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Christine Paluch
Attended Bradley University
Lives in Washington, DC
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Christine Paluch

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Great article about how DC is being changed by technology, and embracing density and car free living. It is part of the reason I love my city. 
Apps don't just affect how we transport things and people. They shape where we choose to live, work, and play.
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politics aside... it's a great city... if i could afford to live close in, i would be there.
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Christine Paluch

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This is a little project I have been helping out on that is now a kickstarter.  Please back it!   https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/202608272/nos-magazine
Sara Luterman is raising funds for NOS Magazine on Kickstarter! NOS Magazine is a news and commentary source for thought and analysis about neurodiversity culture and representation.
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Christine Paluch

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Car Free A to Z: Taking Commuting Maps to the Next Level
This is an amazing mapping application by a DC area company. It basically offers comparison and analytics for multi-modal transportation options in your area. It meshes some of the ideas of Walk Score with the while going deeper into the data than Google Maps does for directions. I have to credit the site, it is absolutely fantastic. It is taking mapping to the next level entirely, and something like this is long overdue since many people struggle with the economic abstracts involved in transportation when finding a location to live. (To note, this states my best option is Transit, which is indeed what I take to work since I live in DC and do not own my own vehicle.) 
Plan your commute, compare your transportation options, and find the most carbon effective, healthy, and cheapest way to travel.
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Christine Paluch

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To all my friends in Baltimore, as well as any other, I hope for your safety. My heart is with you tonight. 
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Thanks +Christine Paluch 
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Oil firm invested billions of pounds in clean and low-carbon energy in the 80s and 90s but later abandoned meaningful efforts to move away from fossil fuels and locked away the research
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Now that oil has crashed, maybe they'll dig-up some of those projects.
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This is a fun map if you are interested in labor economics, and the geographic distribution of employment.
Proximity to employment can influence a range of economic and social outcomes, from local fiscal health to the employment prospects of residents, particularly low-income and minority workers. This analysis of private-sector employment and demographic data at the census tract level reveals the importance of understanding how regional economic and demographic trends intersect at the local level to shape access to employment opportunities, particula...
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I've always been curious about this. Thanks for sharing!
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Christine Paluch

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The google plus is dead meme has been around slightly after it launched several years ago, yet here it is, still around and still not dead. I can usually gauge the incompetence of those in the tech press by whether or not they push the meme. Those who push the meme, just flout their incompetence. 
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+Woozle Hypertwin Depends on whether or not you're the corpse.
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Finally, a Maker Faire in DC everybody is invited too. It's also completely free! The National Maker Faire!  http://nationalmakerfaire.com/
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Marvel Did Not Invent The Cinematic Universe...Star Trek Did
When talking about the Marvel Cinematic Universe one can talk about how both the movies and TV shows tie together into a common shared universe. We think this is a unique concept, but the reality is the concept existed before marvel. 

Star Trek invented the concept. Everything in the Star Trek is coming from the place of a common universe. While the timeline is a bit convoluted now with the two latest trek films, before then it was rather clear common timeline for several years.

This is the thing, the original series lead to films, but were the same characters (and actors). They were on a common timeline, that lead to the Next Generation which took place in the shared universe. Even when the next gen trek films were going on they made it clear that they exist in the same universe as Voyager and Deep Space 9. Every event in trek happened in a Universe that was shared through multiple movies and TV shows. 

Star Trek never rode this to box office dominance the same way as Marvel, but it did lead to a much richer universe that lead to a strong fanbase invested in the series. 

Marvel took a concept invented by Star Trek, and expanded it to great success. The model itself though of the cinematic universe, was one that Star Trek laid the groundwork for. When we are thinking that in the future Marvel could possibly have 9 TV/Netflix shows in addition to the several films sharing a common universe, think to yourself, Star Trek did it first. It is Trek "invention" that many of us do not think of, but should in light of the MCU. 
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http://m.memegenerator.net/instance/37520743

Pretty sure there were some cave drawings that were set in the same cinematic universe... ;)


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The Inaccuracy of DC Neighborhood Data on Walkscore: The Takoma Disappearance

I happen to live in a very well established neighborhood in DC called Takoma. It borders Takoma Park, and the Walter Reed medical center. It is actually a historic neighborhood, even though it's boundaries expanded somewhat over time. But the boundaries of Takomaa have been fairly well settled for some time. It should be noted because of it's history as part of the highway revolt, the Takoma neighborhood of DC, along with Takoma Park, is frequently cited in academic literature. In fact the neighborhood was recently mentioned in Benjamin Ross's Dead End. 

