Profile cover photo
Profile photo
Rhiann Johns
20 followers -
A girl with a neurological condition trying to live her life as best she can and figuring out the next step!!
A girl with a neurological condition trying to live her life as best she can and figuring out the next step!!

20 followers
About
Posts

Post has attachment
Rhiann Johns commented on a post on Blogger.
I can relate to appreciating the people closest in your life. My parents are the closest people I have and I don't know what I would do without them. I also struggle with eating the wrong things, often turning to chocolate or sweets during difficult times. I bought the two cookbooks that Fearne Cotton has brought out and tried some of the healthier recipes. None of the recipes have refined sugar so can indulge without the guilt!
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Fed up with ‪#‎Winter‬ already? Already feeling the #Winter blues? Not surprising, especially when dealing with ‪#‎chronicillness‬ as well. But to help beat those blues The Pillow Fort have published their 5th edition of their magazine for those living with #chronicillness...this month's theme is #Winter and as the magazine is positive and uplifting it surely will help bring sunshine on those dark and dreary days.

Click on the link to find out more and purchase...

http://bit.ly/1AMNVO4
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Do you live with #chronicillness?  Are you ready to #thrive  despite it?  Then you need to read the brand new issue of the wonderfully positive and inspiring magazine from The Pillow Fort: 

http://bit.ly/1AMNVO4 
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Support those affected by chronic and persistent dizziness and raise awareness of vestibular disorders by purchasing a t-shirt for 'Balance Awareness Week 2014': 

http://teespring.com/stores/balance-awareness-2014

#dizziness   #spoonie   #chronicillnes  
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
The benefits of social media for the #spoonie  community #chronicallyawesome
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
We shouldn't judge others purely on what we can see...many wounds and scars are invisible #spoonie   #chronicillness   #chronicallyawesome  
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Acceptance of a #chronicillness  does not have to be about giving up but instead to live a full life after diagnosis  
#spoonie   #chronicallyawesome  
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
How #chronicillness  can change a person and about the power of acceptance #chronicallyawesome   #spoonie  
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has shared content
Originally shared by ****
Approximately 15 million people live with a long-term condition in England. Of these conditions, stroke is the largest cause of disability, affecting more than 900,000 people in England, half of which are left dependent on others. Every Year approximately 157,000 people experience a stroke – 25% of them are under retirement age and several hundred are under 16.

The World Health Organization (WHO) defines stroke as “the clinical syndrome of rapid onset of focal or global cerebral deficit, lasting more than 24 hours, or leading to death, with no apparent cause other than a vascular one”. 

Around 15 per cent of strokes are haemorrhagic strokes, due to bleeding in or around the brain. However, the most common type of stroke is an ischaemic stroke which results from an interruption in the blood supply to the brain caused by a clot narrowing or blocking a cerebral blood vessel depriving cells of oxygenated blood, causing damage to brain tissue. Thrombolysis, a 'clot-busting' drug, may be used to treat an ischaemic stroke if specific criteria can be met. 

The effects of a stroke depend on which part of the brain is injured and how severely it is affected. Quick access to emergency medical treatment can help reduce the damage to a person’s brain and improve their chances of a full recovery. A delay in getting help can result in death or long-term disabilities. The process of recovery begins within hours as ischaemia and cerebral oedema begin to resolve. Neural plasticity allows neurons take on new functions and new skills may be acquired through training and physiotherapy and occupational therapy input. 

You can recognise the symptoms of a stroke using the FAST test:

FACIAL weakness: Can the person smile? Has their mouth or eye drooped?

ARM weakness: Can the person raise both arms?

SPEECH problems: Can the person speak clearly and understand what you say?

TIME to call 999.

If a person fails any one of these tests, immediately dial 999 for help. Your quick response can help reduce the damage to a person’s brain and improve their chances of a full recovery.


Claire had a stroke at the age of 19, and was told twice that she may not make it through the night. Three years on and she’s rebuilding her life; studying and working towards a career, campaigning for Stroke Association and using her experience to support others. See Claire’s story at www.NeuroNula.co.uk and check out her own website: www.hopeforstrokesurviving.com 

For information and support visit:

Stroke Association www.stroke.org.uk 
+Stroke Association NI 
Stroke Association provide support for stroke survivors to make the best recovery they can; campaign for better stroke prevention and care; and fund research to develop new treatments and ways of preventing stroke.

Different Strokes www.differentstrokes.co.uk
Different Strokes provides a unique, free service to younger stroke survivors throughout the United Kingdom focusing on the specific and complex needs of the younger and the more active stroke survivor.
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Find out more about 'The Pillow Fort' Magazine in which helps make #chronicillnes  suck less!! 

http://t.co/9gY3sgiDps
Photo
Add a comment...
Wait while more posts are being loaded