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Christine Paluch
Attended Bradley University
Lives in Washington, DC
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Christine Paluch

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Babymetal is touring the US in 2016, and yes, I indeed did get tickets when they play walking distance from my house at the Fillmore in Silver Spring, MD.

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Not surprised the pre-sale sold out. 
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Always good to see my name and music mentioned.

Noise along the Potomac- Experimental Music in the Washington D.C. Area
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Moog let me into their Asheville, NC factory and Sound Lab to review the Mother-32 semi-modular synthesizer. It is a beautiful instrument. 
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The Player Piano Economy: The Upper Middle Class has Not Decoupled From Income vs Productivity the Same Way as the Middle Class
There is this long standing suspicion I have had about the top quintile of American income earners, which is known as the upper-middle class. People love to show the decoupling of median income from the productivity. You may have seen this chart before: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Productivity_and_Real_Median_Family_Income_Growth_1947-2009.png

But one of the things I have long suspected is that productivity increases have not come necessarily from the median American worker, but from the productivity gains of highly skilled workers. Essentially, the upper middle class, a group that includes everything from engineers, lawyers, doctors, analysts, and managers. What if the relationship with productivity was more complex, and that the productivity was not being disconnected from where the gains were actually being made. This is why you never compare median, to an average. 

So then we come to the top quintile chart. Suddenly that productivity chart does not seem decoupled, as the trend line seems to match up very closely. 

Here is something that is fairly well known, worker productivity is not even across labor groups, an engineer is often far more productive than a store clerk. This is not from a fact the store clerk works less, and the engineer works harder. Far from it, it is because the engineer works smarter. What often happens is the engineer solves a problem that reduces time spent within an organization on a macro level, thus where the productivity increase. Likewise those working with technology may find themselves benefiting from reduced time to do their work, and the need for fewer support employees. These all yield in productivity gains. A lawyer without the need for several paralegals and legal secretaries because of a smart phone, email and machine learning algorithms searching cases, is going to be far more productive from raw economic terms. This is the difference between either making technology that increases productivity, or working with said technology, but not being displaced by it. Thus why you get productivity/revenue numbers for many tech companies that can be as high as $1 million to 1 worker per year in companies like Facebook or Google. Where your average clerk may have a much lower rate, from what we know the typical worker is $100k to 1, or in many cases less. http://www.businessinsider.com/facebook-has-high-revenue-per-employee-2013-3

In the past this gap may have been far smaller, but in the current state, this gap is widening. The more highly skilled the more productive, likewise there incomes have not decoupled to the same extent.

Thus...we have the upper-middle class, while not gaining as much as the top 1%, not decoupled from productivity gains. Because they may be at the source of the productivity gains to begin with, because this is the group of workers who benefited from technological changes. 

This is why the original chart is a bit of an illusion, medians are not always helpful, and looking at things from a more granular perspective often provides a great deal more insight. One has to understand where the productivity gains have come from, and what the nature of them actually are. Productivity growth in the US has largely been because of the adoption or development of technology that increased the productivity of the upper-middle class, yet in many cases displaced support staff. Likewise the middle class has not seen the same increases in productivity. In fact many may have found themselves displaced by it in the labor market. Not everybody benefits in the same way, nor do simplistic charts ever really tell the whole story.

The decoupling for the median, may very well be the result of the fact that productivity increases may be decoupled from the middle class itself, and we are seeing a restructured economy based upon skill and education. 

+CityLab 
Income inequality isn’t just about the 1 percent—wealth is increasing for the next 19 percent, too.
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+John Jainschigg I have covered the class pairing aspect before pretty extensively, and it is indeed a factor, along with inter-generational knowledge transfers. There is not just one data source for this sort of thing, but a myriad of factors to consider when doing this type of analysis. Another aspect is capstoning  within the upper-middle class which is delaying childrearing until ones thirties, if one has children at all (this group is less likely too). 
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I normally do not agree with financial institutions, but in this case I completely agree with financial institution. The depth of this recession will vary by country, and some may be untouched, but there will be a China triggered recession in the next year or two as they decline.
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It's no longer just environmental scientists and insurance actuaries, now major food companies are raising the alarm bells on this problem. This is the one thing I have written about extensively, the increased probability of global food crisis caused by issues in food productions globally. I have to credit General Mills with being up front about this. People need to know just how deep these impacts will be. 
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I have no doubt this is true, to a point, part of the problem can be mitigated by decreasing food waste.  When last I checked, it was estimated that 70 billion pounds of food is wasted in the united states every year.  I am assuming this refers to foods which got at least as far as the supermarket or restaurant before being wasted, but it might also have to do with fruits and vegetables discarded before they went to market because they didn't measure up to some arbitrary standard of what they should look like.
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The Bursting of the China Bubble was Predicted Years Ago
I don't think people realize the depth of the problems in China. It is not just their stock market, there is a much bigger problem in their housing and commercial real estate market. The problems in China may be so deep, that in many ways it makes the US great recession seem small in comparison. 