Because of a recent update the neighborhood has all but disappeared from the list of DC neighborhoods. The Walkscore for the neighborhood is gone, and the residences in the neighborhood have lost the neighborhood designation on the site. It should be noted Walkscore previously had very accurate data for DC in terms of neighborhood boundaries and the neighborhood list as recent as a few weeks ago. 

The neighborhood used to have a clear designation on walk score a few weeks ago, including the relevant data for the neighborhood such as the neighborhood walk score, which I have memorized, it was 84. 

The one thing about the importance of accuracy of the neighborhood list for walk score is the fact that walk score data is frequently cited by those who do research into urban planning. If the walk score data is not accurate, and if that neighborhood is correctly listed in walk score, it can create problems when doing research on a specific neighborhood. This is important for doing analysis on things such as walk sheds around public transit, schools, and other resources. This is why the current issues with walk score's data in DC is deeply problematic. If it basically eliminates well established neighborhood boundaries and replaces it with a generic score for a city, the people trying to analyze certian neighborhoods are often doing so with inaccurate data. This is what is currently the case with DC. In fact all that Walk Score would need to do to improve accuracy is go back to the older neighborhood list and boundaries for DC that they used previous to this update. Because while neighborhood boundaries do change over time, the ones they used previously were far more accurate. It also didn't exclude well established historic neighborhoods such as Takoma.


It should also be noted Riggs Park is also missing from their DC neighborhood list. This happens to be the neighborhood of DC's Mayor Muriel Bowser. 

+Walk Score 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Takoma,_Washington,_D.C.
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NB: s/it's/its/
(delete this comment)
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Car Reliance, the Suburbs, and the (sometimes) Middle Class
This is a great piece by the Atlantic's Citylab, because it digs down into something I have been aware of for some time. Car reliant suburbs have a major impact on the finances of the middle class, as an increased percentage of income goes to their vehicle. 

The way I like to explain this is the economic irrationality of the middle class. They consider when purchasing a house the cost of the mortgage and taxes, but struggle quantifying costs beyond things involving those house costs. Externalities are basically an abstraction when deciding to buy a home. This could for example mean the cost of heating a larger house, but in some cases the largest is transportation. Here is the biggest thing, car dependency does not come with predictable costs. The price of gas could vary significantly from year to year, insurance and maintenance as well are not easily pinned down either as they are circumstantial. There might be a range, but it is usually not calculated. Yes, car payments may be predictable, but everything else is basically a form of chaos. Here is the thing, the more vehicle miles traveled, the more likely these externalities can present an issue. This creates a sensitivity standard based on miles traveled of middle class suburban and exurban home owners, which is exclusive to this group which are car dependent. 

For people like myself, who live in the city, especially a city like DC with decent public transit, these calculations are actually easier. Public transit has close to a normal inflationary curve. Even though the cost of transportation does impact things like food costs, overall, the externalities are not nearly as deep. There is a certain level of price insensitivity living in an urban setting. If one can stabilize housing costs through buying a home, those housing costs are usually fairly predictable. 

Which gets me to the great recession, one of the triggers for the great recession, not the only one, was a spike in fuel costs. The great recession originated not in the transit friendly cities, but in defaults in the suburbs and exurbs of America. The reason why is because people had to choose between paying their mortgage, or paying to get to work. While they may not have been overextended with lower fuel prices, they were when fuel prices went up. The price sensitivity for every extra mile traveled for the middle class began to take it's toll. Somebody who was middle class was suddenly at the edge of poverty, based on transportation costs with no viable alternative. In fact one of the smartest economic moves during the recession may have been the cash for clunkers program, as it may have freed up fuel costs for recovery, and reduced the sensitivity somewhat with more efficient and reliable cars. However, even with this program, the sensitivity was still present, largely based on living circumstances.

Here may be the truth of those buying homes in cities with good walkability and public transit, they may have a better idea of the externalities of suburban, and especially exurban living. Knowing that in the long run, cost of transportation with vehicles is not predictable, and the more one has to drive, the less they are in control of their economic future. 

