Profile

Cover photo
Carrie Lackey
Attends University of Texas at Dallas
66 followers|8,052 views
AboutPostsPhotosYouTube+1's

Stream

 
Before reading Robert Nideffer's piece "Game Engines as Creative Frameworks" I had not given much thought to our sister Arts and Technology (ATEC) program here at UT Dallas.

As the work came to a close, I began to realize that the ATEC students are up against the very same struggle as Emerging Media and Communication students in that we are trying to make a name for ourselves in an academic world that is just beginning to recognize but is not fully cognizant of what it is our programs are bringing to the the table.

Artists like Eddo Stern are using the game engine in a way that allows for the gaming world to see that the production and consumption of video games brings with it a social responsibility we had not thought of before. And suddenly the possibilities behind being a student who gets to create works of art that call attention to the cultural implications associated with modifying game engines into video game "art" seems very worthy indeed.
1
Add a comment...
 
(In response to +Erika Oliver 's post in conjunction with Scott McCloud's chapter on color).

I agree that color is a "connection between real life and comic work". Color provokes or capitalizes on the depth of an emotion(s) without ever having to name it directly.

Refer to the panel on the bottom left of page 185. No one actually says that. You would never hear an antagonist say he/she felt particularly evil that day. The use of color does that for them, and it does so with a subjective intensity that allows for a more personable experience based on the reader's perception. I think McCloud would agree that this is the indirect approach that allows color “to take on a central role” within the narrative rather than being merely an afterthought or just part of the scenery (p.190).

Notice the monochromatic use of red in this panel of "Coffin Hill" by Caitlin Kittredge. It would be easy for me to tell you how much weight to give the color in this scene, but I am more interested in
hearing from my classmates. Would the panel be as effective if it were dark purple?

Images courtesy of DC entertainment. Art by Inaki Miranda
1
Add a comment...

Carrie Lackey

Hufflepuff  - 
 
A Response to (a reference) within Christiane Paul's "The Database..."

 Words have long been used to push or describe societal boundaries, but now they can surpass all spatial confines. The data base has become an art medium. Words often exist on a page (digital or in print), in our heads and even in our ears, but once we have read them, where do they go?

The idea that digital text can have an almost tangible form like the ones illustrated in the Text Arcs intrigues me. I have to admit that what it looks like in my head is nothing like how it looks on the website.

I had a bit of trouble getting the Java plug in to work on Text Arc's website(thanks Apple), but I was fortunate enough to find this clip of W. Bradley Paley's talk at a Digital Art talk for Google in New York. It actually worked out better because we get to hear Bradley's thoughts behind his art. He also answered a few of the questions that had been rolling around in my head.

For example, I wondered if the words that appear brighter tell some kind of story, and if so, how similar is it to the original narrative? Bradley described it as a "tool for structuralized literary analysts," who can then predict how the book is organized. Presumably, they can then read the book to determine if they were correct.

Can you imagine the reader/user's interactive experience if one invested this much time before they even read the book? If this does not exemplify what this digital text class is all about, I do not know what will.
1
Kim Knight's profile photo
 
Carrie, Good job connecting the reading to a concrete example in TextArc. I know Paul (and maybe Stefans too?) brings it up but I am glad you went out to try to experience it (It still works in Safari, I think, if you want to give it a try). For your next response, try to push your analysis a bit deeper and answer the "so what?" question.
Add a comment...

Carrie Lackey

Dementors  - 
 
You have to admit, it was still an easier read than "Cyborg Manifesto".
 
I can not believe that was simply the introduction. Ryan's view on narrative is so far and beyond what I would even have room to process and honestly what I even have room to retain. I liked the middle to latter half of the read though. It was interesting to think about not only mediums and how they can distort a message, but also become their own version of the message. I enjoyed trying to wrap my ahead around the idea of creating a narrative with the intention of how it will work for an audience, and also the difference between narrative and genre based on their limitations and how we operate with them. I think that is really interesting that we base genres on limitations and operate with mediums to get around limitations. Outside of these initial thoughts, can I just say that the text almost rags on itself when it says "The standard case of dissociation occurs when the story is so poorly presented that the audience cannot reconstrue rhe proper script." I felt that way a lot while reading this text because the 'narrative' or lack there of the ideas expressed were communicated in a really unnatural  over-bearing way. Maybe that's just me.
1
Cameron Gallucci's profile photo
 
 No, trust me, that's not just you. I found it pretty impressive how you were able to pull a quote, directly from the text, that points to the author's communicative shortcomings. Or, signifies them, might we say.
Add a comment...