Many of us saw the issues years ago. This is a story from 2013, but even before then, the problems were obvious. The over-investment in real estate was grand in scale. Many local governments were deep in debt, in fact the debt is in the trillions of dollars. It makes the debt problems in the US and Europe seem minor in comparison.

The question will be the political implications from this point on, but also where else in the world where the fall out from the Chinese bubble will be felt. There are many countries with close relationships to China, where problems can have reverberations, especially in the developing world. 

Some people are predicting a Chinese recession, I think this it may very well be worse, this could very well be an extended depression. The question is how the Chinese government can weather the economic storm. 

How will this effect the US, the reality is this may actually be a positive. With confidence shook in the China, it may make the more transparent and mature US economy look good in comparison. While there may be impacts in the US on Wall Street, some of the reforms from the great recession may serve as a sea wall for the storm of the Chinese recession. The US economy may very well be more rational. 
China's economy has become the second largest in the world, but its rapid growth may have created the largest housing bubble in history
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I think many people have ignored the reality that China is still basically a third world country, with low per-capita GDP, a billion people still living in crushing poverty, a medical "system" that still relies on dried lizards and tiger tails to cure illness, and where infanticide is still not uncommonly practiced. It's a third world country that suddenly fell on a huge pile of cash and had no structures in place to manage all that cash.
The sad reality is that with the global changes in manufacturing technology, a majority in China (and India, and others), may never get another chance to climb up to the middle class. They may have simply started too late.
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Christine Paluch

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A recent performance I did, in it's entirety. The video is lo-fi, but the sounds are fifties/sixties sci-fi meets free improvisation. 
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For those that did not catch my late night post, here is my review of +Moog Music Inc Mother-32 synthesizer. 
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Just to note to people this is the third hurricane in 5 years for the mid-atlantic. This is exactly the type of thing global warming causes. Increase frequency of extreme weather events. I should note, the projections may be conservative, as this storm is already exceeding them. It was not supposed to hit category 3 until saturday earlier in the day. The National Hurricane Center said there are "no limiting factors" for this hurricane to increase in intensity. So excuse me while I freak out.

Just to note for everybody concerned. 1. I am on high ground. 2. I live in an all brick row house. 3. DC is inland enough to soften the blow of a hurricane. 

With all that being said. I DO have friends in Virginia Beach, and it seems like Isabel that is where it is most likely to hit first. I saw the damage Sandy did, and in terms of hurricane intensity, it was not nearly as significant as this, it was just a very big storm.

Also important to note, the part which is being left of the news is the fact a very large storm system basically parked itself on the east coast independent of the hurricane. This has ALREADY caused significant flooding and storm damage in many places, and the east coast right now is pretty saturated in rain which increases the risks with a major storm like Hurricane Joaquin. 

I would like to say I am not worried about this storm. That would be a lie. I saw friends lose their homes and businesses to Sandy a few years ago in NYC/NJ, and this is looking like the potential to be a much worse storm. 

