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Ken Wong
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Ken Wong

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Possibly silly question: is a clean flash required for moving from 5.0.2 to 5.1 exodus ROMs?
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Paruyr Amirjanyan's profile photoSteve Brantley (Ferenczy68)'s profile photoClayton Leung's profile photoKen Wong's profile photo
6 comments
 
Do you mean the modem firmware? I'm guessing not, but could be wrong.
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Ken Wong

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Hi guys, I'm seeing blank changelogs for the last two bacon nightlies, something happened on the server?
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Daniele Pressi's profile photoSteve Brantley (Ferenczy68)'s profile photoKen Wong's profile photoMartin Rodemann's profile photo
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Yepp, but currently they are simply blank because we didn't change a think. Tonight nightlies will have a small change in bionic in order to make Nvdia Shield working, that's all. Dave and me are very busy currently, so no time to do a think on 5.0...
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Ken Wong

Bug Reporting (Read FAQs 1st)  - 
 
Hi, I'm not sure that this counts as a bug with the ROM itself, but the last two days' nightlies have had empty changelogs. I've been using the Exodus updater on my OnePlus One (bacon), but I looked in the directories on vanir-exodus.net and this appears to be happening in the other devices' nightlies as well.

Paste from exodus-official_bacon_5.0.2.041315.zip.changelog:
====================
     04-13-2015
====================


====================
     04-12-2015
====================


====================
     04-11-2015
====================


====================
     04-10-2015
====================


====================
     04-09-2015
====================
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Dave Kessler's profile photoMartin Rodemann's profile photo
2 comments
 
This should be fixed now for the next nightly
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Ken Wong

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Amazing place, amazing photo.
 
The Forest’s Awakening || 森の覚醒

There’s nothing better than spending a morning all alone in the Sagano Bamboo Forest near Kyoto, listening to the soft rustling sounds of tall stalks and leaves as the sway gently in the breeze. On a clear morning, the light shines brilliantly though the tangle of beautiful green, making the forest seem as though it’s illuminated from within. It’s a truly extraordinary place to be.  

#kyoto   #japan   #arashiyama   #bamboo  

http://bit.ly/DreamJapan
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Ken Wong

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+Google Drive, why is Google Docs on iOS unable to edit tables in Google documents, but perfectly happy editing tables in Word documents stored in my Google Drive? :-(
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Ken Wong

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Well, I see that people have figured out why I'm quitting AOSP.

There's no point being the maintainer of an Operating System that can't boot to the home screen on its flagship device for lack of GPU support, especially when I'm getting the blame for something that I don't have authority to fix myself and that I had anticipated and escalated more than 6 months ahead.
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Ken Wong

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Discussions about DRM often land on the fundamental problem with DRM: that it doesn't work, or worse, that it is in fact mathematically impossible to make it work. The argument goes as follows:

1. The purpose of DRM is to prevent people from copying content while allowing people to view that content,

2. You can't hide something from someone while showing it to them,

3. And in any case widespread copyright violations (e.g. movies on file sharing sites) often come from sources that aren't encrypted in the first place, e.g. leaks from studios.

It turns out that this argument is fundamentally flawed. Usually the arguments from pro-DRM people are that #2 and #3 are false. But no, those are true. The problem is #1 is false.

The purpose of DRM is not to prevent copyright violations.

The purpose of DRM is to give content providers leverage against creators of playback devices.

Content providers have leverage against content distributors, because distributors can't legally distribute copyrighted content without the permission of the content's creators. But if that was the only leverage content producers had, what would happen is that users would obtain their content from those content distributors, and then use third-party content playback systems to read it, letting them do so in whatever manner they wanted.

Here are some examples:

A. Paramount make a movie. A DVD store buys the rights to distribute this movie from Paramount, and sells DVDs. You buy the DVD, and want to play it. Paramount want you to sit through some ads, so they tell the DVD store to put some ads on the DVD labeled as "unskippable".

Without DRM, you take the DVD and stick it into a DVD player that ignores "unskippable" labels, and jump straight to the movie.

With DRM, there is no licensed player that can do this, because to create the player you need to get permission from Paramount -- or rather, a licensing agent created and supported by content companies, DVD-CCA -- otherwise, you are violating some set of patents, anti-circumvention laws, or both.

B. Columbia make a movie. Netflix buys the rights to distribute this movie from Columbia, and sells access to the bits of the movie to users online. You get a Netflix subscription. Columbia want you to pay more if you want to watch it simultaneously on your TV and your phone, so they require that Netflix prevent you from doing this.

Now. You are watching the movie upstairs with your family, and you hear your cat meowing at the door downstairs.

