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Christine Paluch
Attended Bradley University
Lives in Washington, DC
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Christine Paluch

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I previously posted about how climate change can cause famine. The one thing that has been known to ferment political instability is food and food prices. This can lead to war, and it is good to see the US military to look past politics and realize the very real problems that arise from such challenges. 
I think slate is doing a great job with this story, the human side of environmental issues are not as deeply explored as they should be. The reality of global warming is the effects on humanity are significant. We need to be talking less about polar bears, and more about the impacts on human populations. Because when it gets down to it the sociological and economic impacts from environmental problems are significant, and far to often do not get the proper attention. 
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I need to find the computer models used/ran by the US and Canadian governments I used to decide on where to move to 9 years ago. They projected how the climate was going to change in North America based on Climate Change for the next 100 years. If I live long enough, I'll see where I am living turn into a Pine Forest. Or at least become capable of supporting such a forest.
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Christine Paluch

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John Cheese's Laudible Effort of Illustrating Poverty in America Through Comedy
On the issue of income inequality and lack of income mobility, as much as social scientists, policy researchers, and economists write about it there is something eternally helpful of having somebody like John Cheese from cracked writing about the realities of the labor market in much of America. We are often writing from positions of relative privilege, we know what is happening through data, research, and case studies, but in many ways we are not availed of the circumstances. Hopefully, this series will get the recognition it deserves. 

As much as John Cheese is a comedy writer, these short peices from cracked have put him a bit on the journalistic cutting edge. To many people removed from this reality, they serve to show just how bad things really are. 
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That was a nice summary. I know a lot of people don't understand the dynamics of that.

And what bugs me a lot is that the military takes advantage of this. Not that there's anything wrong with enlisting if that's the path you want. But for kids who have no other options and get shipped to the front lines, and then come home broken, it's really troubling.
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Christine Paluch

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Needless to say I want this cleanup, and it upsets me that states that are not part Chesapeake Bay watershed stay out of this. Those of us who live in this region want this cleaned up, and I don't want some anti-regulatory conservative red-stater involved in blocking environmental regulation in my region. 
Once evocative of blue crabs and boating, in recent years the Chesapeake Bay has become known for its pollution. So why are a group of outside states trying to block the long-awaited cleanup plan?
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Say ALEC twenty times fast... 
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Christine Paluch

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Never confuse a technical resource with the actual "code". 
In a perfect world, there would be no need to have an argument over how long a book is. You would think it should be a pretty objective inquiry. But not for the tax code, a book whose length has been hyper-inflated by journalists and others as a proxy for...
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"Why do environmental pollutants accumulate in the cold polar regions? This may not only be due to the fact that many substances are less volatile at low temperatures, as has been long suspected, but also to their extremely slow natural degradation. Although persistent environmental pollutants have been and continue to be released worldwide, the Arctic and Antarctic regions are significantly more contaminated than elsewhere. The marine animals living there have some of the highest levels of persistent organic pollutant (POP) contamination of any creatures".
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This is a pretty solid article on climate change and the future of global food crisis. This is why I often say why environmental policy and economics is probably the most dismal science of all. 

The one solution he is not mentioning as a possible solution, which is reducing birthrates to below the replacement rate globally through education, and reproductive healthcare for women. The reality is conservative religious politics and culture which controls many countries throughout the developing world does have fault in this, and we do need to be upfront about it. Encouraging both high birthrates and the opression of women in regions dependent on food importation will only lead to famine. As much as the green revolution and food aid may have helped, we need to progress human culture as well. 

Indeed better distribution systems and stemming global warming will help, but they cannot be the only solutions. In fact the former solution will be less likely, as food producers will always feed there own people before distributing globally, and having an expectation otherwise is unrealistic. Without social development to stablize populations at or below the replacement rate, famine is going to be inevitable. I will be blunt, religion and culture are part of the problem. While I understand the call to respect people's culture, it should be noted that sometimes a culture can in fact inflict self harm. Respect should be given with being direct as well with regards to the harmful aspects, if you do not socially modernize you are going to put your own people in peril, and as food production becomes more scarce, famine becomes more likely. The way to avoid famine, is to socially develop, which means providing women with an education, economic opportunities, and reproductive choice. The demographic-economic paradox has never been so important in sustaining humanity and preventing famine in many parts of the world. 
The history of humanity is a history of hunger. Pretty much every society in recorded time has been wracked by famines, and a few have been destroyed by them. Sometimes these famines are spurred or exacerbated by political or military campaigns. Sometimes they’re due to human error. But the rather...
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+Christine Paluch
 I am glad that you see it this way as well. I got into a conversation about this the other day and had several people calling me a monster and a racist because I pointed out that most of Africa has a birth rate of 5-7 children per fertile woman. Compared to 2.5 or less in developed countries.
The problem is that they are reproducing at too high a rate for their environment to support. When this happens to other animals in nature they starve and the population returns to a manageable level.
I agree that education is the only way to reach them. It is especially important for young girls and women.
The next step is providing birth control that cannot be refused by the male. Condoms while important in Africa due to the HIV epidemic that is going on there are rejected outright by men. So the women need to have another form of birth control as a back up to the condoms. Some of the sub-dermal methods may be best. 
The biggest problem is getting religious groups that have such a large influence in these areas to agree with these programs.
Ironically the continent actually can support its population with the agricultural production it has right now. The regions that produce the excess sell it to foreign markets because the regions of Africa that need it have no way to pay for it.
It never ends.
http://data.worldbank.org/indicator/SP.DYN.TFRT.IN
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This guy may have the lemon to define all lemons. Oh yeah, it's also a very expensive sports car. 
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I am calling shenanigans. Seeing as he is the only one that seems to have had any of these issues I am thinking he is just trying to pull some scam. If indeed  he is having this many issues  I am betting this lies more with the dealer than it does with Porsche itself. Seeing as the stated third party options are dealer installed it makes sense. At the same time it is a big issue here in the States with all car dealers hiring kids strait from school with zero experience. Good luck finding a well trained mechanic in one these days.
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Beautiful! :)
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Christine Paluch

