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Rhiann Johns
Attended University of Glamorgan
Lives in Pontypridd
13 followers|4,996 views
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The benefits of social media for the #spoonie  community #chronicallyawesome
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Acceptance of a #chronicillness  does not have to be about giving up but instead to live a full life after diagnosis  
#spoonie   #chronicallyawesome  
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Rhiann Johns

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Loved this video and really identified with it as I am struggling with isolation at the moment.  I am not on my own all day but being alone for hours when symptoms are bad can be difficult.  
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+Jenni Prokopy That's a really difficult one; I hate asking anyone for help and as a result I cannot let people in when I am isolated and lonely.  When I had a fall down the stairs two weeks ago even though it was a shock and took me ages to be able to move and crawl to a chair, but my stubborness still held me back from contacting members of my family or friends nearby.  That's why I love social media, like Facebook and Twitter and through them being able to connect with others going through similar situations and conditions to myself; it's a fantastic massive support network and really helps with isolation, like being stuck in bed.  Hugging pets, like my gorgeous dog Honey also helps with isolation.  And generally keeping busy also helps by taking my mind off how lonely I am and stops me from counting down the hours until someone is home.  Hugs back! Take care of yourself xxx
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Find out more about 'The Pillow Fort' Magazine in which helps make #chronicillnes  suck less!! 

http://t.co/9gY3sgiDps
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What do we do when we #spoonies take medications which are not entirely effective or live with conditions which are untreatable?

Well why don't we all take our own prescription pads and prescribe ourselves little treats to get us out of the black hole that #chronicillness causes and distracting ourselves from unpleasant symptoms 
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Have her in circles
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We shouldn't judge others purely on what we can see...many wounds and scars are invisible #spoonie   #chronicillness   #chronicallyawesome  
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How #chronicillness  can change a person and about the power of acceptance #chronicallyawesome   #spoonie  
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Rhiann Johns

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Approximately 15 million people live with a long-term condition in England. Of these conditions, stroke is the largest cause of disability, affecting more than 900,000 people in England, half of which are left dependent on others. Every Year approximately 157,000 people experience a stroke – 25% of them are under retirement age and several hundred are under 16.

The World Health Organization (WHO) defines stroke as “the clinical syndrome of rapid onset of focal or global cerebral deficit, lasting more than 24 hours, or leading to death, with no apparent cause other than a vascular one”. 

Around 15 per cent of strokes are haemorrhagic strokes, due to bleeding in or around the brain. However, the most common type of stroke is an ischaemic stroke which results from an interruption in the blood supply to the brain caused by a clot narrowing or blocking a cerebral blood vessel depriving cells of oxygenated blood, causing damage to brain tissue. Thrombolysis, a 'clot-busting' drug, may be used to treat an ischaemic stroke if specific criteria can be met. 

The effects of a stroke depend on which part of the brain is injured and how severely it is affected. Quick access to emergency medical treatment can help reduce the damage to a person’s brain and improve their chances of a full recovery. A delay in getting help can result in death or long-term disabilities. The process of recovery begins within hours as ischaemia and cerebral oedema begin to resolve. Neural plasticity allows neurons take on new functions and new skills may be acquired through training and physiotherapy and occupational therapy input. 

You can recognise the symptoms of a stroke using the FAST test:

FACIAL weakness: Can the person smile? Has their mouth or eye drooped?

ARM weakness: Can the person raise both arms?

SPEECH problems: Can the person speak clearly and understand what you say?

TIME to call 999.

If a person fails any one of these tests, immediately dial 999 for help. Your quick response can help reduce the damage to a person’s brain and improve their chances of a full recovery.


Claire had a stroke at the age of 19, and was told twice that she may not make it through the night. Three years on and she’s rebuilding her life; studying and working towards a career, campaigning for Stroke Association and using her experience to support others. See Claire’s story at www.NeuroNula.co.uk and check out her own website: www.hopeforstrokesurviving.com 

For information and support visit:

Stroke Association www.stroke.org.uk 
+Stroke Association NI 
Stroke Association provide support for stroke survivors to make the best recovery they can; campaign for better stroke prevention and care; and fund research to develop new treatments and ways of preventing stroke.

Different Strokes www.differentstrokes.co.uk
Different Strokes provides a unique, free service to younger stroke survivors throughout the United Kingdom focusing on the specific and complex needs of the younger and the more active stroke survivor.
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Rhiann Johns

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New Blog Post: 'A life changed through illness...' 
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People
Have her in circles
13 people
Pamela Sloate's profile photo
Anya de Iongh's profile photo
Rachel Coates's profile photo
Education
  • University of Glamorgan
    BSc Psychology, 2005 - 2008
Basic Information
Gender
Female
Story
Tagline
A girl with a neurological condition trying to live her life as best she can and figuring out the next step!!
Introduction
Rhiann from the blog 'My Brain Lesion and Me'.  I suffer with a long-standing brain stem lesion and spastic paraparesis.  Living life with constant dizziness with frequent episodes of vertigo and visual disturbances. Also a lot of falls happen in my daily life with legs giving way frequently.

Apart from that, I have a BSc Psychology, and have keen interests in Psychology especially the clinical aspects like mental health, and also a keen interest in neurology and neuroscience. 

Also love to read, especially Jodi Picoult, and also love to write especially on my blog and keep a journal.  Also love films and TV, and love to listen to music.
Bragging rights
Have a BSc in Psychology (2:1)
Places
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Currently
Pontypridd