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John Hannah
792 followers -
Front-end developer, blogger, good in an emergency, freakishly strong for my size.
Front-end developer, blogger, good in an emergency, freakishly strong for my size.

792 followers
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Holy hell this is all kinds of epic.

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It's all about perspective.
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My latest post on evaluating performance for responsive websites.

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Our answer?

H/t to +Mandy Edwards who shared this on Twitter. 

I'm saving this image in my reserves for whenever someone complains about pricing or questions the value of design for their business. 
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An excerpt from my latest post...

*Some Things that Work for Responsive Design*

1.  Instead of Photoshop comps, use Style Tiles and then [build a prototype](http://www.creativebloq.com/design/prototyping-code-9116762) using HTML and CSS, iterating with the client as you go. The client gets to play with the site early and often and can better understand any problems that may pop up.

2.   If possible, don't add the things to the site that are on the Style Tile until near the end of the project. Try to focus instead on user experience, user flows and performance. When you add the aesthetic elements early, everyone involved can start to lose focus on the essential fundamentals of the design.

3.  Think over the choice of using a CSS framework very carefully. Many teams will use a framework like Foundation or Bootstrap to make the prototype I mentioned in #1 and then use custom code on the actual site.

4.   If using a content management system, take a close look at the default markup the system provides. If it's bloated, override it if you can.

5.  Make performance a priority. If you go with a 'mobile first' approach, you'll have an easier time with this in the long run. There are some great tips in [this post](https://developers.google.com/webmasters/smartphone-sites/website-improvement-checklist) from Google on getting your site whipped into shape. Performance may be the most important factor in making your site a good experience for mobile users.

6.  If you're a designer, learn HTML and CSS. It is essential to you being able to make good decisions when designing responsive websites. I would also advise against using generators or tools to create responsive mockups. They keep you from truly understanding the medium in which you are working.

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http://alistapart.com/blog/post/responsive-design-the-picture-element-comes-of-age

“This week we released a new version of Picturefill that will make the real picture element work in existing browsers, which means you can start using picture today.” #RWD   #webstandards  

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Nice...

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