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Jay Gischer
Lives in Mountain View, CA
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Jay Gischer

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The move comes after Google said last week it will phase out Google+’s photo-storing feature and replace it with the recently introduced Google Photos. We noted in the spring that the social network was splitting into pieces. Another notable breakup is one that happened last year, when Google dumped the requirement of signing up for Google+ when creating a Gmail account.

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So do the latest moves mean Google+ is dead? The company is insisting it’s not. In his post today, Horowitz acknowledged that “we made a few choices that, in hindsight, we’ve needed to rethink.” But in referring to the unbundling that’s going on now, he wrote: “We think changes like these will lead to a more focused, more useful, more engaging Google+.”

When this goes in, I'll probably start sharing more YouTube videos (again).  Y'all will have to judge for yourself if that makes it more engaging.  But overall, probably yes.  The comment leak to YouTube made things difficult.  It's a good example of context collapse.  

I can say things here because there's an expectation of who my followers are, and there's no such thing on YouTube.
Breaking up is hard to do, but apparently it's something Google is finding to be necessary after the forced marriages of its services. The company announced today it will no longer require users to have a Google+ account in order to use the company's other offerings.
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Jay Gischer

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This piece is good for it's parsing of the encounter in detail, and from the following framework:

We all deserve more than legal policing. We deserve good policing.
As the video of Sandra Bland’s arrest makes its way into homes and offices around the country, people are aghast that the failure to use a turn signal led to a woman’s arrest and, ultimately, her death by what officials have identified as suicide. People want to know if the officer’s actions—asking that Bland put out her cigarette and demanding that she step out of her car—were legal. But that’s the wrong question. Instead, we should be asking wh...
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My addition is for Ruby.  I dub it a Mercedes M-Class SUV.  It's sort of in the same space as Python, without some of the (ahem, whitespace!) dumb engineering choices.  It works really well, it's incredibly reliable, and nobody knows it exists.
 
This is funny, though it doesn't mention SQL. Fortunately ...
C was the great all-arounder: compact, powerful, goes everywhere, and reliable in situations where your life depends on it. C++ is the new C — twice the power, twice the size, works in hostile environments, and if you try to use it without care and special training you will probably crash.
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I thought original Land Rover Defender for C, rather than a Jeep. It can do anything at all, but the strange driving position will leave you bruised all down one side.
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Productivity is calculated as output divided by hours worked.  But how are hours worked calculated for salaried employees?  If it's normed to a set number of hours, be that 40 or 50 or (ugh!)60, then that explains why productivity is falling now.

After the crash of 2008, most of the people I knew were working crazy hours.  This change did not show up in their pay, they were running scared, worried about being laid off/outsourced.

This is not the case now.  Employees are much in demand, and while they may still work longer than 40 hours/week, they aren't running scared, and they're probably taking more time for themselves.
“There is a lack of appreciation for what's happening in Silicon Valley because we don't have a good way to measure it.” — Hal Varian, Google's chief economist, on the worries about low U.S. productivity. The Wall Street Journal notes that Varian and others in the tech industry aren't too keen ...
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When the ads for Game of War started showing up on my students’ phones last year—they haven’t stopped—many were annoyed. They hated that it was impossible to close the ad, forcing them instead to watch the video until the end. But what really irritated them was Ms. Upton, in a full-cleavage-baring white flowing dress. The ads are clearly effective for some, but the message is obvious: Game of War is a boys’ game, and Upton is the game’s mascot, walking through battles totally unscathed and doing nothing except looking pretty.

I know ads like that annoy the crap out of me.  Not just because they are sexist, but they're kind of demeaning to me.  You know, they just kind of want to jerk me around by my hormones, and don't tell me anything about, you know, what the game is like.

I knew a young man once, maybe 13 years old, who was watching TV when yet another ad for something which features a scantily clad 20-ish woman came on.  He exclaimed, "Why do they DO that?"  He also loved playing Perfect Dark, which had a female protagonist.
Here's what they really think about how women are portrayed on screen
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"Your kingdom awaits, milord."

Those ads, ugh.
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This one's for +Kit Gischer.  You're welcome.
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The lead singer goes by the stage name "Ladybeard" if you want to know more about that fascinating character. :)
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Ok, the title alarms me a bit, but then she explains:

By the way, I’m not arguing that gender differences are innate. Innateness doesn’t matter for the purposes of this discussion. After all, businesses don’t debate whether the differences between Chinese and American employees are innate. They know that to work with and for the Chinese requires learning their language and culture. Working across genders is similar.

