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Jay Gischer
Lives in Mountain View, CA
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Jay Gischer

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At least once a week, I eat at a restaurant/diner where they speak Spanish behind the counter, and have Spanish-language television running, and play Spanish pop music on the PA. It doesn't bother me. I like it.  I don't think that Futbol Picante has an adequate translation into English.  (Yes, I know what it means.  That's not what I mean.)

But that's because, I think, I've been going there for years, I've learned a little Spanish, they can take my order in English, and in fact have my order memorized.

My favorite contractor, who's done several small jobs and two bathroom remodels for me, is Mexican-American. He speaks English with a very strong accent, and still is one of the best communicators I've ever run across among contractors. He always takes great pains to let us know what he's going to do, when he's going to do it, and why. And when he's working, he speaks Spanish to his employee(s). It doesn't bother me, because I trust him.

My point is, this takes some getting used to, and it takes the patient construction of an "us". I think those of us who have walked this path should speak up about it.
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Spanish, post Louisiana Purchase,  has always been a language of the United States, just as French has.

I'm functional in French (after a week or so in contact with French speakers - it was a long time ago) and speak Spanish with some fluency.

How one can expect to do business and be successful in just one language in the Western hemisphere is beyond me.

Drum is slightly off target, though. It's Spanish speaking culture that drives people off the rails with fear. The idea that things might change to the point that they would not be able to function as they once did is underneath it. (This fear is not exclusive to white folk, either.)
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The blogger here is a personal friend of mine.  Just so you know.
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This seems an interesting development.
Ferguson Oath Keepers are planning an open-carry march with armed, black, non-members of the group in a show of support and solidarity.
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I can't disagree with this statement strongly enough:

"When protesters are out in force, and the police don’t respect their right to demonstrate, open carry levels the playing field and keeps the police from engaging in reckless brutality and unprovoked violence."
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A really great step.
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It would make a beautiful gamer cake. Good point!
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Jay Gischer

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Among the key findings: only 19 percent of the tech workers surveyed said they were happy on the job; just 36 percent of tech workers say they see a clear promotion and career path, compared with 50 percent for non-tech employees; only 17 percent of tech workers say they feel valued at work; only 28 percent of tech workers know their company’s vision, compared with 43 percent for non-tech employees; just 47 percent of tech workers say they have a good relationship with their co-workers, compared with 56 percent for non-tech employees.
In many ways it's a boom like no other. Tech workers in Santa Clara County are seeing their wages grow more than twice as fast as the wages of all other employees in the region. The surge in tech hiring has made Santa Clara County the strongest job market in the nation, and the San Francisco-San ...
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It makes sense, in that the average non-tech worker is going to be nearly as valuable as the 90th percentile non-tech worker, but the average tech worker is much less valuable than the 90th percentile non-tech worker. So we should expect that the average tech worker is under some competitive pressure and strain. Also, the appeal of the tech sector draws in workers who may not be well suited for it, but choose it because the other choices are less appealing, which further reduces the value and contributions of the average tech worker.
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Jay Gischer

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This is a bit more polemical than I like, but I appreciate some data about the minimum-wage hike in Seattle.  Well, properly, this data doesn't mean much.

I'm really uncertain whether or not the minimum-wage hike will have a net beneficial effect.  I think it's plausible, a priori, that it might drive out marginal businesses and jobs.  And it's also plausible that it might boost the economy of Seattle (and SeaTac airport) by means of something called "the velocity theory of money" which was advanced by that noted liberal Milton Friedman.

Anyway, we don't have much truly relevant data on the situation.  Don't let anyone say different.
@TBPInvictus here. Earlier this month, AEI scholar Mark Perry was spotted using a dubious metric regarding minimum wage. Given the point his ideology
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I couldn't stop, either.
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I LOL'd at the "Thanks Obama" review.
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Cheryl Burns, 60, was on a road trip from California when she heard that Trump would be in Alabama. She turned her car around and got in line, warning people of what happened to states when liberals took them over.

“There is no more California,” Burns said. “It’s now international, lawless territory. Everything is up for grabs. Illegal aliens are murdering people there. People are being raped. Trump isn’t lying about anything — the rest of the country just hasn’t found out yet.”

Wow.  Everything is up for grabs?  I call dibs on Tesla.

