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Jay Gischer
Lives in Mountain View, CA
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Jay Gischer

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Some good data on job migration.  The job migration due to firm migration from CA to TX is roughly 0.1% of total employment of those states.  So kind of not a big deal.

But the bigger stretch, to my mind, comes from attributing this very small migration to lower taxes and regulations.   I have a friend who's been telling me about a major firm that's moving an IT department to CO (not TX, but still...).  It's because of costs - both labor costs and property costs.  Costs due to taxes and regulations are going to be dwarfed by these costs, as well.
Are Firms Really Leaving California and Moving to Texas?
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 It might be true, I don't know.  SF, the city, is notoriously anti-development. But SF is not CA, not remotely. If businesses wanted to escape SF, they could move to Sacramento, or Stockton.  They are pretty conservative and pro-business in Stockton.

Oh, and why would you believe something that Steve Jobs said?  The man was legendary for his "reality distortion field".

I think there's a layer of bullshit on the part of business leaders, who are negotiating for the best possible deal with city and state officials.  They will distort and magnify the tiniest differences just to get some bargaining leverage.
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Wistful and bittersweet.  Worth reading, even though it assumes that "a programmer" is male.  Well, her programmer was male, anyway.

She describes, from the outside, the anxiety that I still feel when programming: I'm not doing it fast enough, I need to spend more time, get more done.  She ties this to masculinity.  I'm not sure about that.  It might be true.  It certainly has to do with status, I guess.  But it also has to do with the frustration that happens when things that seem simple, that ought to be simple, aren't.

I think that some of the women who are programmers that I have known have felt this as well.  I don't know that it's the same, though.
"When you love a programmer, you must to learn to love the back of his head. He will be forever bent away from you towards a small black window."
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On reflection, the interactions of this piece have more to do with an extrovert being paired with an introvert than with someone in advertising being paired with a programmer.
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"[Stewart] got incredibly defensive. I remember he was like, 'What are you trying to say? There's a tone in your voice.'

"I was like, 'There's no tone. It bothered me. It sounded like Kingfish [a minstrel-like Amos 'n' Andy character].'

"And then he got upset. And he stood up and he was just like, 'F*** off. I'm done with you.' And he just started screaming that to me. And he screamed it a few times. 'F*** off! I'm done with you.' And he stormed out. And I didn't know if I had been fired."

Another response for Stewart might have been "Well, that sucks.  I'm sorry."  He might have even said, "Well, how could I do it better?  Any suggestions?"  Why didn't he give that one? 

My guess is because of the shame we white people all feel about such topics.  It's a lot.  It isn't the fault of black people, it just happens to be associated with them.   This is our way forward - to confront that shame within ourselves and dissipate it.  This will allow us to then examine behaviors that may have a racial impact and dispassionately seek better alternatives.
Wyatt Cenac's much-publicized confrontation with Jon Stewart says a lot about the pitfalls of being The Only One In The Room. But turns out there's some interesting social science behind it, too.
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This piece is good for it's parsing of the encounter in detail, and from the following framework:

We all deserve more than legal policing. We deserve good policing.
As the video of Sandra Bland’s arrest makes its way into homes and offices around the country, people are aghast that the failure to use a turn signal led to a woman’s arrest and, ultimately, her death by what officials have identified as suicide. People want to know if the officer’s actions—asking that Bland put out her cigarette and demanding that she step out of her car—were legal. But that’s the wrong question. Instead, we should be asking wh...
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My addition is for Ruby.  I dub it a Mercedes M-Class SUV.  It's sort of in the same space as Python, without some of the (ahem, whitespace!) dumb engineering choices.  It works really well, it's incredibly reliable, and nobody knows it exists.
 
