Profile cover photo
Profile photo
The Emmaus Centre
3 followers -
Welcome to Tranquility!
Welcome to Tranquility!

3 followers
About
Posts

Post has attachment
Meditation: A Spiritual discipline. A discipline of Presence.

Mindfulness Meditation is the practice to awaken people to the presence of the Spirit within us, helping us be still and know. Meditation is more than slowing down and calming the mind, in the Christian Tradition, meditation is a Prayer of silence and stillness, it is a simple direct method of making us present to God in love. We are not thinking about God, we are not asking God for anything, nor are we thanking God. We are just being one with God. Meditation has been a part of Christian prayer since the beginning. “The Christian tradition comprises three major expressions of the life of prayer: vocal prayer, meditation, and contemplative prayer. They have in common the recollection of the heart.”


Here’s One Method for Practicing Meditation

To meditate, we adapt a good sitting posture, keeping our feet on the ground, our hands gently resting on our laps and our eyes gently closed.

In Christian meditation, as in a lot of meditations, we use a prayer, a word or mantra. The word we recommend is Ma Ra Na Tha. It means “Come Lord”. This word is found in the Scriptures and is the earliest known prayer of the Christian Community. We say the word from the beginning of the meditation to the end and we listen to it as a sound in our hearts. That is why it is sometimes called the prayer of the heart. “We do not know what we ought to pray for, but the Spirit himself intercedes for us through wordless groans.” – Romans 8:26-27

We meditate every morning and evening for 20 to 30 minutes. Distractions will come but we just let them float past. Be patient with yourself. As soon as we become aware of them we just gently return to the mantra.

Meditation is very simple but it is not easy, as we are conditioned for distraction. It is an act of faith and perseverance. The fruits of meditation are love, peace, compassion, patience, understanding, joy, tolerance, kindness, freedom, faithfulness, humility and self-control – Galatians 5.

Through the elements of Mediation; Silence, Stillness and Simplicity, we will return to our gifts outlined and live out of them. Plus, we may deepen our spiritual life leading to inner peace.

“There is no part-time or partial prayer, as if the Spirit were not always alive in our heart. But there are times, our twice-daily meditation, when we make a complete turn of consciousness towards this ever-present reality. There comes a level of awakening when our awareness of this reality is constant, throughout our most diverse activities and concerns.” – Benedictine monk John Main
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Know Yourself Well

Because we are all wonderfully designed by God, so carefully and lovingly put together, we have astonishing capacities to influence and transform each other at profound levels of our living. It is like a vibrant network of mutual interconnectedness, a flow of energy and inner power that began in creation and was revealed and personified in Jesus at the incarnation. A theology of nature and grace concerns itself with graced experiences in the unfolding of our humanity and of creation itself, an unfolding that is the continuing fleshing out in time and space of the implications of the once-for-all moment when God became human.

There is something intensely personal about the interchange that happens in sharing the good news. It is as though Jesus was revealing something of his own self every time he explains things to those around him. Heart spoke to heart whenever they gathered to search for the Father’s love and meaning in the gifts of their lives. In other words we can only really be present to someone else to the same extent as we are present to ourselves. We can only understand another to the same extent as we understand ourselves. We can only walk the Emmaus journey with others to the extent that we have walked it within our own hearts. It is only when we have travelled the twists and turns of the labyrinth of our own holy mystery that we can be a grace for another. . . It is only to the extent that any of us know ourselves, that we can begin to glimpse anything of God. It is well to remember the noverim me, noverim te of Saint Augustine. ‘I seek to know myself, oh Lord, so that I may know thee all the more’. . . This is not about the need to be perfect; it is about the need to be aware of our inner dividedness, of our fears and shadows, of the unfamiliar terrain of our own complex interiority. The hidden self is notoriously shy of the light.

Jesus revealed that true ministry is found only in the individual and community that can accept their own vulnerability. We all find that a hard thing to do; and so does the institutional church itself. We have no choice about this principle. It is the way of incarnation.

‘What the world and the Church needs today’, to quote Pope John Paul II, ‘are heralds of the Gospel who are experts in humanity, who know the depth of the human heart, who can share the joys, hopes, agonies and distress of people today, and who are, at the same time, contemplatives who have fallen in love with God.

Without such “expertise “, especially around the fundamental wounded-ness at the heart of our lives, there will be something vital missing in our attempts to spread the Good News of salvation. That vulnerability, in fact, is the essential aspect of our humanity that God needed in Jesus, and now needs in us, to make the divine gift of power in our powerlessness tangible and visible to a suffering world.

(Begin with the Heart pp 128 -130)
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
We Are Spiritual Beings

In the beautiful theology of creation and incarnation, of nature and grace, the fleshing of God has revealed, once and for all, what it means to be truly human. We achieve our true humanity, not by running away from the world and its joys and pleasures, or by turning our backs on it in fear or doubt. Christ does not reveal what it is to be divine but what it is to be human. It is often said that we are not human beings trying to become spiritual. We are spiritual beings trying to become truly human. That our often faint and distorted God-likeness might become purified, clarified, intensified and completed in us, is the purpose of creation and incarnation.
This completion, this transformation is not something added on from outside, so to speak, to our ‘mere’ human nature – a kind of divine layer on top of our ordinary humanity. It is rather the revelation of the intrinsic meaning of our very lives. The graced unfolding of our lives is God’s dream within us becoming true.

There is a lift and a depth about a theology of nature and grace. It discerns the free movement of the Holy Spirit wherever people are committed to genuine human values and humanitarian pursuits. It identifies the longing for God in all human longing. It sees God’s spirit ranging across the whole spectrum of creation, of history and of individual experiences in ways far beyond the constricted and limited places, people and things to which many of our textbook theologies, catechisms and homiletic suggestions would restrict it. It takes its shape and texture from the passion of Jesus for making possible for everybody, the actual here-and-now experience of the abundant life. And from the wild freedom of the Holy Spirit.

Moral theologian Father Kevin Kelly has written: ‘Evangelisation is really about something very simple, wonderful and exciting. It is about being truly human, each in our own unique way, and both translating and interpreting God’s love story in the language of our modern age – and so helping people read that same story in the wonder of their own being and even in the ambiguity of their lives.’
(Begin with the Heart pp162,163)
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Loss and Recovery with Fr Jim Cogley Priest, Wood Turner and Psychotherapist.
Date: November 21, 2017.
Time: 10:00 am to 4:30 pm.
Type of event: Non-residential: €60 Type of Event: 1 Day Workshop

This workshop will explore the many facets of loss as a profound invitation to find wholeness. “ When the heart weeps for what it has lost, the spirit dances for what it has”. https://goo.gl/vo3E4u
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Why has back pain become a common problem?
Did you know that back pain, migraine or insomnia can be a cause of tension accumulated over many years of stressful living? Many times, it may even start in childhood. Read More: https://goo.gl/XGSfrC
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
The importance of self-care and best practices to nurture our mind and body. I’m sure you have often heard the analogy of the Oxygen Mask!  “In order to help others, you have to help yourself first”. Read More: https://goo.gl/BQCeF2
Photo
Add a comment...
Wait while more posts are being loaded