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Hayley Osen
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Interesting read:
http://radar.oreilly.com/2012/03/five-tough-lessons-i-had-to-le.html

I take issue with a point: "Despite the disappointments I've undergone in learning about health care, I expect the system to change for the better. It has to, because the public just won't tolerate more precipitous price hikes and sub-standard care."

The system is not designed to incorporate public opinion or dissatisfaction. The hospital you go to for care is not reimbursed based on how happy you are with your results. The physician is not salaried based on whether she delivers on your expectations. Attempts at price controls have been branded as death panels, and attempts at standardization have received extreme push back from physician groups. Price hikes and variation in care are not new, so it's unlikely that there will be sudden intolerance for it.

On the other hand, I do see a big change in what providers are incentivized to document (eg, HITECH), and it's just a matter of time before more data about health care are made publicly available. I think there's tremendous potential for this information to inform consumers about quality and cost, and in turn, reward providers who deliver high value care.

Thoughts?

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It'll be interesting to see how/if this can get past the innovation or early adoption point:

http://www.economist.com/node/21548493

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http://prospect.org/article/what-real-class-warfare-looks?fb_ref=.T0E3VruIX-A.like&fb_source=home_multiline

"And let's be clear—drug testing people on unemployment doesn't save any money, or reduce drug use, or solve any practical problem. But it does what it's intended to do: Put those people in their place. So Republicans may not have gotten everything they wanted out of this bill, but at least they got the chance to stick it to some of the people they hate."

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"Coverage for contraception should be a pillar of our public health policy."

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/02/12/opinion/sunday/kristof-beyond-pelvic-politics.html?_r=1

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People should not be denied cancer screenings. Planned Parenthood provides essential services, especially for women who are uninsured and unable to get screened for cancer any other way. Seems simple, right?

http://feministing.com/2012/01/31/breaking-komen-foundation-pulls-breast-cancer-screening-funds-from-planned-parenthood/

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I think it's important to not be victim blaming about health status, especially chronic disease, where causes and management of the disease are related to so many other social, biological, environmental factors that are outside of the individual's control....but....when you become a spokesperson for a drug, I think you should take responsibility for delivering accurate health information - which includes things individuals can do to decrease their risk and have some control of their health outcomes. So her "no regrets" attitude just seems inappropriate...

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/01/18/paula-deen-diabetes_n_1212614.html
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