This is funny, though it doesn't mention SQL. Fortunately ...
C was the great all-arounder: compact, powerful, goes everywhere, and reliable in situations where your life depends on it. C++ is the new C — twice the power, twice the size, works in hostile environments, and if you try to use it without care and special training you will probably crash.
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I thought original Land Rover Defender for C, rather than a Jeep. It can do anything at all, but the strange driving position will leave you bruised all down one side.
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Kevin Drum, responding to the agenda of Black Lives Matter:

At the risk of being yet another clueless white guy, I'd be curious to know how this translates into concrete initiatives. In the case of presidential candidates, the options are legislation, executive actions, more active enforcement of existing laws, and the bully pulpit.

I'm a white guy, and I'm often clueless, but on this I have a clue.  I like the agenda of Black Lives Matter.  I endorse it.  However, it makes me feel pretty damn helpless, and white people, especially white males, aren't supposed to admit to that in public.  

That's how a lot of this racial stuff lands on me.  Since I was a kid, in about 1966, I've endorsed the Civil Rights struggle, and the vision of Dr. King.  And there's a lot of crap that I didn't want then, and I don't want now that's still around.  I even sometimes make a stupid assumption based on race.  I do my best to fix it, but this whole thing seems like a very long, tough slog.  

It's a mild comfort to me to realize that nobody in human history has attempted anything like this.  Of course, that's because there were few instances of slavery so toxic and noxious as the American Slave Power.  

That said, I think that if I belonged to Black Lives Matter, I'd kind of feel like it might be the politicians job to come up with some policy initiatives and political talking points to support them that addressed my agenda.  That's what politicians do, right?  Show the voters they give a damn.

If I were a black voter, or better, an organization of black voters, the place where I'd figure I would have impact would be the Democratic primary.  Because nobody would believe that black voters would vote for the Republican nominee.

So, some of these are hard, and some not so hard.  Politicians, do some politics.
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Jay Gischer

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This piece is rather confused by the injection of an evo-psych claim that bullying is inherent.  This claim is held in opposition to the idea that all bullies are maladapted.

Honestly, I think I'm willing to accept the idea of "pure bullies", who rate higher at most life satisfaction indices.  Is this behavior - bullying behavior - inborn?  Probably not.  Look at this:

Meanwhile, separate research Volk is working on offers more evidence bolstering the concept: the bullies among 178 teenagers surveyed by the professor and his colleagues got more sex than everyone else.

Bullying definitely wasn't what we thought it was, and the "pure bullies" might well be inborn with a higher drive for status and sex - this translates to more testosterone, by the way, in both males and females when normalized for their gender.  And they discover a behavior that brings them lots of the rewards that they value, so they engage in it more.

In fact, this explains a lot of the internet bullying - not that I think it leads to more sex, per se, but it definitely leads to approval and status.  You get lots of "likes" and page-views for your tale of punishment of some wrong-doer, whether or not their wrong was substantive or not doesn't matter.  Just that you did it in support of some cause or another.

In the video, Prof. Volk makes some other good points:  bullies are really good at not being caught.  They are expert in picking the right time, place, and victim.  This matches up with my experience well.
The motivation behind bullying. One reason: More sex.
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+Jay Gischer​ Let me know next time you're in the neighborhood. I'd be up for coffee or somesuch.
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I had these stereotypical alien abduction experiences when I was a kid,” Guy Malone tells me. “Little creatures with big black eyes were raping me and trying to eat me and trying to operate on me.”

Malone now thinks that these memories were injected into him by demons, agents of Satan.  My best guess at what happened is that he was abused and raped as a small chiild, and has dissociated the whole thing.  This is not my original theory, I first came across it in The Stranger in the Mirror by Marlene Steinberg.

Of course, this is a story nobody wants to tell.
The aliens are a nice change from the flat, never-ending drive from the North. As I pull into the town’s dusty, stretching main street, I notice a spacecraft on the sign for a credit union, and even the street lamps downtown have wide, bulging black eyes. Little green humanoid critters glitter toward me from both sides of the road.
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Or, it may have been just wild imagination of a child frightened by creepy UFO fans.

