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The Sun Today
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Solar Facts and Space Weather
Solar Facts and Space Weather

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The most recent Solar Storm Forecast from +TamithaSkov  - "The Sun has quickly kicked things into high gear this week with a massive active region that has fired 7 big flares and 3 partly Earth-directed solar storms in just a few days. We continue to wait for signs of the storms to hit Earth and are keeping a close eye for more flares. Catch up on some amazing aurora from the huge storm recently and see how the Sun will affect you this week."
https://youtu.be/F0res1dCmew

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Aurora! G3 (STRONG) geomagnetic storm levels have been reached because of the arrival of a CME. The CME is associated with a filament eruption from Aug. 12. The CME reaching the ACE spacecraft roughly 1 million miles before Earth is visible in the solar wind data. High latitudes should get some nice lights well into tomorrow. Good luck aurora hunters! credit: NOAA
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"One small step for [a] man, one giant leap for mankind" - Armstrong. 46 years ago today on July 20, 1969, Apollo 11 astronauts Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin landed on the lunar surface in the Sea of Tranquility. 6 hours after landing Neil Armstrong became the first human being to set foot on the moon. credit: NASA
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2015-07-20
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A stream of high-speed solar wind from a coronal hole has reached Earth. This has unsettled the magnetosphere giving us a G1 geomagnetic storm, G2 is possible. This could mean aurora at higher latitudes. Watchers look out! Here are traces of the solar wind data from the ACE spacecraft, which sits 1 million miles in front of Earth in the direction of the sun. The increase in speed from the stream is apparent in the data. credit: NOAA/NASA
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Using a Black Hole Telescope to Look at the X-ray Sun: A space telescope designed to look into the furthest most reaches of space at some of the most energetic phenomena in the known universe has, once again, been turned to face our nearest star, producing a rare and beautiful insight to our X-ray sun. ...
Image credit: Flaring, active regions of our Sun are highlighted in this new image combining observations from several telescopes. NASA/JPL-CALTECH/GSFC/JAXA http://bit.ly/1HkWiDq
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Here is the CME impact from yesterday. An interplanetary shock was detected by the ACE spacecraft (our solarwind watchdog) at 12:57 UT (8:57 am EDT.) The shock was caused by the CME we had been expecting. This is several hours early but it is within the average error of plus or minus 7 hours. NASA scientists expected a strong magnetospheric compression and geomagnetic storm. And that would mean more aurora! Here is a look at the ACE solarwind data, which shows the sudden change in speed and density due to the CME shock. So far geomagnetic activity has been low until just now. Maybe there is more to com.  credit: NASA/NOAA
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Eruption! AR12371 does it again. The region erupted releasing an M7.9 (peaking around 8:16 UT). A nice coronal wave ripped across the solar surface and material was thrown into space giving us a CME that could have an Earthward component. We are waiting for models from NASA and NOAA. This video uses SDO 171 and 193 angstrom images to give us a good look at the flare, wave and some of the ejecta. This imagery shows us solar material at temperatures of around 600,000 to 1.5 million Kelvin. credit: NASA/SDO

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Here comes the next one. These are images from the SOHO/LASCO C2 and C3 instruments showing the CME from the eruption posted about yesterday. This CME left the sun with an average velocity of around 1100 km/s (~4 million km/hr). Based on preliminary heliospheric modeling carried out at NASA GSFC Space Weather Research Center, it's estimated that this CME will most likely impact Earth. Simulations indicate the CME will reach Earth today (6/24) around 18:18 UT (2:18 pm EDT.)  The CME comes from the same region (AR12371) as the previous CME that reached Earth on 6/22 giving us a descent geomagnetic storm. So all indications are that we are in store for some more geomagnetic activity and aurora. It could be comparable to the storm from 6/22. Aurora watchers - look up! (The LASCO images show the instruments C2 (red) and C3 (blue). Both images show the original data on the left and a difference image on the right. Difference images are created by subtracting two consecutive frames to see how the image has changed.) credit: NASA/ESA/SOHO
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2015-06-24
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Geomagnetic activity continues to calm but there is more to come. Even as activity was picking up at Earth, region AR12371 erupted with another flare and CME. GOES registered X-rays reaching the M6.5 solar flare level at the peak time of 18:23 UT (2:23 pm EDT). This eruption produced a wave over the solar surface and a decrease in brightness around the region (called a dimming.) These are tell-tale signs of a CME. Here is the eruption observed by SDO in the 171 and 193 angstrom wavelengths of extreme-ultraviolet light. This shows us temperatures around 600,000 K and 1 million K respectively. credit: NASA/SDO 

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Last night many got an amazing auroral show. Some observed the ethereal lights at lower latitudes than many predictions. Reports have come in from as far south as Nothern Georgia in the US. The images shown here are from Massachusetts, Colorado, Virginia, Montana, Wyoming, Minnesota, South Dakota and Michigan in the US. All shared by spaceweather.com
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2015-06-23
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