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Terry Lawson
2,842 followers -
I'm an Edmonton, Alberta, Canada based photographer who enjoys sharing views through my lens
I'm an Edmonton, Alberta, Canada based photographer who enjoys sharing views through my lens

2,842 followers
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I am still feeling the joy of my experience in Churchill, Manitoba surrounded by polar bears gathering to head out on the ice cap for the winter. The "Lords of the Arctic" are the iconic representation of Canada's North. The Western Hudson Bay Polar Bears numbering 900 to 1000 bears are one of 19 polar bear populations in the world. The total number of polar bears in the world number approximately 20,000-25,000. On my trip I was fortunate to see 25 of those bears. I feel so fortunate to have seen these amazing animals in the wild. Will my children and grandchildren have the same opportunity? The bears are dependent on the ice cap for their winter feeding. With climate change there are suggestions that before mid-century we could have a nearly ice-free Arctic in the summer. This increases the urgency with which we must act to reduce our greenhouse gas emissions to delay or avoid some of the worst consequences of climate change. Polar bears have relatively high genetic diversity within the species and can disperse over very long distances, suggesting that they may have some capacity to adapt to the ongoing changes in the Arctic. However, their dependence on sea ice makes them highly vulnerable to a changing climate. Polar bears rely heavily on the sea ice environment for traveling, hunting, mating, resting, and in some areas, maternal dens. In particular, they depend heavily on sea ice-dependent prey, such as ringed and bearded seals. Additionally, their long generation time and low reproductive rate may limit their ability to adapt to changes in the environment. Priorities for climate-informed polar bear conservation should include identifying and protecting the “last ice areas,” the parts of the Arctic that are projected to retain sea ice farthest into the future. It is also important to increase monitoring of polar bear populations, particularly their responses to declining sea ice. And as polar bears spend more time on land, we need to be prepared to manage for increased human-polar bear conflict.
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I recently spent a day on the shore of Hudson Bay, near Churchill, Manitoba watching polar bears as they gather to wait for the ice to form so they can head out onto the ice cap for the winter. What a thrilling day made possible by Classic Canadian Tours.
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Over the last few years here on the Alberta prairies, the farmers have had a really tough time during harvest. This year is no exception as snow, rain and cold temperatures arrived early in September making getting their crops off the fields extremely difficult. Is this the new norm?
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The End of the World in Edmonton, Alberta sits at the top of the river bank on Saskatchewan Drive in the Belgravia neighbourhood. It’s above the remains of Keillor Road, which was closed to traffic in 1991 before crumbling into the river. The scenic spot offers a breathtaking view of the river valley and west Edmonton. Large pillars of an old retaining wall form a makeshift ledge to sit on, but can also be quite dangerous. The steep embankment is several metres below and rebar has become exposed from the deteriorating concrete, making the site a serious safety risk. The fenced-off area is restricted and regularly patrolled — but that hasn’t deterred those looking to take in the view and party at the secluded spot. They’ve become a thorn in the side for Belgravia residents, who have complained of increased noise, litter, parking and late night activity. The city is hoping to address those concerns by developing the site. A study on the slope stability recommended that a viewpoint with a safety fence be built on top of the concrete pillars, using the existing trails to access the viewpoint. Stairs and benches would also be added. I snuck down there today to get a photo.
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No matter how much planning you do to try to be in the right place at the right time to take photos, there are those conditions that arise that require you to reconsider those plans. As a photographer I initially head to a location to take photos having made plans that will hopefully allow me to take the photos I have visualized. But from experience, I have come to expect that weather or light will likely require me to modify the photos I will be taking. I have also come to realize that even though the conditions are not what I hoped they would be, there are still those elements that will still be interesting and worth pursuing in order to tell a different story. While in Canmore, Alberta recently, I headed out to hike to Grassi Lakes with great expectations of taking photos of the lakes nestled in the mountains, but the weather had other ideas. So I had to look for other possibilities, other images that also give a sense of the beauty of the mountains.
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I have been looking for this spot every time I have stayed in Canmore, Alberta. The local photographers were tight lipped about giving the exact location other than it is on Policeman's Creek which flows thru town. On my recent trip I found it. What an amazing spot for reflections of the Rocky Mountains. This photos shows the drama of the Three Sisters.
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There is nothing like being up above tree line in the Rocky Mountains. Recently I hiked up to 2500 m into Ptarmigan Cirque at the top of Highwood Pass in Alberta, Canada. To be alone and surrounded by silence, cool mountain air and the smell of the meadow is unforgettable.
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I headed out to take photos early this morning of the Three Sisters in Canmore, Alberta, Canada, and ran into other photographers from Colorado, Japan and Netherlands. A joyous morning.
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A stormy day brings mystery to the Rocky Mountains in Banff National Park as the clouds descend on Castle Mountain.
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Went to Vermillion Lakes in Banff National Park for sunrise with hopes, according to the weather report, of partially cloudy skies. Wrong. But that doesn't mean that the opportunity for interesting photos are not possible. The blue light before sunrise did not disappoint.
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