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Kathryn Born
376 followers -
Writer, marketer and video game design instructor. Former Editor-in-Chief of Chicago Art Magazine.
Writer, marketer and video game design instructor. Former Editor-in-Chief of Chicago Art Magazine.

376 followers
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Kathryn's posts

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Wind up bird in shadow box diorama

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Tom Bishop's Chicago International Miniature Show
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om Bishop's Chicago International Miniature Show
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2nd Grade Science Fair Project: What is Virtual Reality?   "How I made this world: Use Unity 3D software. Start with an empty world. You make mountains with a  terrian paintbrush.  You paint the ground and  it moves up. "
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3D printed Barbie Sunhat. 
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Commute. Let's see if this post works

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For all my divorced friends.

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Don't write reports, Google, f#$#g fix it. Never allow an extension to install itself.

Dangerous Tools for Girls

On page 106 of The Dangerous Book for Boys, they cover the correct grammatical use of who and whom.

Doesn’t seem very dangerous to me.

What does seem downright deadly is glue guns, Exacto blades, and hot wand styrofoam cutters with a little kid. And that's just for starters. Then comes the really crazy stuff: soldering irons, drills, precious metal clay fire kilns, and resin that requires you to wear a respirator. Some people who make miniatures have tiny table saws.

The liability of a public class where children try these tools will NEVER HAPPEN, you could never mitigate risk enough. In the sample video, “Dangerous Tools for Girls: Resin”, you can see that the respirator isn’t made for a child and doesn’t really cover the mouth and nose. But we can assume some risk, and we were outside on a breezy day – (plus we just don’t do this very often, and the danger of these chemicals are about how much you exposure you have over time). So these are videos for non-public class settings. 

But the point of Dangerous Tools for Girls is about reverence for craft materials and treating yourself and the project with respect. It’s ninja style training about focus and control. With my beloved niece, Lily, we developed the slogan, “I promise I won’t cut off your fingers, if you promise not to cut off my fingers” – I mean, someone had to hold it steady while the other one chopped or poked… (I don’t even remember the projects, but that saying came up an awful lot, and Lily has incredibly steady hands, even at age 4). If you can work carefully with advanced materials, it opens a universe of crafting, personal responsibility and teamwork.

Future episodes:  glue gun, exacto knives, hammers & saws, needles, breaking plates, styrofoam heat-wand carving, soldering…

(this post will be seen in full, with video, when Unit Z is launched.)
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