Carrie Lackey

Shared publicly  - 
 
This isn't helping their self esteem to be reminded of their objectivity.
1
Add a comment...
Have her in circles
66 people
Landon Ledford's profile photo
Billy Simpson's profile photo
Mark Ramsey's profile photo
Johnny Davis's profile photo
Nico Martini's profile photo
Christa Elias's profile photo
Samia Nasir's profile photo
Danielle Escobar's profile photo

Carrie Lackey

Hufflepuff  - 
 
Primary response to "California Noise..."

I cannot begin to tell you how awesome it is to be able to talk about the era of sound from which punk emerged.Despite two very different career paths, both Van Halen and Greg Ginn refused to settle for the traditional sound of an electric guitar. Their independent works became a much bigger mode of expression in which they strove to emulate the sounds they heard in their head with the actual notes their fingers created.

As Emerging Media and Communication students we are being encouraged to tinker not just with the software or hardware but with the concept of sound. The challenge for the sound artifact in our final portfolio lies within our ability to manipulate the sound as Van Halen did--in that it told his story rather than defined it.

And much like the paper's author, I'm slipping in the small blurb about feminism at the very end. I want to become indignant over the idea that suburban men tinkered in their garages in an effort to take back their domesticated manhood, but then I realized that it's plausible. Women were resigned to the home's interior and men to the garage. The garage became a room to mess with things. One could take them apart and reconfigure them just because. I want women to be able to take part in that, but then it hit me. We want to fix things with an end result in sight rather than just screwing with things to see how we could alter them to fit our needs.

That being said, the idea that the guitar as a phallic extension of the power of producing rather than consuming sounds silly, but then again, it has a certain weight of truth to it. However I will draw the line that any woman who plays guitar is doing so as a result of penis envy. Maybe... she just wanted to fix her guitar in order to express internal attributes.

And as a side note, I do not recommend listening to Van Halen after Eddie left the band.

Eddie Van Halen's Eruption Solo
1
Cameron Gallucci's profile photoKristin Patterson's profile photo
2 comments
 
"Their independent works became a much bigger mode of expression in which they strove to emulate the sounds they heard in their head with the actual notes their fingers created." You hit on a very salient observation about communication -- the medium cants the message (for better, worse, neither, or both). Expressing an idea -or, in Van Halen's and Greg Ginn's points, unique sounds- via sound is especially fascinating because I think society has sparse parameters for defining components of sound inherent in communicating a message (compared to the parameters behind spoken word, or even that of 2D art). 

On a gross tangent to my previous point, I too feel a tug at my pant leg to get miffed over the patriarchal, heteronormative household presented by the "men in their garage, women in the house" dynamic, but, yeah, therein rings some truth -- boys (er, men, I mean PEOPLE) can be messy. Taking that mess to the garage was a thoughtful idea, qualifier, qualifier, etc., etc. And then this notion of women as passive, "domestic goddesses" in their gilded cages reminds me of this Louis CK bit (and let's remember that his POV on gender isn't Truth either) Louis CK - Girls vs Boys 
Add a comment...

Carrie Lackey

Hufflepuff  - 
 
Kristin, I like the idea that words can be bigger and have more figurative possibilities than the restrictive limits of literal meanings. The universe is boundless after all, why shouldn't words be?
 
Response to Carrie's 9/17 post: 
I love the notion of aesthetics enhancing an intangible/abstract idea. I think, in fleshing out the author's intended meaning with aesthetics, it begs the question of universal ideas/philosophies that extend just beyond out scope of understanding (otherwise we wouldn't be able to continually nuance our ideas; they would be communicable in a much more concise manner). Regarding Paley's talk and Paul's message(s) in "The Database," words are used to invite the reader/user to explore these gentlemen's ideas; words are concrete and restrictive, so barring a long-winded explanation wherein each word is meticulously selected like grains of rice with chop sticks, I think both scholars shed light on the fact that the words aren't conclusively the meaning in the message; words are one dimension of a dense idea, provided and exercised as tools to explore the deeper meaning.
1
Add a comment...

Carrie Lackey

Dumbledore's Army  - 
 
Samia, I hadn't thought of it in re:to the Internet. It certainly is applicable.
 
