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Therma
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Imagine. Design. Build.
Imagine. Design. Build.

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Before and after at a major biopharmaceutical job site:
Concrete slurry being poured over 14" chilled water supply pipelines. The purple pipes in the underground trench are 4" water treatment pipes. The purpose of the slurry is to encase the underground piping and protect it while the sandbags serve as a berm so that the slurry doesn't overspill on the mechanical joints in the background.
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6/7/17
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Check out these photos from a major biopharmaceutical job site in South San Francisco. The goal was to streamline and modernize the RW/CW distribution for the campus while making it more sustainable.
Photographed is the main chiller plant for the campus; pipe that runs up the hillside that leads to research and development; and pipe that drops down into the area of the campus where the labs are.
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6/6/17
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Chris Parrette of Therma was recently a guest speaker on insurance and contract legalities at Local 393's Project Manager Development course.
Erica Paul is the lead instructor of the course and has done a fantastic job of teaching the students project management and leadership skills. Thank you, Erica!
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Our Plumbing Service team was recently involved in the excavation of 250 ft of tunnel under an existing building to access and replace failed underground utilities. The “L” shaped building in Foster City was the site of two connecting terminals. One tunnel was 150 ft and the adjoining tunnel was 100 ft in length. Therma implemented the use of their hydro excavation truck which was hugely successful in dirt removal from under the pre-existing slab.

These photos were taken between the 90-250 ft marks in the tunnel.
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5/31/17
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Check out these lit up stainless steel foot railings that we recently designed, crafted, and installed in Mountain View. These railings total 970 linear feet and have multiple radii varying from 5 ft to 27 ft. We love the way these look at night!
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Yesterday, SMACNA offered a Bluebeam technology training class led by Michael Breeden. Bluebeam Revu technology is a desktop solution that provides PDF creation, markup, editing and collaboration for the construction industry. Five of Therma's employees were in attendance to learn how to incorporate more efficient paperless workflows.
The class went over Revu Core Basics: Revu Interface; Document Management/Control and Collaboration; and Measurements and Takeoffs. Thank you to Michael Breeden for leading such an informative class!
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Our Plumbing Service team was recently involved in the excavation of 250 ft of tunnel under an existing building to access and replace failed underground utilities. The excavation took 6 weeks and our team completed the job with zero safety infractions. To honor their safety excellence and to show our appreciation of our team, we had Armadillo Willy's delivered to the job site on a Friday afternoon.
Because of the serious risks involved with excavations of this nature, all the workers at this site were confined space trained and certified. Additionally, a Therma site safety supervisor and confined space attendant were on-site at all times during underground activities. Our team utilized two-way radio communication and our site safety supervisor checked in with the team in the tunnel every 3-5 mins. With mechanical fresh air ventilation and four-gas air monitoring, we created the most favorable circumstances for our team's safety and efficiency. Safety is of paramount importance and we feel it's essential to stress how crucial it is to follow OSHA guidelines.
Thanks to our awesome team for staying safe!
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5/23/17
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It is with great pleasure that we announce the promotion of Rick Welch as Therma's HVAC Controls Project Manager serving Stanford University. Rick has been with Therma for almost 7 years, starting out as a Journeyman Electrician for Therma's Controls Department. He has been serving in the capacity as Foreman and coordinating all HVAC Controls work at Stanfrod for the last several years. Rick has also completed electrical schematic designs for HVAC and Industrial Controls projects, knows AutoCAD, is proficient in Distech Controls GFx programming, and is AX certified. He has consistently demonstrated dedication to learning new skills and delivering first class end products to our customers.

We feel that this change will positively enhance our service to Stanford, as well as provide Rick with some unique career challenges and growth opportunities. Congratulations, Rick!
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Falls are the leading cause of deaths and injuries in the construction industry. Each year, about 70 construction workers die in falls from ladders. To avoid this, it's important that workers take the following precautions:
1. Inspect rails, rungs, feet, and spreaders of your ladder for defects or damage every time you use it. If you see any damage, tag it "do not use" and request another ladder.
2. Position your ladder properly and make sure you have level, solid footing and that you're near your work to avoid overreaching. When using an extension ladder, set the base one foot away from the building for every 4 ft of height and tie off the ladder at the top (and bottom, if possible).
3. Use the ladder safely and maintain 3-point contact at all times. Do not stand on the top 2 rungs of a stepladder or the top 4 rungs of an extension ladder. Have your partner hold the ladder to steady it as you ascend.
Note: Don't carry tools and materials while climbing. Use a rope to haul or hoist materials to the upper level.
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Almost every workday, a construction worker in the United States dies as a result of a fall. Wearing a fall protection harness can save your life if used correctly. Follow these steps to avoid a tragedy:
1. Wear a full-body harness that straps around the trunk and thighs. This will distribute the "stopping force" across your thighs, pelvis, chest, and shoulders to prevent severe injury.
2. Inspect your harness regularly for worn or damaged straps, buckles, D-ring(s), and webbing. Make sure to follow the manufacturer's instructions and that all straps are fastened and adjusted correctly.
3. Attach the lanyard to the D-ring on your fall arrest harness, then anchor it securely to an anchor point that can sustain the load without failure. Never connect a lanyard back to itself; this creates a shear point and can cause the lanyard to fail.
4. Eliminate excess slack in the lanyard to reduce free fall and deceleration distance from the anchor point. Remember, an anchor point must be able to support 5,000 lbs per user.
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