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Christopher Simeur
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Christopher Simeur

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On April 24, 1990, the Hubble Space Telescope was launched into orbit.

“No matter what Hubble reveals — planets, dense star fields, colorful interstellar nebulae, deadly black holes, graceful colliding galaxies, the large-scale structure of the Universe — each image establishes your own private vista on the cosmos.” - Neil deGrasse Tyson

#NASA #Penny4NASA #Hubble #Hubble25 #Space  
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Today Space Oddity went over 25 million views. To everyone who helped make it - huge thanks.

http://youtu.be/KaOC9danxNo
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A Giant Texas Katydid (Neobarrettia spinosa) chirping, breathing, and grooming is way more captivating than I expected it might be. Have you ever looked so closely at an insect? I don't mean macrophotography. I'm talking about extremely close-up footage of a bug in motion. Insects respire a lot differently than us.

Like us however, they depend on oxygen to fuel their cellular processes, but instead of breathing through their mouths, they take in air through a series of tiny holes called spiracles. These spiracles are distributed along an insect's exoskeleton, and act as portals to a ramifying network of tiny, internal, fluid-filled tubes called tracheae, which the insect uses in place of lungs. Air enters through the spiracles and diffuses down the tracheae. Oxygen from the atmosphere is delivered to the insect's cells, where it is exchanged for carbon dioxide. CO2 is then emitted back into the atmosphere via the tracheael system, typically through spiracles located toward the rear of the insect.

Video by precarious333:
Neobarrettia spinosa (Giant Texas Katydid) adult male

Texas Entomology: http://texasento.net/Neobarrettia.htm

#science #scienceeveryday #entomology #grooming
#respiration #spiracles #tracheae  
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Just a couple of weeks to go.
The scientist is taking his podcast and bringing it to TV, with the hopes of making the 11 p.m. slot a little more enlightening.
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We're all just complex Roombas.
Episode Audio Download Episode Audio (73.1 MB PDF) Episode Notes and LinksNotes Bestselling author and friend of the podcast Sam Harris joins Tamler and Dave for a marathon podcast. (Seriously, pack two pairs of astronaut diapers for this one). We  talk about the costs and benefits of religion, dropping acid in India, and the illusory nature of (a certain kind of) free will. Then we go at it on blame, moral responsibility, hatred...
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Thank you, Leonard. You have been, and always shall be, our friend. RIP: http://j.mp/1C4QgKb
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Interesting.
 
Conventional wisdom holds that frozen steaks should be thawed before cooking, but we wondered if steaks could be cooked straight from the freezer: http://bit.ly/1sIU1fV
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Cool flame - unexpected discovery up on Space Station that can affect fuel efficiency in cars.

http://www.jacobsschool.ucsd.edu/news/news_releases/release.sfe?id=1548
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Interesting article on AI in general, and the relationship between processing power vs "thinking".
 
The mystery of Go, the 2,500-year-old game that computers still can't win:

http://wrd.cm/1lejxUW
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