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Alexandra and Hillyfields Vets Ltd
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We recently had a very poorly puppy in called Nala, she unfortunately was suffering from Parvovirus which can be deadly for pups like her. Luckily her owners brought her in very quickly, where she had some very intensive treatment and we’re pleased to say made a good recovery 😊 it’s a reminder that these diseases are still about and it’s important to keep your pets vaccinations up to date
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11/20/17
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We recently held a Macmillan coffee and cake morning at Hillyfields vets. It was very successful! We ran a Dog and Cat raffle and the lucky winners were... Casper the Cat and Lola the Dog! We hope they enjoyed their hampers :)
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10/20/17
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BRAVERY AWARD.

A few weeks ago Caspar was sadly suffering from a blocked bladder. This meant he was unable to urinate due to a build-up of urinary crystals, mucous, cells and inflammation that had then blocked his urethra. He had to be hospitalised with emergency, intensive nursing care for 4 days.
We are giving the bravery award to Caspar because throughout all his care he was always very brave and well behaved. He was the best patient we could ask for!
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9/12/17
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Countryside rules: Enjoy the beautiful countryside responsibly with your dog.

Keep dogs on leads …. Dog walkers are being urged to keep dogs on a lead and under control in the countryside after a series of dog attacks on sheep.

Your dog may be having fun chasing the livestock but it can have massive consequences:
1. Abortions and loss of unborn lambs or calves.
2. Farmers are allowed by law to shoot any dogs that are worrying livestock
3. The dog owner or person responsible for the animal at the time is guilty of an offence under the Dogs (Protection of Livestock) Act 1953 and may be sued for compensation by the farmer.


Bag it – Bin it! ….Dog poo can spread disease to farm animals causing fertility problems and abortions. Please bag it and dispose of it properly in a poo bin or at home.


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What to do if you find a
Dog by law dogs must be kept under close control at all times, be microchipped and wearing an ID tag on a collar. You can be fined if they stray and are found to have no ID tag or microchip. Contact your local council dog warden if you find a healthy stray dog. Vets can check the dog for a microchip and contact the owner if the details registered to the microchip are up to date. Contact the RSPCA before taking the dog to the vets if you find an injured or unwell dog.
Cat If it looks healthy and well fed then the chances are it has an owner. Cats often dont wear collars and regularly visit neighbouring gardens/houses so are often thought to be a stray when they do belong to someone. Feeding these cats will just encourage them to return. If the cat is healthy - knock on local doors to see if its from the area or take it to the vets to be scanned for a microchip. If you find an injured or unwell cat call the RSPCA before taking to the vets.
If you think a wild animal/bird needs emergency first aid, they can be taken to the vets but Secret World and the RSPCA have specialist skills and facilities to treat wildlife.
RSPCAs 24hr phone line is 0300 1234 999
Secret World is 01278 783250/07954036687
Baby birds - Leave it alone as their mother will usually be close by. If you are worried you could go back to the area later check if its still alone. If you find a fledgling in immediate danger you can move it a short distance out of harms way. Orphaned/sick/injured or un-feathered baby birds - place in a well ventilated cardboard box and take to your local wildlife rescue.
Deer - If you find a fawn do not touch! This could leave an unfamiliar scent on the fawn and may lead the mother to abandon it. They are often left for long periods alone but are being cared for. If a fawn is sick or injured then call Secret World or the RSPCA.
Hedgehogs - If you see a Hedgehog out during the day, is sick or injured please contact Secret World or the RSPCA.
Fox or badger cubs - Do not handle the cub (they can bite when frightened) unless it is in immediate danger, in which case move it to a safe spot nearby and make an exact note where you found it. If its eyes are open then they are usually fine and the parents will be nearby. You can leave a supply of water and dog food near by and return in 24hrs if concerned. If it is obviously sick or injured then call Secret World or the RSPCA.
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Introducing the…. Senior Health Check to specifically tailor the veterinary visit to our very important OAPs.

As our pets get older there are certain diseases that can start to affect their health and if these are identified early can be managed to make the twilight years more enjoyable.

DOGS £70 saving 55% CATS £75 saving 70% (includes blood pressure measurement). A thyroid blood check for your cat can be carried out for an additional £25.

This new service will be available for dogs over 7 years and cats over 10 years old. The senior health check is with a vet and includes a general examination, blood sample to check major system function such as the liver and kidneys and analysis of a urine sample to check the kidneys are functioning properly.

Examples of diseases affecting older pets that can be identified with the senior health check are: Hyperthyroidism and renal disease in cats, diabetes, age-related loss of mental function and activity levels due to brain degeneration, dental disease, arthritis and heart disease.

If you would like to find out more about our senior health checks please don’t hesitate to call or pop-in to speak to us.
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We have awarded Poppy with an Alexandra and Hillyfields Vets bravery award and here's why:
Poppy, a one year old domestic long haired cat came into our Clevedon practice as an emergency back at the beginning of July. After being sedated, Poppy was found to have multiple wounds to her back legs with ligaments, tendons and joints being exposed. The wounds were cleaned and sutured and her right leg was dressed. Poppy visited us twice a week to have her dressing changed but despite her left leg healing well, her right leg inevitably became infected causing a lot of her skin to slough away (fall off!). This left a large wound from her toes up to her hock. Although this wound would have healed eventually, to speed the process up Poppy had a skin graft performed. This involved a piece of skin being taken from her flank and carefully attached to her leg to cover the exposed tissue. Skin grafts aren’t always successful if blood vessels don’t attach to the transferred piece of skin but luckily for Poppy, her skin graft took. Following the skin graft, Poppy did have to have one of her toes amputated as this had not healed.
Poppy has been awarded this bravery award for always being a star patient with each dressing change and procedure. She required sedation or a general anaesthetic each time as this would have been too uncomfortable without. Afterwards, she was always happy to tuck into a bowl full of well-deserved food
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12/14/16
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Curly has received an Alexandra and Hillyfields Vets Bravery Award! Here's why:

Curly was rehomed by his owners three years ago and in that time he has been back and forth to the practice a fair few times. Last July, Curly was under the weather and after a couple of visits to the practice further investigation was required. Following an ultrasound scan it was discovered that Curly had problems with his liver, pancreas and urinary bladder. Separate to this, Curly was also diagnosed with a heart murmour.
Curly did improve with medication and a veterinary diet, however due to a urolith (bladder stone) he began to leak urine and was painful in his abdomen. The x-ray taken of his abdomen to confirm the presence of the urolith also showed that Curly’s prostate was enlarged and the treatment for this is castration. Therefore Curly had to have a cystotomy (surgery of the bladder) to remove the urolith and castration. It doesn’t end there. When the vet was performing the cystotomy, they discovered that Curly’s bladder was attached to his umbilicus and he had an umbilical hernia, both of which needed correcting. So in one day Curly had three surgical procedures performed. As you can see from the picture above of Curly on holiday, he has not looked back since.
Curly is receiving this award as he has literally “bounced back” and has always been a brave, happy chap despite everything. Well done Curly.
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