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Laurence Kotlikoff
Worked at Boston University,Yale University, The President's Council of Economic Advisers, UCLA
Attended University of Pennsylvania, BA
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Laurence Kotlikoff

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Ever feel like you need a translator to understand what the Social Security Administration is trying to tell you? You're not alone. As part of his new book, co-authored with Making Sen$e's Paul Solman and Phil Moeller, Social Security expert Larry Kotlikoff shows how Social Security has perfected the art of incoherence.
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Laurence Kotlikoff

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A Boston University economics professor found his firm's financial-planning software to be invaluable in negotiating his own divorce. Now he is marketing divorce-settlement analysis to others.
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Laurence Kotlikoff

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Social Security expert Larry Kotlikoff highlights a recent change in Social Security's operating manual that, while seemingly obscure, hurts millions of Americans who receive disability benefits. In effect, Kotlikoff argues, Social Security is now treating people with disabilities as second class citizens.
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Laurence Kotlikoff

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If you're one of the millions of Americans who have been married multiple times, you may be eligible to collect benefits from ex-spouses, deceased spouses and current spouses, but never at the same time, explains Social Security expert Larry Kotlikoff.
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Laurence Kotlikoff

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Just because your parents didn't live beyond a certain age, doesn't mean that you shouldn't plan on doing so, either. The assumption that you'll need more money later for retirement should guide all of your Social Security collection decisions, especially because if you take benefits too young, you may reduce the benefits available to your survivors when you do die.
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Laurence Kotlikoff

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You may be entitled to Social Security benefits on more than one account and believe that you deserve all of those benefits after you and your (ex)-spouses contributed to the Social Security system. But the reality, Larry Kotlikoff explains, is that you can only collect one benefit at a time -- whichever is highest.
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The 3 counties in Texas that opted out of SS before 1983, have given their retirees $4000/mo benefits with the residuals given to their beneficiaries upon death. All having paid the same input as those on SS.
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Laurence Kotlikoff

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Social Security expert Larry Kotlikoff recommends you retrieve your annual statement each year to check that Social Security has correctly credited your covered earnings. But don’t trust the statement’s projections of your retirement benefits or the benefits available to family members based on your work record because they're often wrong.
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Laurence Kotlikoff

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Ex-spouses can’t control what Social Security benefits their exes collect on their work records. What they want or don't want you to receive makes no difference. But there are still requirements to collecting off of an ex-spouse. Social Security expert Larry Kotilkoff tells you how it's done.
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Countries like Germany have gotten away with lecturing others about their fiscal prudence. But maybe the Germans should take a look around them, argues economist Larry Kotlikoff, to see which European Union country is doing it better.
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Laurence Kotlikoff

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Just because your parents didn't live beyond a certain age, doesn't mean that you shouldn't plan on doing so, either. The assumption that you'll need more money later for retirement should guide all of your Social Security collection decisions, especially because if you take benefits too young, you may reduce the benefits available to your survivors when you do die.
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Laurence Kotlikoff

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If you lose your high-paying job before full retirement age, you don't lose Social Security benefits you've already paid for, says expert Larry Kotlikoff. What you might miss out on, though, is an opportunity to raise your lifetime benefits even higher.
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Even if a same-sex couple is married in a state where same-sex marriage is legal, if they live in a state where it's not, and one spouse tries to collect spousal or survivor benefits, he or she will not be able to. Despite being a federal program, Social Security defers to state law when deciding who is eligible for those benefits. Larry Kotlikoff explains.
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Have him in circles
266 people
ebony jennifer's profile photo
Joan Sittenfield's profile photo
Joaquín Maldonado's profile photo
David Seideman's profile photo
Nathaniel Kynigos's profile photo
Liz Weston's profile photo
Glenn Loury's profile photo
Tom McDonough's profile photo
Ahsan Khan's profile photo
Work
Occupation
Professor of Economics
Employment
  • Boston University,Yale University, The President's Council of Economic Advisers, UCLA
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Story
Tagline
Professor of Economics, Boston University and President, Economic Security Planning, Inc.
Introduction
I teach economics at Boston University, do economic research and consulting, write professional articles and books, write columns and trade books for the public, and run my company, Economic Security Planning, Inc., which markets financial planning software at www.esplanner.com, www.esplanner.com/basic, and www.maximizemysocialsecurity.com.
Bragging rights
William Fairfield Warren Professor at Boston University, Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Fellow of the Econometric Society
Education
  • University of Pennsylvania, BA
    Economics, 1969 - 1973
  • Harvard University, PhD
    Economics, 1973 - 1977