It's hard to make out what Ms. Burns is talking about.  Perhaps she's talking about the fact that every day of my life here in the Bay Area has quite a few Mexican-Americans in them.  I see signs in Spanish.  Sometimes they speak Spanish behind the counter and have Spanish television on in the diner.  I like watching Futbol Picante when I go in there.  I also see Chinese and some Filipino and a few Japanese.  I see lots of people from India and the occasional Sikh, like the last airport shuttle driver.  Is this what she means by "up for grabs?"

I met a woman like that once.  She came to my Tai Chi class, which was taught by a man who came here from China at about age 10.  She complained about all the foreigners in line at the welfare office.  I just kind of stared at her blankly.

There are rapes, of course, but the hundreds of non-white people I see every day probably aren't the ones doing them.  Not any more than the white people are.
The GOP presidential front-runner addressed one of the largest crowds of the 2016 campaign Friday night, but his flashy performance in Alabama was about more than just showmanship.
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Joel Webber's profile photoSteven Johnson's profile photoMatt Harmon's profile photoRandall Tice's profile photo
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+Matt Harmon I got your half gallon jug here.  Try not to spill any of what's left of California water.   =D
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This blog post, written by Laura J. Mixon won a Hugo for Best Fan Writer.

At her speech accepting the award, Mixon said, "There's room for all of us here.  But there's no middle ground between 'We belong here' and 'No, you don't' ... I stand with people from marginalized groups who seek simply to be seen as fully human.  Black lives matter.'

Source: http://www.wired.com/2015/08/won-science-fictions-hugo-awards-matters/

Her post was about an individual - an online bully.
From the beginning of my investigation, I have felt reluctant to drag up the specifics from individual cases of BS/RH's online assaults. My primary goal with this effort is to reveal the truth while minimizing harm, and allow people a safe space to heal and tell their stories.
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I'm frequently a voice for tolerance and civility, which is what this piece is.

However, here the author frames this in terms of the traditional gender system:

But are we actually at a point where our principles allow us to cheer wildly at the sight of a rude and ungallant businessman referring to a woman as a “dog” just because that woman has said vile and repulsive things herself? As anti-porn activist Matt Fradd has noted, it is a manly thing to treat a woman with dignity, even if she has forgotten hers.

Rudeness is considered "ungallant" and not "manly".  Or here, he quotes Eric Metaxas:

Donald Trump's despicable comments about Megyn Kelly are God's mercy toward the U.S. We've been allowed to see the madness of Saul in time to reject him. If anything has ever illustrated our debased view of manhood…Donald Trump is it. He is not gentlemanly or chivalrous or heroic.

The reference to "Saul" is to a figure in the Old Testament, who is the bad king that David, being the "good king", succeeds.

I think that everybody should be treated well.  I do not understand this as "manly" or "chivalrous".  I understand it as "compassionate" and "strong".  These are qualities that all human beings can have.

Oppressed groups are going to be angry.  They are going to express that anger.  Sometimes that expression is very toxic.  It doesn't mean we need to respond in anger, though.

But DonaldTrump's appeal, in my opinion, is based on "more suffering for my enemies".  If he's making you wince and tear your hair out, the likelihood is that that's exactly what his fans enjoy about him.

Nasty remarks garner lots of attention, and lots of approval from others who don't like the person the nasty remark is thrown at.
Donald Trump is to presidential politics what Family Guy is to cartoons.
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Obviously every politician is an actor to some extent. But I do think that Donald Trump or Chris Christie are more "real" than Scott Walker or Marco Rubio. Walker has recently changed his rhetoric on immigration because Trump is getting traction on that issue. I don't think you would see the reverse, Trump changing how he talks about the issue because Walker is getting traction.
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Shout it to the rooftops.

The “entity orientation” that says “You are smart or not, end of story,” leads to bad outcomes—a result that has been confirmed by many other studies.

This is at the core of racial and gender differences in math.  And lots of other things.  It is also the source of stereotypes about people who like math and are good at it.
Basic ability in the subject isn't the product of good genes, but hard work.
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When I was in high school I became convinced I was bad at math because it required some study for me to do it.  Then I applied myself and it turns out I'm just fine at it.
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I'm a software developer by day, 3000-year-old redheaded elf by night.  Born in Blaine, I surprised many in Lynden by my success.  You can tell I live in Silicon Valley, because I know what "Sunnytoga-DeAnzavale Road" refers to.
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