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This is basically spring in DC. 
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Check out the AQI in China, then look-up your own city. http://aqicn.org
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This is probably my favorite of the Oprah memes thus far. 
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In her circles
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Work
Occupation
IT Specialist, Analyst,
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Statistics, Quality Assurance, Technical and Science Communication, Economic and Policy Analysis, Demographic Analysis
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Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
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Washington, DC
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Chicago, IL - South Royalton, VT - Peoria, IL - Arlington, VA
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Policy and Technology, I love thee.
Introduction

In a past life I was a professional research and policy analyst.  I worked primarily on science (environmental) and labor policy, but I have also worked on everything from civil rights/liberties to healthcare issues.  Somehow I was roped in by technologists and they have assimilated me into their development processes.
 
I spend my free time (what little there is) making music and tinkering with music technology.  I have a specific interest in sound design and synthesis using shLISP, MAX, PureData, and Reaktor. Currently most of my focus is on shLISP though, which is mildly esoteric programming language for something called a Shnth, which is a small palm top musical computer/instrument. I also enjoy making electronic instruments when I get the chance, specifically modular synthesizers. 



Do you like my posts? I like to collect dogecoins. Very crypto. Wow.   
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  • Vermont Law School
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This is probably my favorite place to get pho in Silver Spring. It has a larger menu than most Vietnamese restaurants, and most of it is good. While it is not the best pho in the region, that is few places in Virginia, it is up there. The decor on the inside is not the best, it is not upscale by any means. But like most great family restaurants, the family owns and runs it. Pretty much the entire family is around the restaurant. They are very friendly.
Public - a month ago
reviewed a month ago
This was a beautiful restaurant experience. I went in on Wednesday, which they admit is one of their slower days. The restaurant has recently switched to a multi-course meal approach, but the dishes are inventive, and most importantly delicious. The scallops were probably the best I have ever had. The duck pastrami was also wonderful. The mushroom and caramelized endive dishes were delicious and inventive vegetable dishes. The desert, was both rich and sweet, but also perfect end to a wonderful meal. Every dish was beautifully presented, they were works of art in their own right. The service was exceptional and friendly. Taking this place is within walking distance from my house I will be going back eventually. I cannot praise how on top of things they were. Not that there was anything wrong. For a restaurant that has been around for 8+ years they have everything down to near perfection. This is a hidden treat near the border of Silver Spring and DC, and well worth checking out. The only nit, and it's a minor one, is some of their booths need the seats repaired. Otherwise the interior was beautiful, colorful, and funky.
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Public - 2 months ago
reviewed 2 months ago
We went there for restaurant week, and as it has been mentioned the inside has an idealized look to it, like if somebody tried to build a cuban street inside a building. My partner said it was las vegas like in some ways. With that being said the service was top notch, our wait staff was on top of every little thing from the very start. I have no idea where the bad reviews are coming from. The food we ordered was incredible. Every single dish was absolutely delectable whether it was the lamb, or pork belly tapas, or the main dishes. Then there was the desert, which they brought out in a pair, flan and a chocolate torte with an unbelievable ice cream. With all that being said, the cocktails were very good, I would say the coconut mojito was probably the best of the three we had.
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Public - 3 months ago
reviewed 3 months ago
Best Chicago style hotdogs in DC. They actually get it right. I never had a burger here, and there are several burger places in the area. DC has so many good burger joints especially around DuPont circle it is hard to stand out in that regard. But the hot dogs bring me back to my childhood in Chicago.
Food: Very goodDecor: GoodService: Good
Public - 11 months ago
reviewed 11 months ago
36 reviews
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Republic is the new seafood place in Takoma Park, and the area which has a solid habit of supporting local establishments is going a bit crazy over it. It is a needed destination in the Takoma area, a top notch restaurant with solid dishes. The interior though was a little to dark at times, which made it hard to read the menu. When I was there they were still working out some kinks in the restaurant, but the food was good, the oysters were fresh, and the beer selection was solid. I am hoping they expand to a brunch menu soon, as it stands, it is a good place for dinner in the Republic of Takoma Park. Hopefully in a year whatever issues the restaurant has will be worked out, but as it stand it is worth checking out, even if it is to down saw raw oysters with a pint of craft beer.
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Public - 3 months ago
reviewed 3 months ago
They serve wonderful carving board sandwiches with a generous portion of meat. Their turkey is often incredible, and I have never had a bad ham sandwich. I have pretty much had every one at this point.
Food: Very goodDecor: GoodService: Very good
Public - 11 months ago
reviewed 11 months ago
Great food and service. A whole in the wall local seafood and bbq place...but a very good.
Food: Very goodDecor: GoodService: Excellent
Public - 11 months ago
reviewed 11 months ago