(Before the collapse of the USSR, there was a brief boom of "newly released secrets" and "arcane knowledge" and "UFO stories".  I recall having a few nightmares after listening to abduction stories on magnetic tape when I was six or seven.  A kid growing up in an "UFO capital" would have a harder time getting distracted from this kind of scary stories, and their recurrence might leave a stronger imprint.)
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The move comes after Google said last week it will phase out Google+’s photo-storing feature and replace it with the recently introduced Google Photos. We noted in the spring that the social network was splitting into pieces. Another notable breakup is one that happened last year, when Google dumped the requirement of signing up for Google+ when creating a Gmail account.

...

So do the latest moves mean Google+ is dead? The company is insisting it’s not. In his post today, Horowitz acknowledged that “we made a few choices that, in hindsight, we’ve needed to rethink.” But in referring to the unbundling that’s going on now, he wrote: “We think changes like these will lead to a more focused, more useful, more engaging Google+.”

When this goes in, I'll probably start sharing more YouTube videos (again).  Y'all will have to judge for yourself if that makes it more engaging.  But overall, probably yes.  The comment leak to YouTube made things difficult.  It's a good example of context collapse.  

I can say things here because there's an expectation of who my followers are, and there's no such thing on YouTube.
Breaking up is hard to do, but apparently it's something Google is finding to be necessary after the forced marriages of its services. The company announced today it will no longer require users to have a Google+ account in order to use the company's other offerings.
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Ok, the title alarms me a bit, but then she explains:

By the way, I’m not arguing that gender differences are innate. Innateness doesn’t matter for the purposes of this discussion. After all, businesses don’t debate whether the differences between Chinese and American employees are innate. They know that to work with and for the Chinese requires learning their language and culture. Working across genders is similar.

Ok, so what are the differences?  She doesn't say, actually.  She just says that treating them the same holds them back.  As an example, she describes the situation of boys in schools, where 90% of the teachers are women:

When the roles are flipped – when females form the dominant group – ignorance about differences also hurts males. This is the argument of Michael Thompson [...]. In a speech last week at the Chautauqua Institution, he argued that because eight out of nine U.S. teachers today are women, schools today judge boys learning styles subpar because they deviate from the norm set by girls and women. Instead of adapting to boys’ differences (“more physical energy, developmentally less mature, use language differently,” as he put it), we insist that both genders behave the same, and medicate our sons to calm them down.

As it turns out, none of the male differences in school applied to me, and I did well.  As predicted, I suppose.  I'm all for valuing differences, but it would be nice if she tried to articulate what those differences were, and how they might be addressed.

The only conclusion she draws is that top management needs to be committed to doing something.  But that something is, she doesn't say.  I think this is maybe an advertisement for her consulting business.  And when she says that senior teams must be "equipped to lead", she means that they should hire her to train them, and she's not going to spill the beans without getting paid.

Yes, this piece tried my patience a bit.
It’s time to stop pretending everyone’s the same.
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Pretty cool.
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I think the stats on "one time abusers" is very interesting and says a lot about perhaps what's going on in other communities as well. 
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Productivity is calculated as output divided by hours worked.  But how are hours worked calculated for salaried employees?  If it's normed to a set number of hours, be that 40 or 50 or (ugh!)60, then that explains why productivity is falling now.

After the crash of 2008, most of the people I knew were working crazy hours.  This change did not show up in their pay, they were running scared, worried about being laid off/outsourced.

This is not the case now.  Employees are much in demand, and while they may still work longer than 40 hours/week, they aren't running scared, and they're probably taking more time for themselves.
“There is a lack of appreciation for what's happening in Silicon Valley because we don't have a good way to measure it.” — Hal Varian, Google's chief economist, on the worries about low U.S. productivity. The Wall Street Journal notes that Varian and others in the tech industry aren't too keen ...
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I'm a software developer by day, 3000-year-old redheaded elf by night.  Born in Blaine, I surprised many in Lynden by my success.  You can tell I live in Silicon Valley, because I know what "Sunnytoga-DeAnzavale Road" refers to.
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