Barthes takes an interesting path when addressing the significance of an author in relation to his or her work. By challenging the very core of our values; the belief that an author writes a book based on his/her perceptions, feelings, ideas, and so forth is put to question when he basically claims that words and writing is what could make a person an author, and not the other way around.  His attempts to liberate writing from the book, and shifting the focus away from what he believes is the author -  “epitome and culmination of capitalist ideology, which has attached the greatest importance to the ‘person’ of the author” (p2) is an interesting perspective when studying the digital era today. 

Barthes’s basically states that an author should not completely claim ownership of his/her work, that the text is “made of multiple writings” (p4); which I perceive means that an author does not necessarily call the shots for the book, but rather the reader has a say in its interpretation as well.  His theory isn’t far off from the Ecstasy of Influence article, in which the author claims that all writers subconsciously get their ideas from a previous source. In my opinion, he does bring up an interesting point – our ideas are usually led on from previous ones. 

When reading Barthes in particular, I felt as though his theory could be applicable for the internet today. I could not help but think of the numerous collaborative writing structures we have available today. Even something as simple as a blog post has multiple links of reference attached to it, linking that work to other sites and links, and so forth. A blogger reinforcing or challenging perspectives of other bloggers (or news outlets). Its an interesting concept to observe; living in the world we live in, where people are tending more towards digital. Just my thoughts and theories is a mesh! 
1
Add a comment...

Carrie Lackey

Hufflepuff  - 
 
http://youtu.be/fXYckRgsdjI

In response to your question, I have to admit that I am in transition from step 1 to step 2 of McCloud's 6. I have always known that I wanted to write, and I do not care in what medium. 

It has only been this week in the minutes before my body gives way to sleep while my brain cycles on, that I have narrowed down the medium that needs to occur first. 

Because I am still in the stages of demonstrating my capacity for my craft, I want to focus on one extremely modern blog that showcases the "So what?" factor of journalism that will help me to answer McCloud's unanswerable "Will anyone listen?"

In my experience, they will listen if we write (or in your case design) for ourselves. The people who relate and respond to our message(s) are the ones who are listening.

My question for you, Erika is this, how does one get back to their purpose when vocational success clouds the creator's view?
 
McCloud's take on the creative path that a successful artist inevitably follows was a very interesting read, indeed. His comments (pages 176-77) regarding the woman who creates her own idiom really stands out to me in connection to the concept of remixed culture.

When creating something of artistic value, we all want to be original masterminds, but the truth is that all creations are inspired. We might set out to create our own idiom, or genre, however what are we really doing? We are finding "new ways of showing the same old thing" (McCloud, 176). 

When we consider the concept of the Earth's shape becoming definite, we consider an instance of a remixed model. For thousands of years society believed in a flat planet until Eratosthenes came around and found a NEW way to explain the same OLD Earth. He conducted experiments and made measurements to further concrete his idea. 

A great deal of the best discoveries were not made alone, they were built upon fundamental laws of science, which were built upon common sense, which was built upon either divine intervention or a massive bang, depending on your religious beliefs.

Moving forward, I certainly see myself within McCloud’s process. In my quest as a budding graphic artist, I feel that I have purchased the “right” software and I’ve successfully scored a job. The surface of my work must appeal to the idiom I have inserted myself into, but have I truly stayed loyal to my original purpose? 

Like many designers, I seek to make this world a more beautiful place. Creators often get into the loop of vocational success and lose sight of the passion and purpose that brought them here. My question to you guys is as follows: Where are you located within the 6 steps?
1
Kim Knight's profile photoCarrie Lackey's profile photo
2 comments
 
Kim, I certainly hope so.
Add a comment...

Carrie Lackey

Shared publicly  - 
 
Really enjoyed producing the interview with this guy!
1
Add a comment...
People
Have her in circles
66 people
Landon Ledford's profile photo
Billy Simpson's profile photo
Mark Ramsey's profile photo
Johnny Davis's profile photo
Nico Martini's profile photo
Christa Elias's profile photo
Samia Nasir's profile photo
Danielle Escobar's profile photo
Education
  • University of Texas at Dallas
    EMAC, 2012 - present
Links
Contributor to
Story
Tagline
Just trying to make my place in this world.
Introduction
Come on, you know you found the right Carrie. Don't be silly.
Basic Information
Gender
Female
Carrie Lackey's +1's are the things they like, agree with, or want to recommend.
ZocDoc - Get well sooner.
www.zocdoc.com

Find a great doctor and make your appointment online on ZocDoc! You can search by specialty, location and insurance, and it's completely fre