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#NFO: Brain Health: Brain Research And News = NeuroFerritinOpathy
#NFO: Brain Health: Brain Research And News = NeuroFerritinOpathy

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Amy Rosoff Davis says, “believe it or not sleep helps your metabolism. when you’re sleep deprived, your blood sugar is lower, which sends false signals to the brain that you are hungrier than you actually are… Plus when you are tired, you don’t always make the best food choices.”

Sleep or lack of sleep not only will make you moody and irritable and mess up your day, it can also trigger increased hunger and appetite. This can totally mess with your metabolism. Getting a good night of sleep can improve your metabolism.

Now that would be a great diet, a sleep diet! Sleep all day to get that metabolism healthier…Now that is a diet I think I could keep.

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Psychologist Deniz Ahmadinia, PsyD, also noted that we search for answers or solutions outside ourselves to fix our supposedly faulty or broken parts. “I often hear various scenarios from clients, such as ‘Once I get this job, once I lose the weight or if I could just make this much more money, then I’ll be happy.” Then I’ll feel better about myself. Then I won’t yearn to crawl out of my skin. Then I won’t feel so utterly uncomfortable.

We become truly comfortable in our own skin when we accept ourselves—even the dark spots we don’t want others to see, said Ahmadinia, who specializes in mindfulness, stress and trauma at the West Los Angeles VA. We “see ourselves completely, as we are, without trying to avoid, run away or resist.”

Of course, this doesn’t happen overnight. But there are practical, meaningful ways you can start feeling more comfortable in your own skin—like below.
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CRISPR will make headlines again in 2018


Increasingly, we were also making promising strides against complex neurodegenerative brain diseases such as Parkinson's and Huntington's diseases.

"The big diseases that will remain a challenge are going to be things like diabetes and obesity, where we have an interaction between our genes and the environment we live in."

Even as soon as 2025, the World Obesity Federation projects the number of severely obese New Zealanders will have ballooned from 222,300 to 325,700.
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From the use of ground-breaking gene-editing techniques that can potentially stop inherited diseases from taking root, to the creation of an artificial womb, here are a few of last year’s most important scientific milestones that could potentially change our future.

Roll on, 2018
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As for what’s next, topping the list is muscular dystrophy and sickle cell. There has been so much progress that the NIH has modified an oversight panel that just a few years ago reviewed every gene therapy experiment in the U.S. Most are considered safe enough to go ahead without the Recombinant DNA Advisory Committee’s review. The panel hasn’t even met for a year.
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The most difficult disorders are now possibly fixed easily.
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With the debut of CRISPR a few years ago, advances in the technology have been happening at a breakneck pace. Here are a few of the remarkable things that gene editing did in 2017.
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If your hand routinely shakes when you hold a drink, sign your name or tap a number into your cellphone, you may fear that you're experiencing signs of Parkinson's disease.

But what you're more likely to have is essential tremor, a common neurological condition that causes an involuntary, rhythmic trembling of the hands during movement but can also affect the head, voice or legs.

While it's often confused with Parkinson's, essential tremor is eight times more common and affects an estimated 10 million people in the U.S., according to the International Essential Tremor Foundation.
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The hope is that CRISPR could be used in a one-time procedure to cure some of the most devastating inherited disorders and cancers, some of which have no or few current treatment options. Scientists want to deploy the technology to fix genetic errors in a person’s DNA, getting at the root of disease.

That might be the dream, but the reality is far different. Already, investigators have delayed the start dates of clinical trials. And the studies slated to start in the next year or two will treat a small number of patients with a few rare diseases. It will probably be years before the technology can be used for more common diseases in more patients.

https://goo.gl/bC9bWw
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CRISPR, which stands for Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats, is a relatively new gene-editing technique based off of a bacteria defense system. Generally speaking, it is a “programmable” system that targets and edits specific pieces of DNA. This technique can also be used as a diagnostic tool.

However, if this clinical trial proves to be a success, or at least does not produce any harmful complications, it could spell a long future of innovative and boundary-pushing CRISPR treatments. From antibiotic resistance to disease reversal and eradication, gene-editing could become a new staple in the medicine of tomorrow

https://futurism.com/first-crispr-clinical-trial/
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