#hurricanejoaquin
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Just caught your comment about "inland enough to soften the blow of a hurricane". Sorry, but even though they are slowed down by landfall, that just means they sit and rain on you all the longer, leading to a greater risk of flooding, even if the winds may drop under 70 mph.
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Go ahead. Shake and stomp.
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My friend Luke Stewart, and DC Jazz Veteran Aaron Martin had their instruments stolen. Like helps run Union Arts in DC, and I have had shows with him. He is a great guy, and needless to say, a great musician. It would be greatly appreciated the help them out, especially if you live in the DC area. https://www.gofundme.com/g82jzp4c/
The Date: Sunday, August 9 The Time: Sometime around 11pm The Incident: Two instruments stolen. One Fender P-Bass Special, belonging to Luke Stewart photo by Rebecca Hope One 1941 Buescher "Big B" Alto Saxophone, serial number #295553, belonging to Aaron Martin photo by LA Randall Hi folks,...
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In her circles
752 people
Have her in circles
16,805 people
Ben Burns's profile photo
Fréderick Huet's profile photo
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Michael Wallace's profile photo
iLam Jr.'s profile photo
Denise Lawson's profile photo
Leon Chevalier's profile photo
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Work
Occupation
Analyst
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Statistics, Quality Assurance, Technical and Science Communication, Economic and Policy Analysis, Demographic Analysis
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Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Washington, DC
Previously
Chicago, IL - South Royalton, VT - Peoria, IL - Arlington, VA
Story
Tagline
Policy and Technology, I love thee.
Introduction

In a past life I was a professional research and policy analyst.  I worked primarily on science (environmental) and labor policy, but I have also worked on everything from civil rights/liberties to healthcare issues.  Somehow I was roped in by technologists and they have assimilated me into their development processes.
 
I spend my free time (what little there is) making music and tinkering with music technology.  I have a specific interest in sound design and synthesis using shLISP, MAX, PureData, and Reaktor. Currently most of my focus is on shLISP though, which is mildly esoteric programming language for something called a Shnth, which is a small palm top musical computer/instrument. I also enjoy making electronic instruments when I get the chance, specifically modular synthesizers. 



Do you like my posts? I like to collect dogecoins. Very crypto. Wow.   
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  • Vermont Law School
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This shop is pretty straight forward, they serve three things, Falafel, fries, and vegan brownies. Not one of these things is bad. The Falafel and fries are probably the best you will find in DC. The toppings for the falafel are numerous. As much as people say Ben's Chili Bowl is DC's institution, I would argue this place is just as much. Both have begun to spread beyond their original locations. The food is of course vegan/vegetarian friendly, in fact there is no meat at all. I am not vegan or vegetarian, but I love this place to death, it is easily the best cheap eat in DC, if not one of the beast eats period.
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Public - 9 months ago
reviewed 9 months ago
Thai Food places when they are good get some very simple things just right. One being tofu Pad Thai. For the Pad Thai at Kin Da, the sauce had great balance, and the texture of the tofu was nearly perfect, light and fluffy, but also filling. Never mind the generous portion which is provided with the meal. The ginger beef my partner had was also excellent. The prices are as reasonable as they come for Thai food in DC. Most importantly the service staff was attentive. I cannot comment on their sushi, but so far this place is a win for Takoma Park. Reasonably priced good thai food, with great service. My local Thai place, just happens to be one of the better ones in the DC area.
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Public - 10 months ago
reviewed 10 months ago
This place is very local for me, and I go here quite often. The reason I am taking off one star is because service on some nights can be hit and miss, and I find their tables a bit cramped on the main level. With that being said much of the food they serve here is pub food that I am partial about. The pulled pork nachos are a particular favorite, as it is a sweeter alternative to nacho far. I also particularly like the ribs they serve which are very reminsnat of what is typically served in Chicago. St. Louis style sauce, and fall of the bone tender. I have actually had other things on the menu, and I have yet to be disappointed with the food. If you stick to pub fare you will be good, but if you vere into other things you may be disappointed.
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Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
There can be many things written about this resturant, but one thing to me has stood out. How fantastic the ramen is. More specifically the Ramen broth. The DC area in general loves it's noodles, Pho is pretty much a regional dish at this point, and one of our better known resturants is a Ramen bar. Sushi Jin's Ramen, from what I have experienced, is right there alongside the best. There is a good variety of Ramen dishes, and every one is delicious.
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
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It is really hard not to love Pyramid Atlantic. It is an awesome local resource, whether you are a visual artist, or a fan of experimental music (Sonic Circuits has shows here). The venue has classes, seminars, etc. The more time I spend at the place, the more I love it.
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
This is not the best BBQ I have ever had. But I really do like the place for it's general atmosphere, and the BBQ is good, mostly of the St. Louis variety. The ribs are quite delicious and tender, and the sandwiches and burgers are quite good.
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
This is a simply awesome music store. Great music stores are hard to find, between the presentation of their instruments and their used guitar inventory, it was an amazing experience. It helps their owners who run the shop are extremely friendly. I ended up buying a vintage guitar here, it is hard not to support a store like this.
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago