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Veris Prasarntree
Attended University of Maryland, College Park
Lived in New York
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Veris Prasarntree

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WARNING: Do not be an on LSD high if you're going to watch this.
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David Will's profile photoVeris Prasarntree's profile photo
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You mean, holy Shatner, that was eye opening.
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Veris Prasarntree

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Are you kidding? Channon and Yelena were brilliant! Brilliant!
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It doesn't matter how badly the government's case falls apart: once convicted, you have to prove your innocence beyond a reasonable doubt.

Isn't that an interesting comic storyline? A cop who knowingly sends someone to death row dies in a car accident and won't be allowed into the afterlife until he's helped falsely convicted people prove their innocence?
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An interesting look at one downside of market-provided education. Of course the FBI was interested in learning more about terrorism and Islamic extremists and naturally any experts they did have were assigned to active investigations.

The problem here isn't only that the FBI has crappy instructors educating them about Islamic extremists. It's that a large industry has evolved of self-styled Islamic extremist "experts" who ply their wares and soak up DHS money intended for law enforcement agencies to train and learn about extremism. And there's no empiricism about these lessons, no rigorous studies, it's just made up nonsense designed to play on fears.
Recently published documents show FBI training materials that depict Islam as an indicator of terrorist activity. Are these materials helping terrorists – and does the government need more meaningful...
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Rick Perry: The government can't do anything right. That is, except for kill people. It can accomplish that without flaw or necessity to review any kind of flaw or mistake.

Really, I can't see how someone could logically be Christian or for small government, and applaud the death penalty.
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Veris Prasarntree

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Just spotted one of Fox News's typical "frame our opinion in the form of a question so we're not technically advocating it" questions, which stated, "Does the president want Ron Paul to win the bid.

Not bad. But let's combine that with others, to really hit him int he foreign policy area where he's lost points with the Republican base. Such as, "Do Zawahiri and Ahmadinejad want Ron Paul to win the Republican nomination?"
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Veris Prasarntree's profile photoJeff Johnston's profile photoGreg Fuller's profile photo
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Cryptonomicon before the Baroque Cycle, of course. But, yes.
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Guess "supporting the troops" only goes so far.
ORLANDO, FL — Here’s something many of the candidates running for the Republican nomination for president can agree on: Booing an active duty soldier serving in Iraq because he’s gay is really not a g...
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Veris Prasarntree's profile photoJeff Johnston's profile photo
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That's different from criticizing some members of the audience for shouting "boo" at the soldier in question. Opposition to a policy doesn't have to be personal.
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Same economic motivations, same reasons to avoid the "legal process." Same attempt at a solution to solve the problem. But let's the same solution another whack. It didn't work then, but I don't see why doing the same thing wouldn't work now.
Everyone knows that America was settled by immigrants. But few realize how much of this settlement was done illegally. Shortly after winning independence, Congress enacted legislation that called for ...
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Stephen Baker's profile photoVeris Prasarntree's profile photo
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Mostly no, but but whole drumbeat of militarizing the border to prevent illegal immigration is pretty dumb unless you want to do a Berlin Wall, only with the guns pointing outward. But in terms of space, resources, and opportunity, we're not that far off. Population density out West, and the only limitation is moving electricity and water. The demand for non-skilled labor in this country cannot be denied.

It's less encouraging illegality than it is a re-understanding of why they do it and what a good response to it is, and why dropping a bunch of National Guard battalions on the border with shoot-to-kill orders won't work.
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Contractors really do have their place, but only as short-term uses. You contract them to build a product for you, or supply you a short-term service that it would otherwise be illogical and costly to keep a full-time person on staff for.

A core function, like an intelligence collector and analyst, is always going to be there and there's no reason to use a contractor to fill that billet. It might save that organization a bit of money, but to the taxpayers, in the long-run, it costs more.

Building a new piece software suite is something for contractors. You don't keep in-house developers because how often do you develop new software? Of course, I have my own beef with how this is currently done within the government.

I imagine this stance will be popular for another 10 years and then the prevailing talk will be, "The government is too large and employs too many people! Shrink it down and let private businesses do it." Even though there's no logic for that in the defense and intelligence community.
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Mick Wilson's profile photoVeris Prasarntree's profile photo
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I didn't; it's interesting.

"16 intelligence agencies urged Congress to remove caps on staffing at intelligence agencies. Because of these federal employee ceilings, the agencies had no choice but to hire contractors as semi-permanent staff, which most likely results in a higher bill for taxpayers."

It's a decision to keep the size of the government "small" or to end its huge mission of fighting terrorism on a global scale. Since we're probably not going to end the latter anytime soon, we're probably going to have to give up the former.

At my former job, my former company was contracted to build a government program out of nothing. Essentially, the client wanted a program immeidately, and it's not as if it keeps a pool of unused employees around to do so. As it didn't (or couldn't) transfer people from other places, or at least in the numbers necessary, it hired contractors. This wasn't going to be a temporary program though; while it made sense to have contractors after the first year or two, it would have been cost-effective to transfer them to being government employees.
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Have him in circles
61 people
Antoinette Palmieri's profile photo
Paul Sullivan's profile photo
Gary Hess's profile photo
Mike Klepzig's profile photo
Antoinette Palmieri's profile photo
Joey Ryan's profile photo
Daniel Baldwin's profile photo
SOMBAT  PRASANTREE's profile photo
Jack Kwait-Blank's profile photo
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New York - Alexandria, VA - Heidelberg
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  • University of Maryland, College Park
    Government and Politics, 1999 - 2003
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