Ok, so what are the differences?  She doesn't say, actually.  She just says that treating them the same holds them back.  As an example, she describes the situation of boys in schools, where 90% of the teachers are women:

When the roles are flipped – when females form the dominant group – ignorance about differences also hurts males. This is the argument of Michael Thompson [...]. In a speech last week at the Chautauqua Institution, he argued that because eight out of nine U.S. teachers today are women, schools today judge boys learning styles subpar because they deviate from the norm set by girls and women. Instead of adapting to boys’ differences (“more physical energy, developmentally less mature, use language differently,” as he put it), we insist that both genders behave the same, and medicate our sons to calm them down.

As it turns out, none of the male differences in school applied to me, and I did well.  As predicted, I suppose.  I'm all for valuing differences, but it would be nice if she tried to articulate what those differences were, and how they might be addressed.

The only conclusion she draws is that top management needs to be committed to doing something.  But that something is, she doesn't say.  I think this is maybe an advertisement for her consulting business.  And when she says that senior teams must be "equipped to lead", she means that they should hire her to train them, and she's not going to spill the beans without getting paid.

Yes, this piece tried my patience a bit.
It’s time to stop pretending everyone’s the same.
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Pretty cool.
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I think the stats on "one time abusers" is very interesting and says a lot about perhaps what's going on in other communities as well. 
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Kevin Drum, responding to the agenda of Black Lives Matter:

At the risk of being yet another clueless white guy, I'd be curious to know how this translates into concrete initiatives. In the case of presidential candidates, the options are legislation, executive actions, more active enforcement of existing laws, and the bully pulpit.

I'm a white guy, and I'm often clueless, but on this I have a clue.  I like the agenda of Black Lives Matter.  I endorse it.  However, it makes me feel pretty damn helpless, and white people, especially white males, aren't supposed to admit to that in public.  

That's how a lot of this racial stuff lands on me.  Since I was a kid, in about 1966, I've endorsed the Civil Rights struggle, and the vision of Dr. King.  And there's a lot of crap that I didn't want then, and I don't want now that's still around.  I even sometimes make a stupid assumption based on race.  I do my best to fix it, but this whole thing seems like a very long, tough slog.  

It's a mild comfort to me to realize that nobody in human history has attempted anything like this.  Of course, that's because there were few instances of slavery so toxic and noxious as the American Slave Power.  

That said, I think that if I belonged to Black Lives Matter, I'd kind of feel like it might be the politicians job to come up with some policy initiatives and political talking points to support them that addressed my agenda.  That's what politicians do, right?  Show the voters they give a damn.

If I were a black voter, or better, an organization of black voters, the place where I'd figure I would have impact would be the Democratic primary.  Because nobody would believe that black voters would vote for the Republican nominee.

So, some of these are hard, and some not so hard.  Politicians, do some politics.
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Well, after this, a wolverine as a pet seems almost reasonable.
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What, it's just Raffy meeting the family. 8)
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Neil Young is unhappy with the quality of sound produced by streaming.  I don't use streaming services, so I'm clueless.  They use a highly-compressed, lossy format to stream?  I guess?

Otherwise, in a digital world, sounds would be transmitted with no loss at all.  But some of the veterans in the music world cough*Barbra Streisand*cough have an aversion to the sound of anything digital.  This isn't completely crazy, it does sound different, and a bit harsher, but it doesn't get to "worse than AM radio".  AM radio sucked.

So what's Neil on about?
As everyone knows, if anybody knows nowhere, it's rock rebel Neil Young, and nowhere is where his future music streaming activities are going to reside. Disgusted with what he says is the butchering of his work product by the digital wonders of streaming, Young has announced to the world that as ...
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Streaming usually has hard limits on latency, and can drop frames to prevent skips.
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This is really kind of awesome.  Great source material for, say, Deadlands.
TRUCKEE, Calif. — Western stagecoach companies were big business in the latter half of the 19th century. In addition to passengers and freight, stages hauled gold and silver bullion
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I loved the bit about her expertise with whips.  It's a lost art now.
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I'm a software developer by day, 3000-year-old redheaded elf by night.  Born in Blaine, I surprised many in Lynden by my success.  You can tell I live in Silicon Valley, because I know what "Sunnytoga-DeAnzavale Road" refers to.
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