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Sean Bradshaw
175 followers -
Gamer, Auto Racer, Gadgeteer, and all around nice guy.
Gamer, Auto Racer, Gadgeteer, and all around nice guy.

175 followers
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Olivia Nuzzi from New York Magazine could totally be Lydia if she was a brunette.
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I called it. Well not here, but with friends. I suggested that Gorsuch was probably a great Judge, but his idea of "following the law" as a Supreme Court Justice was a bit ignorant based on the actual job. He shouldn't have been confirmed just based on a fundamental misunderstanding of the actual job he was being asked to do. He's a small, weak minded fool, who's been promoted beyond his level of competence, which is a pity since now he's there until he wants to retire.
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I feel bad, Mozilla, by their own admission has dropped the ball with their browser by spending time on Firefox OS. This has given Microsoft time to catch up, and now I'm finding Microsoft Edge to be a better browser, at least on the insider builds of Windows. I feel like for everyone else, you'll see with the Creators Update that Edge will be quick and useful with a decent set of extensions. I recently got a new Dell, and haven't bothered installing Firefox, just continuing to use Edge. That said, it doesn't quite have the developers tools to compete with Chrome, but if Microsoft keeps spending effort on it, hopefully it will compete there too in another year or so.

The biggest thing is that Firefox bogs down on video playbacks and has a tendency to crash. Edge however handles it without any problem. Why don't I use Chrome then? I don't like to put all my information into one basket, and don't want to give Google my entire life, despite them doing well at security and not giving away your info to third parties, it still makes me nervous to give one company too much influence on my life. So I use Chrome for web development effort and pick another browser for personal use, that used to be Firefox, but now Edge is winning out.
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I had a thought this morning as I was meditating in yoga class, how many +GoPro Session camera's would you need to create a solid ring of them in geosynchronous orbit. So I decided I needed to figure it out.

According to Wikipedia the radius from the center of the Earth to geosynchronous orbit is 42,164km. Thanks for the shortcut of not having to add in the radius of the Earth and the altitude, that's awesome.

That makes the circumference of the ring you'd need to be 264924.22529192007km.

Unfortunately the GoPro session isn't measured in km, so the number is about to get really big, or about 2.6492e+11 in milimeters. I hate scientific notation.

And then the simple effort of dividing that by 38mm.

It would take close to 6,971,690,140 (give or take 10) or almost 7 trillion GoPro Sessions to create a Dyson ring of them.

Assuming that you didn't get any kind of bulk discount that would be US$2.1 quadrillion. Maybe +GoPro could give us a discount? Or themselves come up with a wholesale number?

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This morning I was vindicated in my architecture choices for the web application at work. I made the early decision to go to the effort of extracting out subpage controllers (javascript code) from the entire application and keep them modularized and only load on demand. It created some waterfall states, where one javascript file figures out what it needs and then goes and requests the next javascript file. It sounds like it would be a mess of linear code transfers and execution, but it turns out over an application that spans 10 or so pages that including ALL that javascript into one massive file that loads initially causes such a backup of code to transfer, evaluate, and actually run can take much longer than one should normally be required to wait for.

One of my co-workers decided to go the latter method for what's supposed to be a minimalist SDK, and he ended up with more transfer time for his enormous JS file than I have transfer and render time for my entire page with images. All told, the minimalist SDK takes twice as long to load for my entire initial page experience.

You can see mine on the bottom. Part of it is that my page in it's entirety is 690kb and his JS file alone is 787kb, but loading assets on demand rather than when your app is starting up is a huge benefit. You may never need half the assets that you're getting in that initial payload, but you're still loading and running them every time, and on mobile devices that's money and battery that's being spent.
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This is a few years old, but still really cool.
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It's pretty interesting to have gone from:
https://www.extremetech.com/computing/193469-windows-10-is-great-but-it-wont-stop-the-pc-from-dying-and-taking-microsoft-with-it

to:
http://www.theverge.com/ces/2017/1/4/14167980/microsoft-windows-10-pc-laptops-desktops-interesting-again-ces-2017

In just a little over three years. What's really interesting is that Extreme Tech has made it's existence based on PC's and building them to be the fastest that the latest tech money can buy can get you to, and there they were calling Windows 10 the Microsoft killer. Fun.

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There is no excuse for a car to ever hit a slower moving object, it will always be driver error, and if it comes down to it, everyone in the car needs to die every time no question in my mind. In addition, these examples are all aweful. You can't see forward in the direction of travel where there could be a bus full of people approaching this spot in the opposite direct of the car depicted. By changing lanes in any scenario you are then potentially killing 40 or more people. So this whole series of examples is useless.

Basically the moral dilemma is "why can't the car stop in time for a visible crosswalk, or road barrier. The particular example you see here also begs the question of why the barrier is at the end of this road and not the beginning. This is aweful on so many levels I can't even.
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Epstein is not wrong, we are paying for Google Services with our freedom. What he leave out though is the part where the moment Google breaks the trust we give them by paying for their services with our clicks, searches, location, and browsing, in aggregate is the moment everyone conveniently switches to every other search engine, and starts dropping all the other Google services. All it takes is one person with the proof and tenacity to get the word out that Google or Facebook has abused their information and those companies and their hundreds of thousands of employees are near immediately out of work. That's a risk those companies cannot even fathom, so it's in their best interests to keep you happy, keep your personal information on the down low, and keep it internal rather than actually selling it to the companies that advertise with them. So yes, it's a risk on your part by letting them continually aggregate your personality, but it's a far far bigger risk for them to actually have it.
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