Profile

Cover photo
Jay Gischer
Lives in Mountain View, CA
654,484 views
AboutPostsPhotosVideos

Stream

Jay Gischer

Shared publicly  - 
 
Before my speech, I had been speaking to a lot of current and retired police officers. Given all of the awful headlines news, they were concerned about an increase in violence generally and violence directed at cops specifically. They were quite surprised that while the headlines were screaming one thing, the data were saying something very different. Not only has violent crime been in decline, but the number of police fatalities also has been falling steadily for decades;data reveal that the past eight years has seen record-low numbers of officers killed in action (assaults on officers are down as well).

I blame media disintermediation, which creates the "race for clicks". Posts about how things are getting better don't really generate the traffic the way a good shooting does.

I don't want to go back to the old days. The point-to-point nature of the Internet makes some amazing things possible. However, we need something more - something to get our feet back on the ground.

I would compare our time to the 1890's - the days of "yellow journalism". What pulled us out of that? Maybe we'll just get better at ignoring the crap? There are signs of that.
Source: NYPD Now that the political conventions are in full throat and the silly season has started, I thought it might be time for a reminder about reality. In particular, the use and abuse of statistics, and the many ways people ignore data. I was reminded of this last week in Missouri at…Read More
9
Andres Soolo's profile photoJohn Wehrle's profile photoJay Gischer's profile photoSteven Flaeck's profile photo
6 comments
 
I tend to think that media fragmentation should lead to less consumption of crime coverage because there are more preferred options.
Add a comment...

Jay Gischer

Shared publicly  - 
 
This is such a good piece (via +Andreas Schou )

I'm just going to focus on one part of it, near the end, though I have a dozen remarks in my head.

This conclusion—widely shared—is a product of insulated discourse. I am not saying “open the floodgates, let in the shitty male trolls!” I know the trolls—they have tried to be my friends, they have tried to sneak into feminist spaces with no desire to learn or listen. I understand not trusting men who loudly and constantly hold forth on women’s issues and refuse to accept when they are mistaken. I’m not encouraging anyone to trust blindly. I am pleading to the discoursers: consider that this insulation has effects and try to mitigate them, if your priority really is finding truth amid a muck of concealed patriarchal lies. Check to see if maybe you are saying things and reproducing things mostly because it sounds good and feels good and nobody is challenging them.

I think Jennifer hits the nail on the head when she invokes "insulated discourse". Some of my older feminist ciswoman friends now say, "everyone's a perpetrator', and are no longer excluding cismales from their activities. They have switched to being purpose-driven, rather than identity-driven, and I think this is a very good thing.

It seems to me that any struggle against a system of oppression requires a separatist phase, granting time and space to get clear of a bunch of assumptions and understand what's been done to you.

But ultimately, if you're going to have an impact, you have to turn around, go back across the desert, and bring what you've learned back to the source. The world isn't big enough to let you run away forever, and there might be some people back there that share your purpose, if not your identity.
NOTE: Wow, I wrote this piece anonymously and privately and did not intend for anyone else to actually read it. It was a way for me to vent…
8
Brian “Psychochild” Green's profile photoJay Gischer's profile photoSara Anderson's profile photoBrenda Holloway's profile photo
5 comments
 
What struck me is the utter lack of hope in there, or acceptance.
Add a comment...

Jay Gischer

Shared publicly  - 
 
I'm not just against Trump. I am for Hillary.
Why we keep missing Hillary Clinton’s greatest strength.
6
2
John Wehrle's profile photoSteve Yuan's profile photoJay Gischer's profile photo
13 comments
 
As a side note, I include the internet media in "media", but +Steve Yuan is referencing the wholly non-professional internet - embodied in chat, social media, and so on.

People who come together because of similar interests form something I might call a "pre-community". Playfully I might refer to them using Kurt Vonnegut's term "granfalloon".

Building a community requires some work and effort. Until some cost is experienced to become or maintain membership status in a community, the community has little force or meaning. Once you embark on a project together, or simply practice some visible forbearance for the sake of togetherness, there is no real community, because it has no real value.

You see internet pre-communities fracture and splinter all the time, this is a consequence of that dynamic.
Add a comment...

Jay Gischer

Shared publicly  - 
 
The author, Aline Lerner, had some interesting findings with this experiment. She works at a site that lets computer types do practice online interviews:

Specifically, men were getting advanced to the next round 1.4 times more often than women. Interviewee technical score wasn’t faring that well either — men on the platform had an average technical score of 3 out of 4, as compared to a 2.5 out of 4 for women.

What she found, though, was ... well I'll let her tell you:

After running the experiment, we ended up with some rather surprising results. Contrary to what we expected (and probably contrary to what you expected as well!), masking gender had no effect on interview performance with respect to any of the scoring criteria (would advance to next round, technical ability, problem solving ability).

So what was going on? How to account for the disparity cited up front?

But there was one nagging thing in the back of my mind. I spend a lot of my time poring over interview data, and I had noticed something peculiar when observing the behavior of female interviewees. Anecdotally, it seemed like women were leaving the platform a lot more often than men. So I ran the numbers.

What I learned was pretty shocking. As it happens, women leave interviewing.io roughly 7 times as often as men after they do badly in an interview.

She has some nice graphs to show this data and its consequences.

This got me thinking. I think that this is very unlikely (though not impossible) to be the result of some biological difference. I am quite familiar with all the institutions that encourage boys and young men to stick to it. Aline cites dating, but I think there's more specific culture to it. Sports for one thing - "shake it off, get back in the game". Women have been engaging in sports more, this is good.

I've seen women writing things where they have engaged with this when learning to play PvP videogames or card games as well. Others talk about the confidence with which you might pitch a story or a novel to an editor.

This isn't a book-learning kind of lesson, though. It's more about continuing to engage, time after time, in a supportive environment (at least at first, you've truly mastered it when you do it in a somewhat hostile enviornment)

And we attempt to instill this in all the children who come to our martial arts classes, be they girls or boys. I think we've been somewhat successful with the girls. We need to be thinking about how, as a culture, we can reach more girls with this.

This can sound kind of victim blamy. I don't want that to be your takeaway. Instead, I want you to think of this mindset as an advantage - a privilege - that we bestow on boys disproportionately more than girls.
48
7
Sara Anderson's profile photoChris Embree's profile photoJay Gischer's profile photoCindy Brown's profile photo
10 comments
 
I enjoy the problem solving aspects of IT. The stupid shits that comprise some of the other IT people in it, not so much.
Add a comment...

Jay Gischer

Shared publicly  - 
 
If you're relatively new to this game, let me let you in on something. This is exactly what it's been like to be a Clinton supporter since 1992. There's always been someone extrapolating way beyond the facts into some crazy theory about horrific wrongdoing. And when the legal system, which moves as slowly as rumormongering runs fast, gets around to drawing a conclusion has always been "there's nothing there", other than what Hillary already said was there. Dozens of times.

Nothing. There.

This is how it works. This is how it has always worked. This is why I ignore all charges of dishonesty of this candidate.

I know what she wants because she's been taking action on that agenda for the last 40 years, in public view. I trust her to take more action on those points when she becomes President. I think she is an extremely good negotiator, because she actually gets agreements on things that move her (and usually my) agenda forward.

Holding your breath until you get exactly what you wanted is not the hallmark of a good negotiator. It's the hallmark of someone who doesn't want to sully themselves or appear weak regardless of who else gets damaged in the process. I would prefer we leave that strategy to the Tea Party.
So now we have our answer: There won't be any charges against Hillary Clinton or anyone else in the 'email server scandal' which has played such a huge role to date in the 2016 election. It is important to understand what James Comey said. The relevant statutes are broad enough that lots of people could conceivably be charged under them. And there are occasional cases where prosecutors do use that expansive nature to charge people they really hav...
11
5
Steven Flaeck's profile photoElizabeth Halloway's profile photoAx Ix's profile photoMatt Harmon's profile photo
28 comments
 
If money were so important to politics, Sanders would be the presumed Democratic nominee for president.

Until the UK referendum and the rise of Trump, I never understood the problem with populism. After witnessing both, and living in Arizona (where right wing populism rules the day), I'm absolutely opposed to it. Sanders and Trump (along with Farage, Johnson and Corbyn in the UK) are populists and would be (and may yet still be) disasters in power.
Add a comment...

Jay Gischer

Shared publicly  - 
 
I saw this last night. Highly recommended. Would see again.
2
Add a comment...

Jay Gischer

Shared publicly  - 
 
I guess Milo can go hang out on 4chan. He's still welcome there, right?
Twitter on Tuesday banned conservative writer and self-described provocateur Milo Yiannopoulos from its site, a day after he was accused of leading an online hate campaign against actress Leslie Jones — …
4
John Wehrle's profile photo
 
Every once in a while I think about making a Twitter account and then I remember all the people I went to high school with also being on twitter and the interest passes.
Add a comment...

Jay Gischer

Shared publicly  - 
 
My brother-in-laws workplace got hit with this. He's the "IT guy" at the store, so it pretty much made his life miserable, along with a lot of other people. So, anybody know what happened?

I mean, this is the thing you work really hard to keep from happening, right? I would rule out some sort of malicious agent, but it's probably something stupid.
4
Add a comment...

Jay Gischer

Shared publicly  - 
 
I support these. They sound to me like very solid improvements to police-community relations. Some of them may be tricky, but they would all be good things.

via +Aleatha Parker-Wood 
8
Add a comment...

Jay Gischer

Shared publicly  - 
 
Apparently it was the overture to Tannhauser: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SRmCEGHt-Qk

which I kind of love. So that's one thing we have in common.

(The thing he was humming is easy to pick out starting at about 2:30)
 
I do wonder what he was humming.
@OpperKop @BBCDanielS was he humming the opening to the overture to Tannhäuser? Perhaps Cameron sees himself as the heroic minstrel-knight. colin hobson · 3h3 hours ago. colin hobson @Jettco. @BBCDanielS @greg_jenner Just announced.....David Cameron to join Andy Murray's Coaching Team :).
1 comment on original post
1
Add a comment...

Jay Gischer

Shared publicly  - 
 
Now I think Gnome Ann has to be a legendary figure in the next campaign I run.
Warning: this comic occasionally contains strong language (which may be unsuitable for children), unusual humor (which may be unsuitable for adults), and advanced mathematics (which may be unsuitable for liberal-arts majors). BTC 1FhCLQK2ZXtCUQDtG98p6fVH7S6mxAsEey
8
Katrina Gischer's profile photoRandall Tice's profile photo
2 comments
 
On August 10th,  Gnome Ann's Sky will be available for Playstation 4.
Add a comment...

Jay Gischer

Shared publicly  - 
 
I'm curious whether you need different constructs to identify different substances. It seems like you would.
 
From the article:

"We created a MOF that absorbs the phosphonates found in pesticides and nerve gases. This means you can use it to find traces of chemical weapons such as sarin or to identify the residue of pesticides on food."
[..]
"The concentrations we're dealing with are extremely low: parts per billion - a drop of water in an Olympic swimming pool - and parts per trillion."
[..]
it's fairly easy to equip a smartphone with a gas sensor for pesticides and nerve gas."
[..]
"so we could use them to screen someone's breath for diseases such as lung cancer and MS in an early stage. Or we could use the signature scent of a product to find out whether food has gone bad or to distinguish imitation wine from the original. This technology, in other words, offers a wide range of perspectives."
Detecting pesticides and nerve gas in very low concentrations. An international team of researchers led by Ivo Stassen and Rob Ameloot from KU Leuven, Belgium, have made it possible.
View original post
3
John Wehrle's profile photo
 
It seems to me that this is a whole spectrum of perception we've historically ignored (relative to light and sound) that holds much promise. Also, I suspect you are right. That almost seems like a universal feature of senses. What counts as visible depends on the rods and cones and configuration of your eye, what counts as audible depends on the frequencies your ear is configured to pick up.
Add a comment...
People
Work
Occupation
I write software.
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Relationship
Married
Story
Tagline
I am not a robot, I am a unicorn!
Introduction
I'm a software developer by day, 3000-year-old redheaded elf by night.  Born in Blaine, I surprised many in Lynden by my success.  You can tell I live in Silicon Valley, because I know what "Sunnytoga-DeAnzavale Road" refers to.
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Mountain View, CA
Links