Without DRM, you don't have to use Netflix's software, so maybe just pass the feed to some multiplexing software, which means that you can just pick up your phone, tell it to stream the same movie, continue watching it while you walk downstairs to open the door for the cat, come back upstairs, and turn your phone off, and nobody else has been inconvenienced and you haven't missed anything.

With DRM, you have to use Netflix's software, so you have to play by their rules. There is no licensed software that will let you multiplex the stream. You could watch it on your phone, but then your family misses out. They could keep watching, but then you miss out. Nobody is allowed to write software that does anything Columbia don't want you to do. Columbia want the option to charge you more when you go to let your cat in, even if they don't actually make it possible yet.

C. Fox make a movie. Apple buys the rights to sell it on iTunes. You buy it from iTunes. You want to watch it on your phone. Fox want you to buy the movie again if you use anything not made by Apple.

Without DRM, you just transfer it to your phone and watch it, since the player on any phone, whether made by Apple or anyone else, can read the video file.

With DRM, only Apple can provide a licensed player for the file. If you're using any phone other than an iPhone, you cannot watch it, because nobody else has been allowed to write software that decrypts the media files sold by Apple.

In all three cases, nobody has been stopped from violating a copyright. All three movies are probably available on file sharing sites. The only people who are stopped from doing anything are the player providers -- they are forced to provide a user experience that, rather than being optimised for the users, puts potential future revenues first (forcing people to play ads, keeping the door open to charging more for more features later, building artificial obsolescence into content so that if you change ecosystem, you have to purchase the content again).

Arguing that DRM doesn't work is, it turns out, missing the point. DRM is working really well in the video and book space. Sure, the DRM systems have all been broken, but that doesn't matter to the DRM proponents. Licensed DVD players still enforce the restrictions. Mass market providers can't create unlicensed DVD players, so they remain a black or gray market curiosity. DRM failed in the music space not because DRM is doomed, but because the content providers sold their digital content without DRM, and thus enabled all kinds of players they didn't expect (such as "MP3" players). Had CDs been encrypted, iPods would not have been able to read their content, because the content providers would have been able to use their DRM contracts as leverage to prevent it.

DRM's purpose is to give content providers control over software and hardware providers, and it is satisfying that purpose well.

As a corollary to this, look at the companies who are pushing for DRM. Of the ones who would have to implement the DRM, they are all companies over which the content providers already, without DRM, have leverage: the companies that both license content from the content providers and create software or hardware players. Because they license content, the content providers already have leverage against them: they can essentially require them to be pro-DRM if they want the content. The people against the DRM are the users, and the player creators who don't license content. In other words, the people over whom the content producers have no leverage. 
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Ken Wong

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Nice simple visual guide to the 3 main camera exposure settings.
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Ken Wong

Bug Reporting (Read FAQs 1st)  - 
 
Device?  BACON
What nightly are you on? 040815 (08 April 2015)
Clean or Dirty flash? Clean
Custom kernel? No
When did it start? After first boot and initial setup.

Brief description:
The Carousel by Dropbox app crashes when loading once the Dropbox account is linked, on the screen where it shows all the photos. Clearing the app data and cache and setting up the app again can reproduce the crash. Problem persists after reboot.

Steps to replicate
1. Install Carousel by Dropbox from Google Play Store
2. Start Carousel and connect to Dropbox account that has some photos in it
3. App will crash once the Dropbox account is linked and the gallery loads up, and on every subsequent attempt to start the app.

Logcat @ http://pastebin.com/26AJ7wFi
Note pastebin is set to expire after a month.

EDIT: Formatted nightly version date
EDIT: Added note to description about problem persisting after reboot.
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Dave Kessler's profile photoRaja Mungamuri's profile photoKen Wong's profile photo
14 comments
 
I have done so (dirty flash on top of 040915 using Exodus Updater), and do not see the issue presenting so far. 
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Ken Wong

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I went there with friends to enjoy some coffee together. We all ordered flat whites, and I liked the taste of the coffee a lot - not over roasted like the big chain cafés. The café is quite nicely furnished and I did enjoy the time spent there.
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
A very simple steak and sides menu. They do one kind of steak and they do it really well, at a very reasonable price. Atmosphere was more than satisfactory.
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
Good sized portions for the price. Food was tasty, restaurant spacious and clean, staff responsive.
Food: Very GoodDecor: GoodService: Very Good
Public - 2 years ago
reviewed 2 years ago
6 reviews
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Tasty cakes, and very tasty coffee. They have several brewing methods available for their coffee and it is fun trying the siphon brew.
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
Food was tasty and service was reasonably fast although not lightning quick, but that was to be expected on a Friday evening. I was the designated driver of the party so didn't have the beers this time, but there were positive comments all round. We enjoyed our time there and would go there again.
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago