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THE TRUTH ABOUT SELF

According to Buddhism, the problem isn’t that we have a self; on the contrary, there’s never been a real self, so there’s nothing to discard. Nor do we need to get rid of the sense of self; that’s necessary to function in daily life. The problem is a sense of self that feels and believes itself to be separate from the rest of the world. What’s important to realize is that (as Mahayana puts it) the sense of self is “empty” of any self-existence.

—David Loy, A New Buddhist Path

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David R. Loy addresses head-on the most pressing issues of Buddhist philosophy in our time. What is the meaning of enlightenment—is it an escape from the world, or is it a form of psychological healing? How can one reconcile modern scientific theory with ancient religious teachings? What is our role in the universe? Loy shows us that neither Buddhism nor secular society by itself is sufficient to answer these questions. Instead, he investigates t...
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Bruce J
 
This is a very interesting article about Nibbana. http://www.bps.lk/olib/wh/wh165.pdf
bps.lk - www.bps.lk/olib/wh/wh165.pdf
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NEW ON THE WISDOM BLOG:
Liberating Practice: See Your Mind as a Wave

Read an excerpt from our bestseller Saltwater Buddha, now a film showing at festivals around the U.S.

“And though we perceive our minds as separate from others and from the rest of reality, it is actually the case that just as a wave cannot exist apart from water, what we mistake as “our” minds are dependent on the one true mind, the Buddha mind.”

Keep reading:
In the centuries after the Buddha’s death, his followers created rifts and various Buddhist schools—Theravada and Mahayana being just two of the biggest divisions—each claiming to be the authentic one. The Zen tradition (or Chan as it is known in China) officially formed when one school traveled, via the South Indian monk named Bodhidharma, to China around the fourth or fifth century ce.
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HOW TO TALK TO YOUR MIND
wisdompubs.org/book/kindfulness

What if you meditated by treating your mind like a best friend?
Treating your mind like a best friend involves approaching it with warm, engaging attitude: “Hey buddy! Do you want to meditate now? What do you want to watch? How do you want to sit? You tell me how long.” When you treat your mind with kindfulness, your mind does not want to wander off anywhere. It likes your company. You hang out together, chilling out, for far longer than you ever expected.

—Ajahn Brahm, Kindfulness

Read more and get the book: wisdompubs.org/book/kindfulness
When we add kindness to mindfulness we get “kindfulness.” Kindfulness is the cause of relaxation. It brings ease to the body, to the mind, and to the world. Kindfulness allows healing to happen. So don’t just be mindful, be kindful! With his trademark knack for telling engaging stories paired with step-by-step anyone-can-do-it instructions, Brahm brings alive and makes accessible powerful tools for transformation. This slim, beautifully designed ...
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THE BUDDHA ON THE TRUE CAUSE OF SUFFERING
wisdompubs.org/book/connected-discourses-buddha

Suppose, friend, a black ox and a white ox were yoked together by a single harness. Would one be speaking rightly if one were to say: “The black ox is the fetter of the white ox; the white ox is the fetter of the black ox”? No, friend. The black ox is not the fetter of the white ox nor is the white ox the fetter of the black ox, but rather the single harness by which the two are yoked together: that is the fetter there. So too, friend, the eye is not the fetter of forms, nor are mental phenomena the fetter of the mind, but rather the desire and lust that arise there in dependence on both: that is the fetter there.

—The Buddha in The Connected Discourses of the Buddha, translated by Bhikkhu Bodhi

Read more: wisdompubs.org/book/connected-discourses-buddha
This volume offers a complete translation of the Saṃyutta Nikāya, The Connected Discourses of the Buddha, the third of the four great collections in the Sutta Piṭaka of the Pāli Canon. The Saṃyutta Nikāya consists of fifty-six chapters, each governed by a unifying theme that binds together the Buddha’s suttas or discourses. The chapters are organized into five major parts. The first, The Book with Verses, is a compilation of suttas composed large...
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A man named Liu Shiyu asked Yangshan, “May I hear the principle of attaining mind?”

Yangshan said, “If you want to attain mind, then there’s no mind that can be attained. It is this unattainable mind that is known as truth.”

—from Zen’s Chinese Heritage

Read more and get the book: wisdompubs.org/book/zens-chinese-heritage
Zen’s Chinese Heritage traces twenty-five generations of enlightened Buddhist teachers, supplementing their core teachings with history, biography, and poetry. The result is an intimate and profound human portrait of the enlightened Zen ancients, and an unprecedented look into the depths of the rich cultural heritage. In this new edition with even more valuable material, Ferguson surveys generations of Zen masters, moving chronologically through ...
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THE TRUE MEANING OF STUDYING BUDDHISM
wisdompubs.org/book/heartwood-bodhi-tree

In Buddhism, the essential meaning of the word “study” is the unceasing, dedicated observation and investigation of whatever arises in the mind, be it pleasant or unpleasant. Only those familiar with the observation of mind can really understand Dharma.

—Buddhadasa Bhikkhu, Heartwood of the Bodhi Tree
Clear and simple teachings on voidness and living an ethical life. In Heartwood of the Bodhi Tree, Buddhadasa Bhikkhu presents in simple language the philosophy of voidness, or sunnata, that lies at the heart of the Buddhism. By carefully tying voidness to ethical discipline, Buddhadasa provides us clear and open grounds to reflect on the place of the philosophy in our lives. With his ecumenical, stimulating, and enthusiastically engaged approach...
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HOW MEDITATION HELPS YOU UNDERSTAND YOUR LIFE
wisdompubs.org/book/kindfulness

Through meditation and stillness, you acquire the deep data from which you derive insight into cause-and-effect relationships. Much of the Buddha’s teaching is about understanding cause and effect, or where things come from and why they arise. As disciples of the Buddha, if there’s a problem, we investigate it. We use our reason and experience to find out where the problem came from and where it leads. If we see that it leads to a negative or harmful state of body and mind, then we know that it is unwholesome and not connected with wisdom. Next, we investigate backward, to see the process by which that problem arose.

—Ajahn Brahm, Kindfulness

Read more and get the book: wisdompubs.org/book/kindfulness
When we add kindness to mindfulness we get “kindfulness.” Kindfulness is the cause of relaxation. It brings ease to the body, to the mind, and to the world. Kindfulness allows healing to happen. So don’t just be mindful, be kindful! With his trademark knack for telling engaging stories paired with step-by-step anyone-can-do-it instructions, Brahm brings alive and makes accessible powerful tools for transformation. This slim, beautifully designed ...
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DISCOVER THE WISDOM PODCAST
wisdompubs.org/podcast

The Wisdom Podcast is a Buddhist podcast that features interviews with leading thinkers from the Buddhist world. Each episode takes you on a fascinating exploration of Buddhism and meditation as our guests share stories and discuss life-changing practices, timeless philosophies, and new ways to think and live. Recent episodes have featured guests like His Holiness the Karmapa, Bhikkhu Bodhi, Robert Thurman, and Jeffrey Hopkins.

Subscribe in your podcasting app or listen here: wisdompubs.org/podcast
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NEW ON THE WISDOM BLOG: AJAHN BRAHM ON PERFECTION AND GUILT

“When I showed our first visitors around our fledgling monastery, I always tried to avoid taking them past my brick wall. I hated anyone seeing it. Then one day, some three or four months after I finished it, I was walking with a visitor and he saw the wall.

‘That’s a nice wall,’ he casually remarked.

‘Sir,’ I replied in surprise, ‘have you left your glasses in your car? Are you visually impaired? Can’t you see those two bad bricks which spoil the whole wall?’

What he said next changed my whole view of that wall, of myself, and of many other aspects of life.”

Read the full story from Ajahn Brahm:

http://www.wisdompubs.org/blog/201603/perfection-and-guilt-ajahn-brahm
After we purchased the land for our monastery in we were broke. We were in debt. There were no buildings on the land, not even a shed. Those first few weeks we slept not on beds but on old doors we had bought cheaply from the salvage yard; we raised them on bricks at each corner to lift them off the ground. (There were no mattresses, of course—we were forest monks.)
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Nice story!
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THE BUDDHA ON UNDERSTANDING PLEASURE
wisdompubs.org/book/connected-discourses-buddha

The pleasure and joy that arise in dependence on the eye: this is the gratification in the eye. That the eye is impermanent, suffering, and subject to change: this is the danger in the eye. The removal and abandonment of desire and lust from the eye: this is the escape from the eye.

—The Buddha in The Connected Discourses of the Buddha, translated by Bhikkhu Bodhi

Read more: wisdompubs.org/book/connected-discourses-buddha
This volume offers a complete translation of the Saṃyutta Nikāya, The Connected Discourses of the Buddha, the third of the four great collections in the Sutta Piṭaka of the Pāli Canon. The Saṃyutta Nikāya consists of fifty-six chapters, each governed by a unifying theme that binds together the Buddha’s suttas or discourses. The chapters are organized into five major parts. The first, The Book with Verses, is a compilation of suttas composed large...
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NEW FROM WISDOM: a memoir of service to Tibet

Hear a rare inside story of the events that changed Tibet forever.
This is the story of a man who played a crucial role in bringing the plight of the Tibetan people to the world's attention.

Dive into this first-hand account of a pivotal moment in Tibet's history—click here to read the first chapter for free: http://www.wisdompubs.org/book/life-unforeseen/selections
My Early Childhood in Kham. When I look back into the past, I realize there were many times when I missed my mother a great deal. Many of these moments occurred even after I myself had become a father of six children. I never missed my father very much. He passed away when I was a tiny infant, ...
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NEW FROM WISDOM: Explore the rich world of Chinese Zen

In Chan Heart, Chan Mind, you can enter the essence of Chinese Zen from the perspective of a young, dynamic, Western-educated teacher.
Featuring the lyrical simplicity of Thich Nhat Hanh and the engaging storytelling of Ajahn Brahm, this is a great book for those familiar with Zen, newcomers curious about Chan, and anyone who appreciates beauty.

Click here to read the first chapter for free: wisdompubs.org/book/chan-heart-chan-mind/selections
MAKING INK. My ordination master, Songnian, was renowned for his calligraphy and considered a National Living Treasure in Singapore. We Chinese say the way you write tells a lot about who you are. Of Songnian, the man who shaved my head, they used to say, “His writing is without fire.
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