A $35 computer isn't $35 if you have to buy a bunch of peripherals for it.  I've been searching for a way that students can use existing equipment to do their exercises, etc for my class.  To test out one such setup. I just got my pi running a VNC server to my old (2007 or so) iMac (pic attached). There's a story in here about how the Internet works.

Back in the Fall I posted something on HASTAC.org about how I was going to teach a course using the #raspberrypi  :
http://hastac.org/blogs/eah13/2012/12/02/code-and-computation-humans-syllabus-sketch

+Barry Peddycord III  posted a comment about a +Splat Space event in Raleigh in January:
http://hastac.org/blogs/eah13/2012/12/02/code-and-computation-humans-syllabus-sketch#comment-20901

During this event and the Saturday after +Pete Soper showed off his Pi prowess by VNCing to a Pi through a Pi.  It was then that it kinda started to dawn on me that I could use VNC in the classroom.  But it's been on the back burner until +Chris Lindgren posted this comment on that post:
http://hastac.org/blogs/eah13/2012/12/02/code-and-computation-humans-syllabus-sketch#comment-21288

His comments, beyond being super exciting to hear about his vision for a Pi-based composition course, linked to this super awesome tutorial by +Interlock Rochester, a hackerspace in Rocherster, NY, which I had never heard of:
http://hastac.org/blogs/eah13/2012/12/02/code-and-computation-humans-syllabus-sketch#comment-21288

The Interlock tutorial itself is here:
http://interlockroc.org/2012/12/06/raspberry-pi-macgyver/

A theme I've been noticing in my life lately is that the more focused and excited I've gotten about specific things (like the pi and coding education), the easier it's been to 1) be productive and good at them and 2) find other awesome people and resources related to them.  Keep it comin!
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