+CityLab 
New data on transportation spending paints an alarming picture.
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Really good points. I know my experience living here in the SF Bay area may not be universal.
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It's satire, but with all good satire, there is quite a bit of truth to it. 
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It may have been intended as satire, but it understates the problem.  I have a neighbor, a REPUBLICAN neighbor, who for nearly half a century kept his green lawn shaded with old growth trees.  In the past three years, he clearcut his lawn to protect his house from falling trees (a smallish tree knocked over in the Derecho damaged his roof a little).  Now, guess what, he's having trouble keeping his lawn green.  Wholesale denial.
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Work
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Analyst
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Statistics, Quality Assurance, Technical and Science Communication, Economic and Policy Analysis, Demographic Analysis
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Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Washington, DC
Previously
Chicago, IL - South Royalton, VT - Peoria, IL - Arlington, VA
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Policy and Technology, I love thee.
Introduction

In a past life I was a professional research and policy analyst.  I worked primarily on science (environmental) and labor policy, but I have also worked on everything from civil rights/liberties to healthcare issues.  Somehow I was roped in by technologists and they have assimilated me into their development processes.
 
I spend my free time (what little there is) making music and tinkering with music technology.  I have a specific interest in sound design and synthesis using shLISP, MAX, PureData, and Reaktor. Currently most of my focus is on shLISP though, which is mildly esoteric programming language for something called a Shnth, which is a small palm top musical computer/instrument. I also enjoy making electronic instruments when I get the chance, specifically modular synthesizers. 



Do you like my posts? I like to collect dogecoins. Very crypto. Wow.   
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  • Vermont Law School
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It is really hard not to love Pyramid Atlantic. It is an awesome local resource, whether you are a visual artist, or a fan of experimental music (Sonic Circuits has shows here). The venue has classes, seminars, etc. The more time I spend at the place, the more I love it.
Public - 4 months ago
reviewed 4 months ago
This place is very local for me, and I go here quite often. The reason I am taking off one star is because service on some nights can be hit and miss, and I find their tables a bit cramped on the main level. With that being said much of the food they serve here is pub food that I am partial about. The pulled pork nachos are a particular favorite, as it is a sweeter alternative to nacho far. I also particularly like the ribs they serve which are very reminsnat of what is typically served in Chicago. St. Louis style sauce, and fall of the bone tender. I have actually had other things on the menu, and I have yet to be disappointed with the food. If you stick to pub fare you will be good, but if you vere into other things you may be disappointed.
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Public - 5 months ago
reviewed 5 months ago
There can be many things written about this resturant, but one thing to me has stood out. How fantastic the ramen is. More specifically the Ramen broth. The DC area in general loves it's noodles, Pho is pretty much a regional dish at this point, and one of our better known resturants is a Ramen bar. Sushi Jin's Ramen, from what I have experienced, is right there alongside the best. There is a good variety of Ramen dishes, and every one is delicious.
Public - 8 months ago
reviewed 8 months ago
This is probably my favorite place to get pho in Silver Spring. It has a larger menu than most Vietnamese restaurants, and most of it is good. While it is not the best pho in the region, that is few places in Virginia, it is up there. The decor on the inside is not the best, it is not upscale by any means. But like most great family restaurants, the family owns and runs it. Pretty much the entire family is around the restaurant. They are very friendly.
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
41 reviews
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This is not the best BBQ I have ever had. But I really do like the place for it's general atmosphere, and the BBQ is good, mostly of the St. Louis variety. The ribs are quite delicious and tender, and the sandwiches and burgers are quite good.
Public - 5 months ago
reviewed 5 months ago
This is a simply awesome music store. Great music stores are hard to find, between the presentation of their instruments and their used guitar inventory, it was an amazing experience. It helps their owners who run the shop are extremely friendly. I ended up buying a vintage guitar here, it is hard not to support a store like this.
Public - 9 months ago
reviewed 9 months ago
This was a beautiful restaurant experience. I went in on Wednesday, which they admit is one of their slower days. The restaurant has recently switched to a multi-course meal approach, but the dishes are inventive, and most importantly delicious. The scallops were probably the best I have ever had. The duck pastrami was also wonderful. The mushroom and caramelized endive dishes were delicious and inventive vegetable dishes. The desert, was both rich and sweet, but also perfect end to a wonderful meal. Every dish was beautifully presented, they were works of art in their own right. The service was exceptional and friendly. Taking this place is within walking distance from my house I will be going back eventually. I cannot praise how on top of things they were. Not that there was anything wrong. For a restaurant that has been around for 8+ years they have everything down to near perfection. This is a hidden treat near the border of Silver Spring and DC, and well worth checking out. The only nit, and it's a minor one, is some of their booths need the seats repaired. Otherwise the interior was beautiful, colorful, and funky.
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Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago