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Alex Wild
Works at Alex Wild Photography
Attended University of California, Davis
Lived in Fairport, NY
34,302 followers|3,227,740 views
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Alex Wild

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If I had to pick a favorite army ant, it'd probably be the tank-like Nomamyrmex , a small genus of brutish ants found from south Texas to northern Argentina. These heavily armored ants are specialist predators of other large, well-defended ants. Here, a worker N. esenbeckii carries a vanquished major worker of a Pheidole. Monte Verde, Minas Gerais, Brazil.
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Very nice
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Alex Wild

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She is so much larger.
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Alex Wild

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Although they may not look it, these Colobopsis impressus ants from Florida are sisters. The larger ant at left has a blocky, cork-like head used to plug the nest entrance and prevent unwanted intruders, while the smaller individual is a regular worker. Whether young ant larvae develop into one or the other form is not genetic but depends on the environmental signals they receive as they grow.
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+Natalie Chistyakova I told you. There he is. Hello Alex Wild. I saw your profile & told Natalie because she's an Entomologist.
Me, I'm just a crazy poet. Maybe I'll write something about ants & bugs now.
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Alex Wild

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Most people think of cockroaches as pests, but only 4 of the 4,000 species (that's 0.1%) are truly pesty in their persistent association with human dwellings. The vast majority require natural habitats and would not survive indoors, or even in towns. Some, like this Australian woodland species, are quite pretty.
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Well said. ++
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What better for a Friday afternoon than a pleasing fungus beetle?
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Fungus FEMALE BEETLE.
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Alex Wild

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Texas doesn't have a state beetle, but if it did it'd probably be Onthophagus taurus.
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I doubt that Texas would choose an immigrant for its state beetle.
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Alex Wild

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We still have a few spaces left for our upcoming insect photography workshop on coastal Georgia's beautiful Sapelo Island:

http://www.eventbee.com/v/bugshot/event?eid=132216901

And, did I mention that lodging for this workshop is in a mansion on the ocean? Well. Now I did. I'm really looking forward to this one.
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Beautiful photo !
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Ever wondered what happened to the iconic landscape in Microsoft's famous computer backdrop?
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That image is ... wait for it ... wait for it ...

In the cloud now!
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Portrait of an Australian acrobat ant. This genus, Crematogaster, is one of a small number of ant genera I recommend all entomologists learn to identify. Acrobat ants are abundant in most places around the world, so there is some utility in being able to pick them out, and their distinctive heart-shaped abdomens are an easy trait to identify.
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They call them acrobat ants because they can turn their abdomen all the way over their head like a scoprion to sting anything attacking them. They're too small to sting humans
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Alex Wild

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Look at meeeeee, everyone! I'm a fleeeeeeeeeea!!!!  

(Photographed at Empire Mine State Park, California, on a deer carcass)
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That's a real macro!
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Work
Occupation
Entomologist
Employment
  • Alex Wild Photography
    Freelance Photography & Writing, 2005 - present
  • Scientific American
    Photography Blogger, 2011 - present
  • University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
    Research Scholar, 2008 - 2012
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Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Previously
Fairport, NY - Brunswick, ME - Asunción, Paraguay - Davis, CA - Tucson, AZ - Urbana, IL
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Tagline
Entomologist & Photographer
Introduction
Alex Wild is an Illinois-based entomologist who studies the evolutionary history of ants. In 2003 he founded a photography business as an aesthetic complement to his scientific work, and his natural history photographs appear in numerous museums, books, and media outlets. 
Education
  • University of California, Davis
    Ph.D. Entomology, 1999 - 2005
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Other names
Myrmecos