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Scott Worley
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Scott Worley

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This is NOT real git documentation! Read carefully, and click the button to generate a new man page. man page generator. Permalink; Generate new man page. Name. Synopsis. Description. Options. See also. Created by Lokaltog - GitHub repo. Inspired by InconsolableCellist's Markov Chain-based ...
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Turning humans with a control moment gyroscope backpack.
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I think that this article does a good job of describing what the world will look like once (once, not if) autonomous cars have taken over completely, and the many ways in which this will make all of our lives a lot better. (Saved lives, saved time, less pollution, less cost to each of us individually, etc) However, I think he grossly overestimates the speed of the transition: by 2025 I'd expect to see large-scale experiments rolling out, but I wouldn't expect to reach the final equilibrium point he's describing until 2050 at the soonest.

I think that he also underestimates the violence with which these changes will be resisted. As he points out, several existing industries are likely to be cratered, most notably car manufacture (autonomous cars serving people on-demand could be active 95% of the time, versus 4% of the time for passenger cars today; that's a 24x reduction in the number of cars needed per person) and professional drivers. We're already seeing tremendous resistance by vested interests in the existing taxi business to even ordinary competition like Uber; what will happen when it starts to become clear to them that the entire business is about to go away, never to return? 

In this regard, I think that we can draw useful lessons from the collapse of the longshoreman industry with the rise of containerized shipping. On the US' West Coast, strong longshore unions negotiated a phased shutdown with shipping companies; on the East Coast, weak unions spent more time fighting and undercutting each other than negotiating, and the net result was a serious collapse of all shipping to those ports, with the longshoremen bearing the brunt of it. Marc Levinson's book The Box has an interesting discussion of this. I suspect that similar phenomena will be seen here.

But even more so than with the transition to containerized shipping, the transition to autonomous vehicles is likely inevitable: the advantages are too large and too widespread, and the disadvantages too limited, for groups to successfully be able to prevent it for their own interest.
I have spent quite a bit of time lately thinking about autonomous cars, and I wanted to summarize my current thoughts and predictions. Most people - experts included - seem to think that the transi...
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Zunger's comments seem vastly more intelligent than the original blog post. 
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Research Priorities for Robust and Beneficial Artificial Intelligence: an Open Letter
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Matt Dorfman We live in a world made of computers. Your car is a computer that drives down the freeway at 60 mph with you strapped inside. If you live or work in a modern building, computers regulate its temperature and respiration. And we're not just putting our bodies inside computers—we're also putting computers inside…
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Have them in circles
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We'll go to the doctor when we feel flu-ish or a nagging pain. So why don’t we see a health professional when we feel emotional pain: guilt, loss, loneliness? Too many of us deal with common psychological-health issues on our own, says Guy Winch. But we don’t have to. He makes a compelling case to practice emotional hygiene — taking care of our emotions, our minds, with the same diligence we take care of our bodies.
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Who really owns your drones? Responses to the White House crash reflect a scary shift in the idea of "ownership."
If there's anything creepier than a drone flying up to your home and peering through your window, it's the thought of your technology—your cellphone, laptop camera, car radio, or even an implanted medical device—being turned on you for an even more intimate view of your private life. But the reaction last week to a drunken government intelligence agent borrowing his buddy's drone and crashing it into the White House lawn is a reminder that shorts...
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The topic everyone in the world should be talking about.
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Fantastic interactive story that shows how even slight preferences for being in the majority leads to segregation.

I'd been looking for something similar to this to post; I had found the result fascinating ever since I learned of it when working with some NetLogo models years ago.
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Have them in circles
85 people
zara de candole's profile photo
Ben Bashford's profile photo
Marshall Bjerke's profile photo
Matthew Wilson's profile photo
Adam Kramer's profile photo
Johann Rocholl's profile photo
Michael Smith's profile photo
Olivier Beyssac's profile photo
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