on some aspect of the week’s topic in advance. This will be posted to the google classroom page for everyone to read and comment upon as they wish, providing some preliminary threads for the group discussion. The final assessment will consist of a 2500 word essay on a topic agreed upon with the instructor in advance.

COST: Full Enrollment: 160 USD | Audit: 20 USD

DEADLINE: Sunday, September 21 10 PM EST

This is the first module of a two-part seminar.

NOTE: Use this link to purchase the e-book from BARNES & NOBLE: http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/accelerate-robin-mackay/1119854794?ean=9780957529526

To enroll visit: https://www.paypal.com/us/cgi-bin/webscr?cmd=_flow&SESSION=DQL_yA213os9P1Q67lSKYCvBgUcPZHbVH-sv0qk6pg5pN9RRdSbP2X3PLlC&dispatch=50a222a57771920b6a3d7b606239e4d529b525e0b7e69bf0224adecfb0124e9b61f737ba21b08198cf7658296ddbf66bbd0b039a3775ce6f

If you only plan to audit the seminar, use this link to pay:
https://www.paypal.com/cgi-bin/webscr?cmd=_s-xclick&hosted_button_id=E6AVV2QHGNYEA

To see our full list of Fall 2014 Seminars, please visit our website: http://thenewcentre.org/seminars/

The New Centre for Research & Practice: http://thenewcentre.org/

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Find out more about the New Centre by visiting our FAQ. If you still have questions that are not answered, please leave them here in the comments or send them to directly to info@thenewcentre.org.

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HTTP://THENEWCENTRE.ORG

We are very pleased to announce that the website for The New Centre for Research & Practice is now operational! 

Please visit the link to learn about our Programs and approaching Fall Season Seminars on #Accelerate: The Accelerationist Reader; on emergency government & decisionist political theory after Ferguson; on the neorationalist critique of speculative philosophy; on The Democracy of Objects; on the Here & Now of curatorial practice; on the method of theory fiction & weird fiction; and on gender, technology & xenofeminism. Our seminars will feature instruction by Jason Adams (Michigan), Levi R. Bryant (Texas), Lucca Fraser (Nova Scotia), Helen Hester (England), Amy Ireland (Australia), Mohammad Salemy (New York), Peter Wolfendale (England), Ben Woodard (Arizona), and Tony Yanick (Scotland). 

The New Centre’s inaugural season is starting with a ninety-day membership drive which will enable us to begin offering affordable graduate-level seminars, provide access to our archived materials, and plan our summer school. Sign up as a Member: [http://thenewcentre.org/membership/member/] or a Friend of The New Centre: [http://thenewcentre.org/membership/friends-of-the-new-centre/] and support the creation of a unique educational institution.
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